Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStieg Larsson
IN THE NEWS

Stieg Larsson

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stieg Larsson Our Days in Stockholm: A Memoir of a Friendship Kurdo Baksi, translated from the Swedish by Laurie Thompson Pegasus Books: 144 pp., $22 What does a writer leave behind? Unfinished work, clues about the creation of his characters, experiences that worked their way into his writing. And, like everyone else, relationships. Kurdo Baksi met Stieg Larsson (author of the trilogy that begins with "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo") in 1992. Larsson was 38 and editor of the leftist magazine Expo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo A Parody Lars Arffssen St. Martin's/Griffin: 201 pp., $9.99 paper In "The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo," somebody's strangling female reindeer all over Sweden. These strange deaths are somehow tied to the decapitation murders of two writers: the author of a bestselling book on Baltic sturgeon and a thriller writer with a manuscript that reveals the Nazi origins of furniture giant UKEA. Got that? As for the Swedish authorities, they think a single culprit is responsible, someone described as "a psychopathic serial killer who's probably also a world-class surgeon … or an experienced samurai warrior.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Evelyn McDonnell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To be a widow is tragic; to be a widow without portfolio is a nightmare. On Nov. 9, 2004, Swedish architect Eva Gabrielsson lost the man she had loved for 32 years; with whom she had partnered and cohabited; with whom she had been designing their dream cottage, where they were to spend the rest of their summers together. She and Stieg Larsson never married, but that seemed an unimportant formality compared with their deep experience together — especially in Sweden, that iconic polity of progressive, feminist values.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011
'There Are Things I Want You To Know' About Stieg Larsson and Me Eva Gabrielsson with Marie-Françoise Colombani, Seven Stories Press: 212 pages, $23.95
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2010 | By Richard Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's an authentic phenomenon. As "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest," the last of three posthumous thrillers by the Swedish writer Stieg Larsson, goes on sale this week in the United States, his books have already sold 40 million copies worldwide in a mere five years, while the modestly mounted movie version of his first title has already grossed something like $100 million, with talk of remaking these Swedish productions in Hollywood versions....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2008 | Marjorie Miller, Times Staff Writer
Stieg Larsson's debut crime novel, "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," leaves you wanting more from an odd investigative duo. The good news is that this is the first of his "Millennium" trilogy -- there are two more completed books to come -- but there's also bad news: Larsson died of a heart attack in 2004 at 50 before the mysteries were published, a premature end to a budding talent. There is a lot of buzz in Europe about these books, as there is about a whole slew of Scandinavian thrillers, and Larsson's rising reputation has preceded U.S. publication of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Lewis Beale
When a team of Swedish producers known for their TV crime dramas asked Danish director Niels Arden Oplev if he'd be interested in helming their next project, his immediate response was "Haven't you made enough of those?" But this was to be no ordinary felony flick. This was the film version of author Stieg Larsson's international bestseller "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." And after reading the dense, engrossing tale of mass murder, business skulduggery and violence against women that features the oddball pairing of a disgraced, womanizing male journalist and an angry female punk computer hacker, Oplev was hooked.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo A Parody Lars Arffssen St. Martin's/Griffin: 201 pp., $9.99 paper In "The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo," somebody's strangling female reindeer all over Sweden. These strange deaths are somehow tied to the decapitation murders of two writers: the author of a bestselling book on Baltic sturgeon and a thriller writer with a manuscript that reveals the Nazi origins of furniture giant UKEA. Got that? As for the Swedish authorities, they think a single culprit is responsible, someone described as "a psychopathic serial killer who's probably also a world-class surgeon … or an experienced samurai warrior.
WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Henry Chu
Not even Stieg Larsson could've dreamed up "The Girl Who Fought for a Share of the Inheritance." But five years after his untimely death and millions of book sales later, the Swedish crime writer's estate is caught in a bitter feud worthy of one of his thrillers, complete with a strong-willed female protagonist, a murky bog of possible villains and a plot that has transfixed this Scandinavian country. It's a saga of love, literature and the law. Of blood versus bond, pitting Larsson's relatives against his lifelong companion for control of a posthumous publishing juggernaut that shows no sign of slowing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2009 | Daniel Mallory
Already, a nimbus of legend surrounds the story: In late 2004, Swedish journalist Stieg Larsson delivered to his publisher three finished manuscripts -- the opening salvos in a rumored 10-part suspense narrative.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stieg Larsson Our Days in Stockholm: A Memoir of a Friendship Kurdo Baksi, translated from the Swedish by Laurie Thompson Pegasus Books: 144 pp., $22 What does a writer leave behind? Unfinished work, clues about the creation of his characters, experiences that worked their way into his writing. And, like everyone else, relationships. Kurdo Baksi met Stieg Larsson (author of the trilogy that begins with "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo") in 1992. Larsson was 38 and editor of the leftist magazine Expo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
During the Toronto International Film Festival, a Hollywood manager, an up-and-coming director and some executives from the Weinstein Co. had gathered for dinner at the city's Windsor Arms Hotel. It appeared to be a typical movie-business gathering ? except that most of the people at the table were speaking with Swedish accents. The diners were celebrating Weinstein's upcoming U.S. release of "Snabba Cash," a Swedish crime drama that created a sensation among American distributors when it premiered at the Berlin Film Festival this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest," the final book in the late Stieg Larsson's international bestselling Millennium Trilogy, the Swedish author torques up the mental chess and tones down the action. And so it is in the film from director Daniel Alfredson, who delivers an extremely satisfying ending to the story of Lisbeth Salander, the tough Swedish cyber punk that actress Noomi Rapace has turned into an iconic New Age heroine. Alfredson, who picked up directing duties with the second installment, "The Girl Who Played With Fire," uses the tonal switch to get us far closer to the enigma of a character so burned by life, so darkly brooding, that she keeps human connections and communication to a maddening minimum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Massive, worldwide success often remains a bit enigmatic, but this publishing breakthrough seemed especially unlikely. The first novel begins with the dull thud of a family tree full of foreign names: The book starts slowly ? digging into arcane corporate finances ? and the ensuing novels get longer, sometimes nearly skidding to a halt while recounting the structure of a government bureau. The books' politics are radical-feminist and anti-capitalist left, they're set in a country most Americans have never visited and the prose is translated, at times inelegantly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
In her native Sweden, actress Noomi Rapace has, as she says, lost her freedom. "Everybody knows me. If I was sitting like this," she said, glancing around the dimly lighted lobby of the Chateau Marmont during a recent trip to Hollywood, "people would be looking and somebody would come and ask for an autograph and people would probably be listening to us and what we're saying. I can't really just go out in Stockholm. I have to have a car waiting. I can't take the bus. It's not possible anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Early in the movie "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," central character Lisbeth Salander is bound and raped by her legal guardian. It's a harrowing scene from the first tale in novelist Stieg Larsson's so-called Millennium Trilogy that was nearly as difficult to film as it is to watch. Peter Andersson, the actor cast as the guardian, couldn't bring himself to manhandle Salander, who is played in all three of the crime-story film adaptations by Noomi Rapace. The petite, 30-year-old Swedish actress kept encouraging Andersson to dispense with any gentle stagecraft, worried that audiences would think the impending sexual violence wasn't authentic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010
Fiction 1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson ($14.95) 2.The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson ($15.95) 3.Little Bee by Chris Cleave ($14) 4.Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann ($15) 5.The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan ($7.99) 6. A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick ($14.95) 7. The Battle of the Labyrinth by Rick Riordan ($7.99) 8. The Last Song by Nicholas Sparks ($7.99)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|