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Stewart Blair

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BUSINESS
September 6, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Stewart Blair was a close disciple of John Malone, the forward-thinking chief executive of Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable television company. Throughout the 1980s, the two executives invested in advanced technologies and even built cable systems on foreign soil. But Blair spurned those cutting-edge ventures when he decided to go out on his own.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Stewart Blair was a close disciple of John Malone, the forward-thinking chief executive of Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable television company. Throughout the 1980s, the two executives invested in advanced technologies and even built cable systems on foreign soil. But Blair spurned those cutting-edge ventures when he decided to go out on his own.
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BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | Bloomberg Business News
United Artists Theatre Circuit Inc. said Stewart Blair resigned as chairman, chief executive and president and as a board member of the movie theater operator. The resignation is effective immediately. Blair's departure comes a little over a year since Peter Warzel, United Artists' president and chief operating officer, resigned for personal reasons. Blair, who had been chairman and chief executive, assumed Warzel's duties at the time. Englewood, Colo.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Tri-Star Pictures said Friday that it has ended its ambitious $500-million bid to acquire the nation's largest movie theater chain from United Artists Communications. As reported, the deal appeared to be near collapse in early January, when UA Communications President Stewart Blair said no discussions had taken place for 60 to 90 days.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Tri-Star Pictures' ambitious plan to spend nearly $500 million to acquire a movie-theater chain from United Artists Communications appears to be on the verge of collapse. Stewart Blair, the newly named president and chief executive of United Artists Communications, said in a telephone interview Monday that the two companies have not conferred for at least 60 to 90 days.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1992 | From Reuters
Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable television operator, said Wednesday that it was selling its chain of movie theaters in a move that analysts said was a stronger shift into advanced communications services. Tele-Communications, based in Englewood, Colo., said it would sell United Artists Entertainment Inc. to a Merrill Lynch leveraged buyout fund and the theater company's managers for $680 million.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Debt-laden Turner Broadcasting is dealing 35% of its common stock to cable system operators and financier Kirk Kerkorian in a $550-million bailout that will enable Ted Turner to keep majority control, the firm disclosed Thursday. Fourteen of the nation's largest television cable system operators, along with MGM/UA majority stockholder Kerkorian, agreed in principle to buy a combination of common and non-convertible preferred stock.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Salah M. Hassanein, longtime boss of the nation's largest theater chain, is quitting his job at United Artists Communications, industry sources said Thursday. UA Communications President and Chief Executive Stewart D. Blair declined to comment, and Hassanein could not be reached.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Over the years many film makers, individually or in partnership with other film makers, have launched their own production companies. The hope, always, was to have a freer hand in what they filmed and how they filmed it--and a fairer division of the spoils, if any. What does not come to mind from recent times is an instance of a director graduating from the ranks of film maker and being hired to run somebody else's very large and well-financed production-distribution company.
SPORTS
May 29, 1992 | LARRY STEWART
While the NBA is enjoying prime-time coverage on NBC, the NHL's Stanley Cup finals are tucked away on a pay-cable network. So the NHL's showcase event is going to a limited audience. SportsChannel is carrying the Stanley Cup finals, but hockey fans without cable are out of luck, even if they wouldn't mind paying. So are those whose cable company doesn't offer SportsChannel, such as Cencom and Paragon. Meanwhile, major league baseball has disappeared from network television.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
United Artists Communications and United Cable Television on Wednesday announced an agreement to combine in a new company that would rank as the nation's third-largest cable-TV operator. The merger also strengthened the grip of Tele-Communications, the nation's largest cable operator, which will own 52% of the new entity. The terms of the deal appeared to satisfy some outspoken investors who attacked an earlier merger proposal that would have paid no cash.
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