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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012
'Symphony' by Steven Stucky Where: Walt Disney Concert Hall, downtown L.A. When: 8 p.m, Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday Tickets: $54.50 to $189 Information: (323) 850-2000 or http://www.laphil.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
LA JOLLA - SummerFest, one of the country's most significant chamber music festivals, devoted its annual program of new work Friday night at Sherwood Auditorium in the Museum of Contemporary Art here to three American masters. The composers - Steven Stucky, David Del Tredici and John Harbison - are major figures and had never before appeared together on a program. Their works had something to say. But the one thing the evening wasn't happened to be what it was called: "Musical Crossroads.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When Steven Stucky set out earlier this year to write his first symphony, one of the most difficult decisions he faced was deciding what to call it. The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer had actually written four symphonies in his youth - but to hear him put it, those efforts don't really count. "I wrote two when I was a little boy, and I have no idea what unholy mash-up those were," he recalled in a recent phone interview. "Then I wrote a symphony when I was a senior in college, and then one for my doctoral thesis, and I'm sure those have been completely expunged from the record.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
You can't seemingly find a more insider composer than David Del Tredici, whose “Bullycide” was commissioned by La Jolla Music Society's SummerFest and will have its premiere Friday night in Sherwood Auditorium of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. He's won a Pulitzer Prize and been composer-in-residence of the New York Philharmonic. He's on the faculty of City College of New York and is a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. He has been, in his music, obsessed with “Alice in Wonderland.” “Paul Revere” has been a subject of interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Steven Stucky's brand-new Second Concerto for Orchestra arrived Friday night like another garden for Walt Disney Concert Hall. A colorful, delight-bringing score, it has the feel of music we know well lovingly replanted to charm new surroundings. Stucky, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's consulting composer for new music, has had a 16-year relationship with the orchestra that began when he was composer in residence in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2007 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Composer Steven Stucky is no stranger to Los Angeles, where he has been involved with the Philharmonic in planning and creative capacities since the '80s. He won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for his Phil-premiered Second Concerto for Orchestra. But a different side of Stucky was in the spotlight Sunday afternoon in Thousand Oaks, where his chamber music was performed in California Lutheran University's fifth annual New Music Concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Up to now, Los Angeles Philharmonic "First Nights" concerts have focused on the past. Actors and musicians have evoked the life and times of composers on the day some of their major works had their premieres. That's how the series has re-created the initial performances of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring," among other repertory staples.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
LA JOLLA - SummerFest, one of the country's most significant chamber music festivals, devoted its annual program of new work Friday night at Sherwood Auditorium in the Museum of Contemporary Art here to three American masters. The composers - Steven Stucky, David Del Tredici and John Harbison - are major figures and had never before appeared together on a program. Their works had something to say. But the one thing the evening wasn't happened to be what it was called: "Musical Crossroads.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Gustavo Dudamel, Angeleno. He's getting there. He owns a house with a pool in Los Feliz. He drives a Porsche. His son, Martín, was born here. And he has, in his first three seasons as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, shown admirable locavore tendencies in his programming as well as his reaching out to L.A.'s underprivileged youth. But until Friday night, Dudamel had yet to acknowledge two essential L.A. Phil traditions. For his first subscription concert of his fourth season, he premiered a new score by Steven Stucky, a composer with a near-quarter-century connection to the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Stucky has been serving the Los Angeles Philharmonic's new music program in one capacity or another since 1988--practically an eternity as such positions go. So they held a 50th birthday party for him Monday night at the Japan America Theatre, and had him select and conduct a program in the tradition of Composer's Choice, the direct forerunner of the current Green Umbrella Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Gustavo Dudamel, Angeleno. He's getting there. He owns a house with a pool in Los Feliz. He drives a Porsche. His son, Martín, was born here. And he has, in his first three seasons as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, shown admirable locavore tendencies in his programming as well as his reaching out to L.A.'s underprivileged youth. But until Friday night, Dudamel had yet to acknowledge two essential L.A. Phil traditions. For his first subscription concert of his fourth season, he premiered a new score by Steven Stucky, a composer with a near-quarter-century connection to the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012
'Symphony' by Steven Stucky Where: Walt Disney Concert Hall, downtown L.A. When: 8 p.m, Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday Tickets: $54.50 to $189 Information: (323) 850-2000 or http://www.laphil.com
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When Steven Stucky set out earlier this year to write his first symphony, one of the most difficult decisions he faced was deciding what to call it. The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer had actually written four symphonies in his youth - but to hear him put it, those efforts don't really count. "I wrote two when I was a little boy, and I have no idea what unholy mash-up those were," he recalled in a recent phone interview. "Then I wrote a symphony when I was a senior in college, and then one for my doctoral thesis, and I'm sure those have been completely expunged from the record.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008
'Bernstein: The Best of All Possible Worlds' This two-month festival in New York, jointly sponsored by Carnegie Hall and the New York Philharmonic, will open with an all-Bernstein program in Carnegie by the San Francisco Symphony conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas and featuring Dawn Upshaw and Yo-Yo Ma. The West Coast will get a preview when the San Franciscans perform the program a week earlier as part of their hometown concert series....
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
In a talk before Tuesday's Green Umbrella program at Walt Disney Concert Hall, Steven Stucky -- the Los Angeles Philharmonic's consulting composer for new music, who turned 58 last month -- noted that he had been associated with the orchestra for more than a third of his life and a good half of his composing career. The concert by the orchestra's new-music group was a 20th anniversary celebration. The L.A. Philharmonic has been good to Stucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2007 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Composer Steven Stucky is no stranger to Los Angeles, where he has been involved with the Philharmonic in planning and creative capacities since the '80s. He won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for his Phil-premiered Second Concerto for Orchestra. But a different side of Stucky was in the spotlight Sunday afternoon in Thousand Oaks, where his chamber music was performed in California Lutheran University's fifth annual New Music Concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
You can't seemingly find a more insider composer than David Del Tredici, whose “Bullycide” was commissioned by La Jolla Music Society's SummerFest and will have its premiere Friday night in Sherwood Auditorium of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. He's won a Pulitzer Prize and been composer-in-residence of the New York Philharmonic. He's on the faculty of City College of New York and is a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. He has been, in his music, obsessed with “Alice in Wonderland.” “Paul Revere” has been a subject of interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2000 | JEREMY EICHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he approaches the end of his one-year sabbatical from the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen took the stage of Carnegie's Weill Recital Hall on Sunday for a rare evening that brought together his disparate roles as conductor and composer. For this concert, part of Carnegie Hall's Making Music series, he was both at once, leading the admirable Ensemble Sospeso and special guests in three of his own recent works as well as music by Witold Lutoslawski and Steven Stucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Steven Stucky's brand-new Second Concerto for Orchestra arrived Friday night like another garden for Walt Disney Concert Hall. A colorful, delight-bringing score, it has the feel of music we know well lovingly replanted to charm new surroundings. Stucky, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's consulting composer for new music, has had a 16-year relationship with the orchestra that began when he was composer in residence in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Up to now, Los Angeles Philharmonic "First Nights" concerts have focused on the past. Actors and musicians have evoked the life and times of composers on the day some of their major works had their premieres. That's how the series has re-created the initial performances of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring," among other repertory staples.
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