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Stewart Alsop

BUSINESS
May 14, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apple Computer's new software operating system for the Macintosh computer, introduced with great fanfare at a conference here Monday, was greeted with enthusiasm by analysts and software developers who said Microsoft and the rest of the International Business Machines-compatible personal computer world would now be playing catch-up. The new software, dubbed System 7, has been in the works for three years and is being released a year later than originally promised.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to play midwife at the birth of what is touted as a $3.5-trillion "mega-industry," Apple Computer today will preview its first "personal digital assistant," a hand-held, pen-operated computer that functions like an intelligent note pad. Code-named Newton, the videocassette-sized device will transform a handwritten message into neat block letters and carry out simple instructions.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The personal computer industry has always been a young person's game, played by men and women in their 20s and 30s who fomented a technological revolution in garages and spare bedrooms. But now they're turning middle-aged, and their once-a-year pow-wow, the Agenda Conference, is feeling a bit like the nerd's version of gatherings at the Bohemian Grove, where the once-powerful and the now over-the-hill are all trying to persuade one another other that they still matter.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While computer vendors and industry analysts on Tuesday generally hailed Intel Corp.'s decision to replace defective Pentium chips "no questions asked," it is not clear whether the chip giant has avoided long-term damage to its position as the near-monopoly supplier of personal computer microprocessors. Many observers tend to dismiss the possibility that Intel's market position has been hurt.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intel Chief Executive Andrew S. Grove calls it a "malaise." Industry pundit Stewart Alsop refers to it as an "unsettled feeling." Whatever the terminology, a gathering of personal computer industry executives meeting here this week gave a clear sense that all is not well in the PC kingdom. That's a bit of a paradox. To be sure, the PC business has been hurt by the economic downturn, a brutal price war and the failure of some new products to catch on quickly.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1993
The Business section today introduces a new feature, the Times Board of Advisers, which replaces the Times Board of Economists. Each Sunday, this space will contain an essay by one of six noted outside contributors, in rotation with analytical reports by members of The Times' staff. Here are biographical sketches of the new board members: Michael J. Boskin, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George Bush, will write about the economy. Boskin is Tully M.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The impact of an economic slump on the electronics industry will be very uneven, analysts say, with some sectors and companies continuing to prosper while others suffer severely. Vulnerable companies include the mostly American firms that sell minicomputers, large machines that are being squeezed between powerful desktop systems on the low end and high-performance mainframes and supercomputers on the high end.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after launching the first Next Computer model amid a frenzy of hype--only to see it fail in the marketplace--Steven P. Jobs returned to Symphony Hall here Tuesday with a new series of products and the future of his company hanging in the balance.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
AST Research officials have been a bit touchy about the criticism heaped on the Irvine company a year ago when it plunged into the crowded IBM-compatible personal computer market. As one Wall Street analyst pronounced at the time: "It's a little late." Today, after selling 75,000 personal computers in a single year, AST thinks it may have the last laugh. "Our objective is to be a recognized, major player in the PC market," said AST President Safi Qureshey.
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