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SPORTS
November 22, 1987 | Scott Ostler
The railbirds. They arrive early at Hollywood Park on Breeders' Cup day, staking out their favorite positions near the rail, getting into the rhythm of the day, sniffing the air and the tout sheets for winners. They pay $2.75 to get in, and if they're lucky, they get a free Breeders' Cup sweater-vest before the supply mysteriously runs out. They have come to bet the big one, but they don't often win. Somebody has to pay the jocks and horses and program vendors and winners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1999 | STEVEN HERBERT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Peter Mehlman, executive producer of the new ABC series "It's like, you know . . . ," had an especially difficult time trying to cast the role of Robbie Graham, a Lutheran who made untold riches after creating a pay-per-view telecast of a Yom Kippur service. He envisioned John Cusack, an actor who can pull off being simultaneously glib and likable. None of the nearly 50 actors who auditioned--an unusually high number, he said--were able to manage it to Mehlman's liking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2003 | Chuck Neubauer and Richard T. Cooper, Times Staff Writers
It was the kind of legislation that slips under the radar here. The name alone made the eyes glaze over: "The Clark County Conservation of Public Land and Natural Resources Act of 2002." In a welter of technical jargon, it dealt with boundary shifts, land trades and other arcane matters -- all in Nevada. As he introduced it, Nevada's senior U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Frozen," the hit Disney animated musical about a girl who tries to save her kingdom and her ice-powered sister, has become the latest Hollywood movie to rile conservative commentators, with one pastor criticizing the film for indoctrinating homosexuality and bestiality in children. On the talk show Generations Radio, Kevin Swanson and his co-host, Steve Vaughn, took Disney to task for "leading the charge" in promoting a "pro-homosexual" agenda in "Frozen. " Swanson and Vaughn referred to posts by Steven D. Greydanus for the National Catholic Register and Gina Luttrell for the liberal PolicyMic -- the former of which critiques "Frozen's" alleged gay message (the commentators agree with this one)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
How does a man who turned his back on the world of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll in a quest to be closer to God feel about being welcomed into an institution whose very name celebrates the culture of fame? “Even though it's taken time, I've always been an optimist,” said the 65-year-old musician born Steven Georgiou, formerly known as Cat Stevens and who now uses the single name Yusuf. “I was brought up on the view that if you wait patiently till the end of the story, the good people will live happily ever after.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a year that has seen would-be action heroes Jeff Speakman and Brian Bosworth make well-orchestrated attempts to muscle their way into the action-adventure movie arena, Columbia Pictures is clearly betting that Jean-Claude Van Damme could be the next Chuck Norris, Steven Seagal--or even Arnold Schwarzenegger. "Double Impact," the $15-million action film in which Van Damme plays dual roles, opened well Aug. 9 and has grossed $15.
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