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Steward Mirror Laboratory

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NEWS
May 11, 1992 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The largest one-piece telescope mirror in the Western Hemisphere has been created here in a revolutionary process that promises to open many windows on the universe. The 6.5-meter slab of glass, about the size of an average living room, is cooling slowly in a unique spinning furnace at the University of Arizona. Astronomers are now starting to turn out huge telescope mirrors that were considered economically and technically impractical just a few years ago.
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NEWS
May 11, 1992 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The largest one-piece telescope mirror in the Western Hemisphere has been created here in a revolutionary process that promises to open many windows on the universe. The 6.5-meter slab of glass, about the size of an average living room, is cooling slowly in a unique spinning furnace at the University of Arizona. Astronomers are now starting to turn out huge telescope mirrors that were considered economically and technically impractical just a few years ago.
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SCIENCE
August 23, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Technicians on Saturday will fire up a furnace in Arizona to more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit to pour glass to fabricate a mirror 27 feet in diameter that will be part of a giant telescope with 10 times the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope. The mirror, which will weigh about 20 tons, will take a full year to polish to within 1/20 the wavelength of light, a tolerance on the scale of about 1 in 10 billion. “Let's imagine you took this mirror and you enlarged it to the physical size of the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1993 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If a single telescope gives astronomers another eye with which to peer into the heavens, two new state-of-the-art telescopes just inaugurated on Mt. Graham may open a window on the universe. One device, an $8-million radio telescope built for Germany's Max Planck Institute, will look at radiation in the Milky Way and other galaxies seeking the molecular dust and cold gases from which stars are born.
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