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Stewart Kwoh

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January 7, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stewart Kwoh had left a message for a friend at United Way. "Oh, Stewart, you won't guess how your name was pronounced this time," she said when she called back. "My secretary says to return this important call from Mr. Stewart at radio station K-W-O-H." Both laughed at the garbling of his venerable Chinese surname. On one level, the anecdote was humorous. But it also was a poignant reminder of the lack of awareness of Asian culture in the American mainstream.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Asian American advocates are urging people who want to sponsor a family member for an immigration visa to apply now, in case Congress eliminates the preferences. The massive immigration bill passed by the Senate in June would no longer allow United States citizens to get green cards for siblings or married adult children. In the House, which is taking a piecemeal approach to immigration reform, a bill has been introduced that would do away with sibling visas. Under both proposals, spouses and unmarried children would still be eligible for green cards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Asian American advocates are urging people who want to sponsor a family member for an immigration visa to apply now, in case Congress eliminates the preferences. The massive immigration bill passed by the Senate in June would no longer allow United States citizens to get green cards for siblings or married adult children. In the House, which is taking a piecemeal approach to immigration reform, a bill has been introduced that would do away with sibling visas. Under both proposals, spouses and unmarried children would still be eligible for green cards.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stewart Kwoh had left a message for a friend at United Way. "Oh, Stewart, you won't guess how your name was pronounced this time," she said when she called back. "My secretary says to return this important call from Mr. Stewart at radio station K-W-O-H." Both laughed at the garbling of his venerable Chinese surname. On one level, the anecdote was humorous. But it also was a poignant reminder of the lack of awareness of Asian culture in the American mainstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
A black-owned newspaper in Los Angeles recently advised its readers that "it's time for blacks to wake up" and stop patronizing the increasing number of stores in their neighborhoods owned by Korean immigrants. "We are asking everyone who reads this paper not to give those Koreans a dime of your money," said a December editorial in "Money Talk News."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three decades ago, Paul Kim was a 15-year-old immigrant from South Korea who barely spoke English; he was living in a small Oklahoma town and wondering what future America held for him. This week, Kim, 44, whose Korean name Myung-Chun means "bright sky," was named a captain in the Los Angeles Police Department--the first Asian to achieve that rank in the city's history.
NEWS
September 27, 1986
Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's formal apology Friday for his observation that racial minorities drag down the education levels of the United States did little to soothe the distress of some Asian-Americans here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001
In "Diversity Isn't Just Skin Deep" (Commentary, Jan. 7), the three scholars (Angela Glover Blackwell, Stewart Kwoh and Manuel Pastor) seek to steer President-elect George W. Bush to the social left as he devises his domestic social policy. Their aim, "promoting equity" in economic, education and legal areas of our society, is noteworthy. Unfortunately, they fail to realize one primary impediment to their scheme: America is a class society. Equity is a nice goal to promote, though it can never be realized in a capitalist society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2000
It was a shame to see that Asian Americans have their self-appointed Jesse Jackson-like spokesman, Stewart Kwoh (Commentary, May 28). He dredges up the Japanese internment story (60 years old), exaggerates human rights abuses of Asian immigrants (comparing them to violations in China) and promotes the same tired victimization theme so common today. Fortunately, most Asian Americans I know, including my wife and relatives, don't think that way. They don't expect America to be perfect and they know that there will always be bigotry, but lacking in self-pity and full of appreciation for the freedoms and opportunities they have found here, they continue to focus on the positives that have helped them become the most successful American minority.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Expressing concerns about a proposal that would restrict the use of Chinese characters on business signs, the Chinese American Civil Rights and Education Foundation held a dinner meeting Monday to discuss the issue. The City Council is scheduled to address the proposal at its Dec. 12 meeting. Between 25 and 30 representatives from restaurants, retail businesses and trading companies attended the meeting, said Francis Hong, one of the founders of the organization that was formed 6 months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
A black-owned newspaper in Los Angeles recently advised its readers that "it's time for blacks to wake up" and stop patronizing the increasing number of stores in their neighborhoods owned by Korean immigrants. "We are asking everyone who reads this paper not to give those Koreans a dime of your money," said a December editorial in "Money Talk News."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1992
The Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission has honored 11 individuals, the district attorney's office and the Southern California Gas Co. with John Anson Ford Awards for their contributions to human relations. The district attorney's office was cited for its Anti-Terrorist Unit's Hate Crime Prosecution Team, and the gas company for its Multicultural Community Issues panel. The individuals honored at the Music Center ceremony Thursday were: County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn; the Rev. James M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1998 | TINI TRAN
The Asian American community will be the subject of a town hall meeting tonight at Cal State Fullerton. The meeting is the fourth forum in the American Dialogue series, created to highlight the issues within a multicultural society. Earlier forums have examined issues in Vietnamese, Latino and African American communities, and drawn audiences of 700 to 800.
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