Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStewart Wallace
IN THE NEWS

Stewart Wallace

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | WILLIAM ALBRIGHT
The Dick being sought in Stewart Wallace's teasingly titled "Where's Dick?" is not Dick Wagner, Dick Strauss or even Dick Rodgers. It's Dick Tracy, and the composers lurking in the wings of this alternative New Vaudeville opera are Steve Sondheim, Lenny Bernstein in his "Trouble in Tahiti" stage, Minimalism Main Man Phil Glass, Johnny Gay of "Beggar's Opera" fame, and generic rock, blues, jazz and even tango tunesmiths. "Where's Dick?" was written on a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, workshopped at Opera/Omaha and given two concert readings at Playwrights Horizons, the noted Off-Broadway theater company.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York.
It is not a nice night, especially for anyone preparing to present an opera portraying the life and assassination of the first well-known gay-activist politician in California. The evening is cold and damp. An interview with composer Stewart Wallace and librettist Michael Korie takes place at a quiet restaurant, a place for the harried composer (who is working day and night finishing the laborious orchestration) and librettist to relax. But it is a tense night, anyway.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York.
It is not a nice night, especially for anyone preparing to present an opera portraying the life and assassination of the first well-known gay-activist politician in California. The evening is cold and damp. An interview with composer Stewart Wallace and librettist Michael Korie takes place at a quiet restaurant, a place for the harried composer (who is working day and night finishing the laborious orchestration) and librettist to relax. But it is a tense night, anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | WILLIAM ALBRIGHT
The Dick being sought in Stewart Wallace's teasingly titled "Where's Dick?" is not Dick Wagner, Dick Strauss or even Dick Rodgers. It's Dick Tracy, and the composers lurking in the wings of this alternative New Vaudeville opera are Steve Sondheim, Lenny Bernstein in his "Trouble in Tahiti" stage, Minimalism Main Man Phil Glass, Johnny Gay of "Beggar's Opera" fame, and generic rock, blues, jazz and even tango tunesmiths. "Where's Dick?" was written on a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, workshopped at Opera/Omaha and given two concert readings at Playwrights Horizons, the noted Off-Broadway theater company.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1995 | Daniel Cariaga
COMMISSIONS: Forty-two American composers and five librettists will benefit from the latest round of grants just announced by the ongoing Meet the Composer/Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest commissioning program. Funded projects cover a wide variety of musical interests and genres.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Chamber opera, once such an important part of American musical life, is dying, the latest issue of Opera News warns us. It's a worry. But maybe not so much here in the American West as on the operatically stodgier East Coast. The Long Beach Opera last month gave the premiere of an important chamber opera, Stewart Wallace's "Hopper's Wife." And here in Santa Fe, opera--grand and chamber-sized alike--seems to blossom as vibrantly in the desert climate as wildflowers.
SPORTS
August 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Rusty Wallace's third victory of the season was almost upstaged Sunday by another collision between Jeff Gordon and Tony Stewart. Wallace, riding with four fresh tires on his Penske Ford, took the lead with 15 laps to go and steadily pulled away from Ricky Rudd's Ford and Bobby Labonte's Pontiac in the Pepsi 400 at Brooklyn, Mich. "I figured I had a first- or second-place car all day," said Wallace, who has won five of his 52 career NASCAR Winston Cup races at Michigan Speedway.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach Opera, the provocative and enterprising small opera company founded by Michael Milenski in 1978, is canceling the rest of its season and finalizing plans to become the resident company of the Richard and Karen Carpenter Performing Arts Center on the campus of Cal State Long Beach next season. Until now, the company had independently produced all its programs at the Long Beach Convention Center, with most in the small Terrace Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Vienna in the late 19th century was addicted to the waltz and schmaltz of operetta. Lovers fell in love dancing to Johann Strauss' melodies. Even Mahler's symphonies were what they were, in part, because he, like everyone else at the time, was a nut for Strauss. But it was a very different Vienna in which Emmerich Kalman wrote "Countess Maritza" in 1924.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1997 | Daniel Cariaga, Daniel Cariaga is The Times' music writer
After months of stasis, Long Beach Opera has resurfaced. Last spring, the company, which first presented opera in the Southland in 1979, suffered a financial crisis and canceled the last two of its three 1996 productions at the Long Beach Convention Center. Then in May, the opera's general director, Michael Milenski, and Cal State Long Beach announced that the company would become an adjunct of the university.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
A powerful new wave of opera combining Chinese and Western music and drama and written by Chinese composers, many of whom have immigrated to the U.S., has swept much of America, as well as parts of Europe and Asia, in the last 15 years. That it has mostly bypassed the major opera companies on our coast may be evidence of nothing more than a collective Pacific Rim ho-hum at a mix that appears old news in these parts. Even so, Stewart Wallace's "The Bonesetter's Daughter," based on Amy Tan's bestselling novel and given its premiere by San Francisco Opera on Saturday night, brought a welcome dose of operatic chinoiserie to the West Coast.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|