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HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Stevia followers are a diverse bunch, including health nuts and food-industry magnates. The draw? The sweetener is all-natural and naturally calorie-free. But "natural" doesn't necessarily mean safe, and scientists have long struggled to make sense of early evidence hinting that stevia could be toxic. A series of studies published last month in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology put that question to the test for one type of stevia-based sweeteners. Stevia, a South American shrub, has leaves up to 300 times sweeter than table sugar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It's been 60 years since diet soda first burst on the scene with a sugar-free ginger ale known as No-Cal that catered to diabetics. Then came RC Cola's Diet Rite, followed by Tab, Fresca and a slew of sugar-free versions of Pepsi and Coca-Cola that seem to be in perpetual states of reformulation to accommodate customers' fickle tastes. Today, it isn't just colas that are going on a diet. The market for no-calorie sodas has become as effervescent as the beverages themselves, with an ever-expanding palette of exotic flavors such as coconut, pomegranate and coffee - many of them from small companies that are developing loyal followings catering to customers' thirst for carbonated indulgence without the sugar.
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HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It's been 60 years since diet soda first burst on the scene with a sugar-free ginger ale known as No-Cal that catered to diabetics. Then came RC Cola's Diet Rite, followed by Tab, Fresca and a slew of sugar-free versions of Pepsi and Coca-Cola that seem to be in perpetual states of reformulation to accommodate customers' fickle tastes. Today, it isn't just colas that are going on a diet. The market for no-calorie sodas has become as effervescent as the beverages themselves, with an ever-expanding palette of exotic flavors such as coconut, pomegranate and coffee - many of them from small companies that are developing loyal followings catering to customers' thirst for carbonated indulgence without the sugar.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2008 | times wire reports
Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc. will offer drinks with a no-calorie natural sweetener after the Food and Drug Administration said it had no objection to the use of the product made from the stevia plant. Coca-Cola said it would introduce Sprite Green using its version of the sweetener, which it calls Truvia, at youth-oriented events this month and plans a broader rollout next year. Two flavors of Odwalla juice sweetened with Truvia are being put on store shelves now, the company said.
HEALTH
May 31, 2004 | Elena Conis
Stevia, an extract from a South American shrub, is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar -- and practically calorie free. It's been used for centuries to sweeten herbal teas in South America, and for the last 20 years, it's also been widely used as a commercial sweetener in Japan and Brazil. It's not an approved food additive in the U.S., but it is sold in health food stores as a dietary supplement. * Uses: Stevia is often used as a replacement for sugar.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2008 | times wire reports
Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc. will offer drinks with a no-calorie natural sweetener after the Food and Drug Administration said it had no objection to the use of the product made from the stevia plant. Coca-Cola said it would introduce Sprite Green using its version of the sweetener, which it calls Truvia, at youth-oriented events this month and plans a broader rollout next year. Two flavors of Odwalla juice sweetened with Truvia are being put on store shelves now, the company said.
FOOD
February 28, 2001 | DAVID KARP
The past week's rains made life miserable for farmers market vendors by hindering harvests and discouraging customers. On a wet and windy Saturday, nevertheless, the Santa Monica Organic market drew a steady stream of shoppers who wouldn't miss their fix of fine produce. James Birch of Three Rivers featured De Cicco broccoli, a rich-tasting Italian heirloom with many small florets, less compact but much more tender than standard varieties.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
Poly 1, Garfield 0--Mayra Martinez scored in an Invitational semifinal at Garfield. Poly (9-10-2) is seeded No. 13.
HOME & GARDEN
March 24, 2001 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I first sampled sweet leaf (Stevia rebaudiana), I was impressed. Although I'd been told that it's much sweeter than sugar, I didn't expect the intense sensation that filled my mouth when I bit into a leaf. My 5-year-old son, Jeremy, was even more taken with stevia. He immediately claimed it as his favorite plant and proceeded to sample the leaves every day, nearly stripping the plant bare.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2007 | Jude Webber, Financial Times
Placido Osuna points to a crudely stitched scar on his belly and thanks God for the little green herb that his sons encouraged him to grow instead of tobacco and cotton. "Stevia saved my life," says the 68-year-old farmer, dressed in flip-flops and an open shirt, with a machete tucked into his belt.
HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Stevia followers are a diverse bunch, including health nuts and food-industry magnates. The draw? The sweetener is all-natural and naturally calorie-free. But "natural" doesn't necessarily mean safe, and scientists have long struggled to make sense of early evidence hinting that stevia could be toxic. A series of studies published last month in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology put that question to the test for one type of stevia-based sweeteners. Stevia, a South American shrub, has leaves up to 300 times sweeter than table sugar.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2007 | Jude Webber, Financial Times
Placido Osuna points to a crudely stitched scar on his belly and thanks God for the little green herb that his sons encouraged him to grow instead of tobacco and cotton. "Stevia saved my life," says the 68-year-old farmer, dressed in flip-flops and an open shirt, with a machete tucked into his belt.
HEALTH
May 31, 2004 | Elena Conis
Stevia, an extract from a South American shrub, is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar -- and practically calorie free. It's been used for centuries to sweeten herbal teas in South America, and for the last 20 years, it's also been widely used as a commercial sweetener in Japan and Brazil. It's not an approved food additive in the U.S., but it is sold in health food stores as a dietary supplement. * Uses: Stevia is often used as a replacement for sugar.
HOME & GARDEN
March 24, 2001 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I first sampled sweet leaf (Stevia rebaudiana), I was impressed. Although I'd been told that it's much sweeter than sugar, I didn't expect the intense sensation that filled my mouth when I bit into a leaf. My 5-year-old son, Jeremy, was even more taken with stevia. He immediately claimed it as his favorite plant and proceeded to sample the leaves every day, nearly stripping the plant bare.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
Poly 1, Garfield 0--Mayra Martinez scored in an Invitational semifinal at Garfield. Poly (9-10-2) is seeded No. 13.
FOOD
February 28, 2001 | DAVID KARP
The past week's rains made life miserable for farmers market vendors by hindering harvests and discouraging customers. On a wet and windy Saturday, nevertheless, the Santa Monica Organic market drew a steady stream of shoppers who wouldn't miss their fix of fine produce. James Birch of Three Rivers featured De Cicco broccoli, a rich-tasting Italian heirloom with many small florets, less compact but much more tender than standard varieties.
HOME & GARDEN
March 17, 2001
Stevia, better known as sweetleaf, is popular in Asia because its leaves, which are much sweeter than sugar, are used in food, candy and drinks.
HEALTH
August 4, 2012 | By Mary McVean, Los Angeles Times
Here's what Jackie Warner had me eating each day for 10 days. (Not included are water and options for bars and powders.) Breakfast 1 cup of coffee with 1 packet Truvia or stevia and a dash of almond milk, or 1 cup of green tea 1/4 cup oatmeal with 1 walnut 1/2 grapefruit Snack 1 medium apple with 8 almonds Lunch 2 slices whole grain bread 1/4 medium sliced avocado 1 tablespoon mustard ...
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