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Stickball

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October 18, 2011 | By Baxter Holmes, Los Angeles Times
Bum, bum, bum, bum … As the Choctaw drummer settles into his cadence, nearly 100 men in blood-red shirts, shorts and bandannas huddle around their leader in a darkening high school parking lot beneath the golden glow of a floodlight. "Big night!" James Denson, the team's star player, shouts three times. At 6-foot-3, he's taller than most, a muscular 208 pounds and square-jaw handsome. His team, Beaver Dam, is just minutes away from playing in the championship game of an ancient and violent sport known as stickball, a cousin of lacrosse that is defiantly true to its American Indian roots.
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October 18, 2011 | By Baxter Holmes, Los Angeles Times
Bum, bum, bum, bum … As the Choctaw drummer settles into his cadence, nearly 100 men in blood-red shirts, shorts and bandannas huddle around their leader in a darkening high school parking lot beneath the golden glow of a floodlight. "Big night!" James Denson, the team's star player, shouts three times. At 6-foot-3, he's taller than most, a muscular 208 pounds and square-jaw handsome. His team, Beaver Dam, is just minutes away from playing in the championship game of an ancient and violent sport known as stickball, a cousin of lacrosse that is defiantly true to its American Indian roots.
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NEWS
June 19, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Drenching rain had fallen the night before, and a huge puddle covered half the infield as the players climbed through a hole in the wire fence into the schoolyard in mid-Manhattan. The star home run hitter, a lawyer, was absent because he was stuck in the office with a temporary restraining order. But Jeb, half Labrador retriever, served as substitute fielder, frolicking in the water as the warm-up for the big game began. Steven Beer reared back on the pitcher's mound, an uneven box he had drawn in chalk between two old chewing gum spots on the asphalt.
SPORTS
July 10, 1990 | CURTIS EICHELBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a distance, they looked like kids choosing sides for a pickup game. They wore high-topped sneakers and stretched T-shirts, smiled at their girls and blew bubblegum, spit at insects and even let out an, "Ah, shoot," every once in a while. Up close, however, their graying beards and receding hairlines betrayed them.
SPORTS
July 10, 1990 | CURTIS EICHELBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a distance, they looked like kids choosing sides for a pickup game. They wore high-topped sneakers and stretched T-shirts, smiled at their girls and blew bubblegum, spit at insects and even let out an, "Ah, shoot," every once in a while. Up close, however, their graying beards and receding hairlines betrayed them.
SPORTS
July 20, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Hit-the-fish-on-top-of-the-pole is the most popular game of the 60,000 Cherokee Indians living in Oklahoma's 14 eastern counties. It's an ancient game. No one knows when it started. Today in the Cherokee Nation children play the game, men play against men, men against women, communities challenge communities. Di Las Ka, as the Cherokees call the game, is a spinoff of stickball, perhaps the oldest sport in North America.
SPORTS
July 18, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Hit-the-fish-on-top-of-the-pole is the most popular game of the 60,000 Cherokee Indians living in Oklahoma's 14 eastern counties. It's an ancient game. No one knows when it started. Today in the Cherokee Nation children play the game, men play against men, men against women, communities challenge communities. Di Las Ka, as the Cherokees call the game, is a spinoff of stickball, perhaps the oldest sport in North America.
SPORTS
July 12, 1992
San Diego's Chris Barlow and three others won a 1,000-meter kayak race-off Saturday at Lake Placid, N.Y. and will represent the United States in the event at the Olympics in Barcelona. Barlow, Mark Hamilton of Costa Mesa, Mike Herbert of Rogers, Ark., and Terry Kent of Rochester, N.Y., won the flat-water race in 3 minutes 2.91 seconds.
SPORTS
July 28, 1991 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"OK, guys," said Dennis Bayless, "let's melt some butter." With that, Bayliss grabbed a broomstick, a modified tennis ball--one without the fuzz--and stepped into the middle of Seventh Street and took his at-bat for Hot Buttered Elvis, one of 40 teams competing Saturday amid high-rises in downtown San Diego at the third annual West Coast Stickball Tournament. It's a cross between New York City stickball and West Coast Over-The-Line.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
On stage, Fisher Stevens, a self-described "thin, white Jewish kid from Chicago," has played everything from a WASPy leading man to a thin, white Jewish kid from Brooklyn. But in the movies, Stevens almost never gets to play an American. "I'm like the U.N.," Stevens jokes. "I've played a Mexican photographer, an Israeli soldier, an East Indian scientist. I turned down a part as an Afghani in 'Rambo III' and right after that I was offered a role as a guy from Uruguay.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Drenching rain had fallen the night before, and a huge puddle covered half the infield as the players climbed through a hole in the wire fence into the schoolyard in mid-Manhattan. The star home run hitter, a lawyer, was absent because he was stuck in the office with a temporary restraining order. But Jeb, half Labrador retriever, served as substitute fielder, frolicking in the water as the warm-up for the big game began. Steven Beer reared back on the pitcher's mound, an uneven box he had drawn in chalk between two old chewing gum spots on the asphalt.
SPORTS
July 20, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Hit-the-fish-on-top-of-the-pole is the most popular game of the 60,000 Cherokee Indians living in Oklahoma's 14 eastern counties. It's an ancient game. No one knows when it started. Today in the Cherokee Nation children play the game, men play against men, men against women, communities challenge communities. Di Las Ka, as the Cherokees call the game, is a spinoff of stickball, perhaps the oldest sport in North America.
SPORTS
July 18, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Hit-the-fish-on-top-of-the-pole is the most popular game of the 60,000 Cherokee Indians living in Oklahoma's 14 eastern counties. It's an ancient game. No one knows when it started. Today in the Cherokee Nation children play the game, men play against men, men against women, communities challenge communities. Di Las Ka, as the Cherokees call the game, is a spinoff of stickball, perhaps the oldest sport in North America.
SPORTS
July 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Pete Rose will probably be on crutches when he appears at his sentencing on tax charges Thursday in U.S. District Court. The former Cincinnati Reds manager injured his right knee on Sunday while playing stickball with children at a family reunion in Indiana, his publicist, Barbara Pinzka, said in a prepared statement. Pinzka said Rose is to undergo outpatient arthroscopic surgery Friday. According to Pinzka, orthopedist Dr. S.
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