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Sticker Shock

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FOOD
May 6, 1993 | RUSS PARSONS
A visit to the vegetable department these days is likely to send you into sticker shock. A quick tour around a representative neighborhood supermarket this weekend showed lettuce prices from $1.29 to $1.59 a head; small celery at 99 cents a bunch; cucumbers at 69 cents each (a per-pound price of more than $1); green beans $1.99 a pound; zucchini 99 cents a pound; and asparagus $1.99 a pound. Green bell peppers were $1.99 a pound.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Robin is buying a new car. Like all car buyers, she's done her best to haggle the price down. Now, she says, she's being told that she has to pay sales tax on the full sticker price of the vehicle, rather than the discounted price. Robin asks: Is that kosher? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions When you buy a cellphone in California, you're taxed on the full retail value of the device instead of the much lower subsidized price you actually pay. As for cars, I had to check on this one with the State Board of Equalization.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2010 | By Greg Burns
With the economy and the weather slowly improving, the barbecue grill beckons. But the pork chops could be out of reach. Sticker shock is arriving at a supermarket meat case near you, as cattle, hog and poultry prices soar in speculator-influenced commodity markets. The upturn has put an end to a long downward spiral for livestock producers, who until recently have been losing money on every animal they brought to market. Given the recent strength in retail sales overall, U.S. consumers may be willing to pay a little more for their animal protein.
TRAVEL
September 8, 2013
Question: My husband flew to Denver to participate in a bicycle trip around Yellowstone Park. The round-trip airfare was $422. He suffered a fracture of the pelvis. To get him home from Cody, Wyo., the airline charged us a total of $1,362. I am so stunned that I don't quite know what to say. To me this is a total rip-off, and I really need someone to explain to me why this is OK. Anne L. Stowell Los Angeles Answer: I can explain why this happened, but I cannot explain why it's OK unless I channel the greedmeisters at many U.S. airlines.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Robin is buying a new car. Like all car buyers, she's done her best to haggle the price down. Now, she says, she's being told that she has to pay sales tax on the full sticker price of the vehicle, rather than the discounted price. Robin asks: Is that kosher? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions When you buy a cellphone in California, you're taxed on the full retail value of the device instead of the much lower subsidized price you actually pay. As for cars, I had to check on this one with the State Board of Equalization.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
For many people, a trip to the supermarket has become a perilous journey of navigating aisles of expensive goods and even more expensive goods. And now, it might seem, a villain has been found - weather that has prompted drought conditions and damaged crops in much of the United States. But today's higher prices at the grocery store can't be blamed on current drought conditions. In fact, although the drought could push prices up for consumers on a variety of products, the impact won't be felt for months or even a year.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Convinced that everything you buy these days has a Made-in- China label? Then you aren't paying attention. Things made in the U.S.A. still dominate the American marketplace, according to a new study by economists at the San Francisco Federal Reserve. Goods and services from China accounted for only 2.7% of U.S. personal consumption spending in 2010, according to the report titled "The U.S. Content of 'Made in China.' " About 88.5% of U.S. spending last year was on American-made products and services.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE
How much have prices changed since the 1988 presidential election? With campaign talk these days about low inflation, we expected to see only modest increases. The government pegs the cumulative rate of inflation over the last four years at 17.9%. But a random survey left us with a bad case of sticker shock. The price of Disneyland tickets has galloped ahead of inflation, soaring by more than one-third.
REAL ESTATE
November 5, 1989 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We knew we had really left Los Angeles the first time we skipped down a flight of stairs to examine a finished basement. And the second time and the third and the 14th and 40th times. And we really knew we were back on the Other Coast when we ventured into relatively expansive back yards that were lush and green, sans sprinklers, but also bereft of palms and citrus trees. And, under gray skies, our clothes clung to us with the humidity of it all.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2007 | Diana Dawson, Special to The Times
Before 21-year-old Neel Bhuta spent a semester abroad last year, the New York University economics and history major carefully studied the cost of a beer abroad. In Prague, Czech Republic, $2 was expensive by his standards, even compared with the $8 he would pay in Rome. "One of the reasons I chose to go to school in Prague was that it was not tied to the euro and was going to be a lot cheaper," Bhuta said.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
Boutique Italian race motorcycle manufacturer Aprilia has unveiled a first look at its 2013 RSV4 Factory APRC, a brand-new, high-end superbike to be marketed and sold only in the United States and Canada. The limited-edition bike is based on Aprilia's RSV4, on which Max Biaggi won the World Superbike Championships in 2010 and 2012. Among its features are anti-lock brakes, traction and wheelie controls, improved ergonomics and increased fuel capacity. First units of the 1000cc, 180-plus-horsepower motorcycle will be available at U.S. and Canadian dealers in April.
SPORTS
January 16, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman, Los Angeles Times
Popularity has its price. When Kings fans began to look at ticket prices for Saturday's season opener against Chicago, some registered their discontent via email and/or Twitter. Prices were listed by the team starting in the neighborhood of $155. But the game is sold out, which means the secondary market is surging. At StubHub, for instance, a quick review showed a range from $199 (up high in Section 320) to one ticket down by the glass for nearly $1,500. The Kings recognize the emotions of the issue.
TRAVEL
November 20, 2012 | By Myscha Theriault
If you're traveling solo, maybe you can justify paying a bag fee to check your suitcase. But if you're a family of four and you're flying, say, on United from LAX to Washington's Dulles for the upcoming holidays, you'll pay $25 a bag for each family member's first bag, $35 for each person's second. If you're a family of heavy packers (or you have an infant who requires extra gear), those costs can add up quickly. Those fees don't do your wallet any good, but they do help the airlines: In 2012, revenue from ancillary fees (that includes bags)
NATIONAL
July 18, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
For many people, a trip to the supermarket has become a perilous journey of navigating aisles of expensive goods and even more expensive goods. And now, it might seem, a villain has been found - weather that has prompted drought conditions and damaged crops in much of the United States. But today's higher prices at the grocery store can't be blamed on current drought conditions. In fact, although the drought could push prices up for consumers on a variety of products, the impact won't be felt for months or even a year.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
New federal regulations aimed at giving airline passengers the true price of their tickets when booking a flight may provide some travelers with an unpleasant surprise. The U.S. Transportation Department rules that took effect Thursday require airlines to include all mandatory taxes and fees in their advertised prices. But travel experts say the rules may have the unintended effect of reducing airline ticket sales by scaring away passengers with prices that suddenly seem much higher than in the past.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Convinced that everything you buy these days has a Made-in- China label? Then you aren't paying attention. Things made in the U.S.A. still dominate the American marketplace, according to a new study by economists at the San Francisco Federal Reserve. Goods and services from China accounted for only 2.7% of U.S. personal consumption spending in 2010, according to the report titled "The U.S. Content of 'Made in China.' " About 88.5% of U.S. spending last year was on American-made products and services.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Air Force Wednesday apparently failed to win new Capitol Hill converts for its $70-billion stealth bomber program. Instead, the service learned that congressional "sticker shock" could kill or cripple the program before it has completed its first round of tests. The Pentagon's proposed yearly bill for the bomber soon will surpass the annual defense budgets of all but 12 nations in the world. The annual cost by 1992 is expected to hit $8 billion. The $4.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1995 | GERI COOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many of us, this is the one time of year when we are faced with purchasing toys. Because we do this so infrequently, there is the inevitable sticker shock when we go shopping. So for those seeking some comfort and joy this holiday season, especially those who belong to an organization, there is good news to report: The prices at L.E.C. World Traders in Burbank won't shock you, I promise.
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