YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteven


September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
September 12, 1998
1995: Initial Sexual Encounters Monica Lewinsky began her White House employment as an intern in the Chief of Staff's office in July 1995. At White House functions in the following months, she made eye contact with the President. During the November 1995 government shutdown, the President invited her to his private study, where they kissed. Later that evening, they had a more intimate sexual encounter. They had another sexual encounter two days later, and a third one on New Year's Eve. A.
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
In a year that has seen would-be action heroes Jeff Speakman and Brian Bosworth make well-orchestrated attempts to muscle their way into the action-adventure movie arena, Columbia Pictures is clearly betting that Jean-Claude Van Damme could be the next Chuck Norris, Steven Seagal--or even Arnold Schwarzenegger. "Double Impact," the $15-million action film in which Van Damme plays dual roles, opened well Aug. 9 and has grossed $15.
November 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
An exhibit booth--just the booth, not the people--was once taken hostage by a New York trucking company in a dispute with an air freight firm over an unpaid bill. The kidnaping stunt worked. The panicked company that owned the booth scurried to scrape together something--anything--else for the trade show that was about to open in Washington. Meanwhile, it pleaded for a settlement and, barely in time, the deal was made and the booth set free.
July 9, 1985 | JOHN HURST and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
A wall of flames threatened the eastern edge of San Luis Obispo for a time on Monday, destroying several structures and forcing the evacuation of numerous residents when erratic winds abruptly pushed the week-old 58,000-acre Las Pilitas fire down out of the foothills. San Luis Obispo County Airport on the south side of the city was closed.
Win one for the fat man? Win one for the Holtzer? Could anyone have dreamed, even a month ago, that the 1996 college football season would come down to this? To a USC team turned upside-down by three consecutive defeats and speculation that its coach is about to be turned loose? To a Notre Dame team whose coach is walking away, virtually without explanation, from the sport's best job? Yet that's exactly how the script reads when Notre Dame (8-2) plays USC (5-6) tonight at a sold-out Coliseum.
August 29, 1999 | JANET WISCOMBE, Janet Wiscombe is a frequent contributor to The Times who last wrote about professional beach volleyball for the magazine
Sally Ride doesn't look like a woman outrageous enough to sit on top of a stack of enormous flaming rockets. There's absolutely nothing about her refined appearance or manner to suggest she has the grit to travel into the great, dark, airless abyss strapped to the seat of a hurtling piece of machinery. She's small, reserved, a reluctant heroine uneasy with eminence, a self-possessed but distant star who navigates her rarefied universe with quiet control.
Los Angeles Times Articles