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Stewart Enterprises Inc

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BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Stewart Enterprises Inc. has signed an agreement to build and operate mortuaries at two Catholic cemeteries in Ventura County. The agreement brings to nine the number of mortuaries to be built by Stewart for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. The Ventura County cemeteries are Assumption Cemetery in Simi Valley and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.
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NEWS
November 13, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Set boldly in the sensitive soil where religion and commerce meet, the first of nine for-profit mortuaries to be operated in cemeteries owned by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles will open for business in the coming weeks. The first-of-its-kind partnership between the nation's largest Catholic archdiocese and Stewart Enterprises Inc., the world's third-largest funeral chain, is churning up controversy even before the dedication ceremony.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Stewart Enterprises Inc. said it acquired Sentinel Cremation Societies Inc., giving it a presence in the California cremation business. The price paid for closely held Sentinel wasn't disclosed. Sentinel owns 13 funeral centers--including 10 Neptune Society Centers--four crematories, two funeral chapels and a cemetery. It operates in San Francisco, San Diego, Sacramento, Oakland, Stockton, San Marcos and Orange County.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Stewart Enterprises Inc. has signed an agreement to build and operate mortuaries at two Catholic cemeteries in Ventura County. The agreement brings to nine the number of mortuaries to be built by Stewart for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. The Ventura County cemeteries are Assumption Cemetery in Simi Valley and Santa Clara Cemetery in Oxnard.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Set boldly in the sensitive soil where religion and commerce meet, the first of nine for-profit mortuaries to be operated in cemeteries owned by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles will open for business in the coming weeks. The first-of-its-kind partnership between the nation's largest Catholic archdiocese and Stewart Enterprises Inc., the world's third-largest funeral chain, is churning up controversy even before the dedication ceremony.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
USAir Group Inc. said Seth Schofield will stay on as chief executive and chairman until the company concludes talks with AMR Corp. and UAL Corp. Schofield announced his resignation in early September. . . . American Airlines Chairman Robert Crandall said he would favor lifting a government ban on complete foreign ownership of U.S. airlines if American carriers could get better access to foreign markets. . . . Stewart Enterprises Inc.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | TED ANTHONY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
History's broom has swept away the names of the fallen Revolutionary War soldiers responsible for Jacob Knorr's cabinet shop becoming a coffin factory on an October day in 1777. Some were British redcoats, others American patriots fighting under Gen. George Washington. They clashed in the Battle of Germantown, just up the cobblestone road from Knorr's firm. From that day forward, the shop found its liveliest business in handling the dead.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1995 | ALAN SAYRE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The business of burial, long the exclusive province of family-owned funeral homes, is undergoing a quiet revolution in the United States with the acquisition of hundreds of homes and cemeteries by chain operators. * And the movement is quickly spreading overseas, where funeral services traditionally cost a fraction of those in the U.S. Service Corp.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | ADAM GELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There are only so many funerals in a town of 2,874 people. So when Bobby Brownfield built an expansive new mortuary in a field by the Dairy Mart and lavished it with cut-glass doors, antiques in its parlors and concrete urns atop the front gate, folks here clucked a little. "I just teased him," recalled Ellice Kidd, an 87-year-old retired contractor who'd prepaid Brownfield for his future embalming and burial. "I said, 'You're spending my money, aren't you?'
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To commit yourself to holding a stock for a year, you've got to believe in the stock. But to commit to holding it for five years, you've got to believe in the business. In compiling a portfolio of 10 growth stocks for the new decade, we asked a group of money managers to adopt a five-year time horizon because we wanted to take factors such as short-term price momentum out of the equation.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Stewart Enterprises Inc. said it acquired Sentinel Cremation Societies Inc., giving it a presence in the California cremation business. The price paid for closely held Sentinel wasn't disclosed. Sentinel owns 13 funeral centers--including 10 Neptune Society Centers--four crematories, two funeral chapels and a cemetery. It operates in San Francisco, San Diego, Sacramento, Oakland, Stockton, San Marcos and Orange County.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The funeral industry's continued good health once seemed as inevitable as, well, death itself. The $14-billion industry's three biggest chains racked up market-beating profits in the 1990s, acquiring almost 50% of Southland funeral homes and about 13% of U.S. mortuaries overall. Investors sent their stock prices soaring, enticed by predictions of a so-called death boom in about a decade when baby boomers start passing away.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | ADAM GELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There are only so many funerals in a town of 2,874 people. So when Bobby Brownfield built an expansive new mortuary in a field by the Dairy Mart and lavished it with cut-glass doors, antiques in its parlors and concrete urns atop the front gate, folks here clucked a little. "I just teased him," recalled Ellice Kidd, an 87-year-old retired contractor who'd prepaid Brownfield for his future embalming and burial. "I said, 'You're spending my money, aren't you?'
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