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Stickleback Fish

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports.
Supervisors promised to find ways to prevent permanent closing of Lompoc-Casmalia Road, the first in the nation to be declared a habitat for an endangered species of fish. The road, which stretches from the main entrance of Vandenberg Air Force Base to the community of Casmalia, repeatedly floods where it crosses San Antonio Creek. It was declared a habitat for the unarmored three-spine stickleback fish after 1995 floodwaters wiped out a bridge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports.
Supervisors promised to find ways to prevent permanent closing of Lompoc-Casmalia Road, the first in the nation to be declared a habitat for an endangered species of fish. The road, which stretches from the main entrance of Vandenberg Air Force Base to the community of Casmalia, repeatedly floods where it crosses San Antonio Creek. It was declared a habitat for the unarmored three-spine stickleback fish after 1995 floodwaters wiped out a bridge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against Mobil Oil Corp. for a 74,634-gallon oil spill in Valencia last year that killed 186 birds and damaged the habitat of two endangered species in the Santa Clara River. Mobil, the country's second-biggest oil company, faces a maximum penalty of $497,000 if convicted on two felony counts of illegally disposing of hazardous waste and two misdemeanor counts of polluting a waterway, said Deputy Dist. Atty. David H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years after the unarmored threespine stickleback landed on the federal list of endangered species, the beleaguered little fish continues to occupy a stretch of the Santa Clara River that runs through Soledad Canyon, just outside Santa Clarita. But after more than three decades of federal protection, the stickleback faces a whole new set of threats, as well as most of those that endangered the fish in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny, endangered fish found in the Santa Clarita Valley, which is besieged by development and natural predators, is facing two more threats that could hasten its extinction. Biologists fear the fifth year of severe drought, combined with the recent spill of 75,000 gallons of crude oil into the Santa Clara River, could destroy the shrinking habitat of the unarmored three-spined stickleback. Biologists believe the Santa Clarita Valley may be the dwindling stickleback's last refuge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years after the unarmored threespine stickleback landed on the federal list of endangered species, the beleaguered little fish continues to occupy a stretch of the Santa Clara River that runs through Soledad Canyon, just outside Santa Clarita. But after more than three decades of federal protection, the stickleback faces a whole new set of threats, as well as most of those that endangered the fish in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco International Airport could face fines and stricter oversight after suspicious runoff spilled into the San Francisco Bay in December. The spill showed traces of cyanide and may have violated a pollution cease-and-desist order by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board. Airport spokesman Ron Wilson said no cyanide is kept at the airport, and the reading probably is a false positive. "It was properly treated material that entered the bay," Wilson said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1985 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
The district attorney's office Friday charged a truck driver with dumping gasoline into a storm drain near Acton that empties into the Santa Clarita River, home of an endangered species of fish. Randy A. Gregg, 39, of Sunnymead, near Riverside, faces one misdemeanor count each under the California penal code, the state health and safety code and the state fish and game code, said Al Albergate, a spokesman for the district attorney's office. 40 Gallons Allegedly Dumped On Jan.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2004 | Rosie Mestel, Time Staff Writer
Biologists have found that one small change in a fish gene makes a significant difference in the size of its fins -- a rare textbook example of how abrupt evolutionary changes can occur. The scientists, whose report was published in the current issue of Nature, studied different types of threespine stickleback fish. Marine populations of sticklebacks have large, spiky fins on their undersides to protect them from the gaping jaws of predators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993
Mobil Oil Co. pleaded no contest Monday to a criminal misdemeanor charge involving a January, 1991, oil spill from a chronically leaky pipeline in Valencia and agreed to contribute $200,000 to environmental projects. Although the plea entered in Los Angeles Municipal Court resolved the criminal case against Mobil, the oil giant still faces a state civil suit over the pipeline rupture, which spilled nearly 75,000 gallons of sticky crude into the Santa Clara River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against Mobil Oil Corp. for a 74,634-gallon oil spill in Valencia last year that killed 186 birds and damaged the habitat of two endangered species in the Santa Clara River. Mobil, the country's second-biggest oil company, faces a maximum penalty of $497,000 if convicted on two felony counts of illegally disposing of hazardous waste and two misdemeanor counts of polluting a waterway, said Deputy Dist. Atty. David H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny, endangered fish found in the Santa Clarita Valley, which is besieged by development and natural predators, is facing two more threats that could hasten its extinction. Biologists fear the fifth year of severe drought, combined with the recent spill of 75,000 gallons of crude oil into the Santa Clara River, could destroy the shrinking habitat of the unarmored three-spined stickleback. Biologists believe the Santa Clarita Valley may be the dwindling stickleback's last refuge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992
The district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against Mobil Oil for a 74,634-gallon oil spill in Valencia last year that killed 186 birds and damaged the habitat of two endangered species in the Santa Clara River. Mobil faces a maximum penalty of $497,000 if convicted on two felony counts of illegally disposing of hazardous waste and two misdemeanor counts of polluting a waterway, said Deputy Dist. Atty. David Guthman. The company has spent $10 million to clean up the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2004 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
The city of Santa Clarita has sued Los Angeles County over a massive sand and gravel mine proposed for east of the city, alleging the county's approval of the project violated California environmental quality laws. The lawsuit, filed Friday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, opens a new legal front in the bitter fight over the mine, which is opposed by numerous civic groups and local governments in north Los Angeles County.
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