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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a year that has seen would-be action heroes Jeff Speakman and Brian Bosworth make well-orchestrated attempts to muscle their way into the action-adventure movie arena, Columbia Pictures is clearly betting that Jean-Claude Van Damme could be the next Chuck Norris, Steven Seagal--or even Arnold Schwarzenegger. "Double Impact," the $15-million action film in which Van Damme plays dual roles, opened well Aug. 9 and has grossed $15.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
An exhibit booth--just the booth, not the people--was once taken hostage by a New York trucking company in a dispute with an air freight firm over an unpaid bill. The kidnaping stunt worked. The panicked company that owned the booth scurried to scrape together something--anything--else for the trade show that was about to open in Washington. Meanwhile, it pleaded for a settlement and, barely in time, the deal was made and the booth set free.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
There are frequent fliers, and then there are people like Steven Rothstein and Jacques Vroom. Both men bought tickets that gave them unlimited first-class travel for life on American Airlines. It was almost like owning a fleet of private jets. Passes in hand, Rothstein and Vroom flew for business. They flew for pleasure. They flew just because they liked being on planes. They bypassed long lines, booked backup itineraries in case the weather turned, and never worried about cancellation fees.
NEWS
July 9, 1985 | JOHN HURST and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
A wall of flames threatened the eastern edge of San Luis Obispo for a time on Monday, destroying several structures and forcing the evacuation of numerous residents when erratic winds abruptly pushed the week-old 58,000-acre Las Pilitas fire down out of the foothills. San Luis Obispo County Airport on the south side of the city was closed.
SPORTS
November 30, 1996 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Win one for the fat man? Win one for the Holtzer? Could anyone have dreamed, even a month ago, that the 1996 college football season would come down to this? To a USC team turned upside-down by three consecutive defeats and speculation that its coach is about to be turned loose? To a Notre Dame team whose coach is walking away, virtually without explanation, from the sport's best job? Yet that's exactly how the script reads when Notre Dame (8-2) plays USC (5-6) tonight at a sold-out Coliseum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000
Craig Stevens, 81, the actor who helped create a new genre of television detective heroes in the role of suave private eye "Peter Gunn," a series created by Blake Edwards. With its film noir style, deadpan humor and jazzy instrumental score by Henry Mancini, "Peter Gunn" featured one of the first of the coolly aggressive, lady-killer private detectives to be seen on television. Born Gail Shikles Jr. in Liberty, Mo.
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