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Stiff Upper Lip

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
There's nothing like a British farce to make you feel stubbornly, even condescendingly American. Oh, the English, with their love of bawdy adolescent silliness -- clearly the Freudian flip-side of a stiff-upper-lip severity. As for the French door-slamming variety, it could have even the most cosmopolitan among us reminiscing about freedom fries. Of course, screwball can be delightful, but the zaniness is at its fizzy best when served up by larger-than-life personalities, not mathematically organized by the theatrical equivalent of an air traffic controller.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
While most American reality game shows are based on European models, back in 2005 the BBC reversed the westward flow with a London take on NBC's "The Apprentice." Now that version, currently in its fifth season and featuring self-made billionaire Sir Alan Sugar in the role of Donald Trump, is getting a belated stateside rebroadcast. Slightly rechristened "The Apprentice UK," it premieres tonight on BBC America.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Tim Henman's rain-delayed, nail-biting quest for a shot at the Wimbledon title ended in defeat Sunday, British tennis fans let out a collective sigh of resignation mixed with relief. Three days of hoping against hope had come to naught. At least the wait was over. "The capacity to live with disappointment is an essential requirement of followers of British sport," the Independent on Sunday newspaper said. And that was before Henman lost the Wimbledon semifinals to Croatian Goran Ivanisevic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2000 | By SANDY MASUO
** 1/2 AC/DC, "Stiff Upper Lip," Elektra. On a good day, AC/DC rocks harder than most bands young or old. On a bad day, it still rocks harder, only less memorably. The group's latest can't top "Back in Black" or "Highway to Hell" in terms of album achievements, but the standout tracks ("Stiff Upper Lip," "All Screwed Up") are quintessential collisions between crisp playing, meaty grooves and saucy double entendres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1988
I, too, got out of dissecting a frog in high school. Unlike Graham, however, I didn't think to contact my lawyer--I simply cut the class and took my D with a stiff upper lip. I'd love to say that my moral convictions wouldn't allow me to take a knife to a poor, innocent froggie--but let's face it: I just didn't want to see the Technicolor mess inside. I was, and am, squeamish--not saintly. Happily, this hasn't prevented me from participating fully in life, or from receiving an A in college animal biology.
SPORTS
September 19, 2000 | DAVE DESMOND
Quarterback Terry Furlow of Palmdale is keeping a stiff upper lip and an even stiffer lower lip. On the third play of the season, Furlow had his lower lip split open against Barstow, but he remained in the game to lead the Falcons to a 14-12 victory. Furlow's numbers weren't great. He completed six of 17 passes for 111 yards. But it wasn't bad considering Palmdale coaches said they could see Furlow's teeth through a gaping hole in his lip.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1985
Apropos the recent John Horn article "Gunfight at the Writers Guild Corral" (Sept. 1), and in order to help everyone keeps things in a proper perspective, I write to point out that all writers' guilds are subject to periodic seizures. I suppose this is because writers are naturally convulsive (particularly comedy writers: Don't they have us all in fits?). Of the three guilds of which I have good knowledge (the Writers Guild of Great Britain, Writers Guild of America, West and the Australian Writers Guild)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | GENE SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As we've lately come to realize, it's harder to look up to the skies and dream beautiful dreams when those same skies are capable of delivering man-made destruction. So one can understand the no-nonsense skepticism chilling the fantasy life of Jane, a gritty young girl struggling to keep watch over her little brother, Danny, while making her way through London streets bruised by bombs during World War II. Her father's away fighting the good fight while her mother ...
BUSINESS
April 12, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
Diane Krup spent more than $200,000 four years ago to buy a small shop in San Juan Capistrano that sells British foods and knickknacks. Then the recession hit. Krup hasn't taken a salary in over a year, and she has been steadily losing money for months. She expects to be out of business soon. "Where's my bailout?" Krup, 49, wants to know. "I'm not asking for a golden handshake. I'm not asking for a lot of money. But there needs to be some way to help small businesses during times like this."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Pitted against edgy procedurals, trendy reality shows or ensemble dramas, NBC's "Law & Order" for nearly 20 years has persevered as one of TV's most recognizable and durable brands. And if it lasts a few more seasons, the hybrid cop-and-lawyer series would eclipse "Gunsmoke" as television's longest-running drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
OUR FASCINATION with the British is Oedipal. "Murdering the King's English," my New England grandmother used to mutter in the face of bad grammar. (Clearly, it made no impression on me.) In her first book "The Anglo Files: A Field Guide to the British," Sarah Lyall -- who moved to London in the mid-1990s as a correspondent for the New York Times and married British writer-editor Robert McCrum -- tracks the odd and endearing behaviors that help us measure our own quirks and cultural obsessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
There's nothing like a British farce to make you feel stubbornly, even condescendingly American. Oh, the English, with their love of bawdy adolescent silliness -- clearly the Freudian flip-side of a stiff-upper-lip severity. As for the French door-slamming variety, it could have even the most cosmopolitan among us reminiscing about freedom fries. Of course, screwball can be delightful, but the zaniness is at its fizzy best when served up by larger-than-life personalities, not mathematically organized by the theatrical equivalent of an air traffic controller.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
The Queen of England has her own YouTube channel now, the Royal Channel (The Official Channel of the British Monarchy), located at www.youtube. com/theroyalchannel. If you go there hoping to see Her Royal Highness demonstrate a rude noise she can make, or the Prince of Wales begging in tears for everyone to leave Jamie Lynn Spears alone, or some unfunny comedy short princes William and Harry made, you will be sorely disappointed.
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Maybe you've gotten your fill of Takeru Kobayashi. Apparently so has the satirical website TheOnion.com, which last week "reported" the eating champion's retirement. "Mere hours after eating what he claims to be his 'farewell meal' Tuesday, longtime consumer of comestible goods Takeru Kobayashi formally announced that, after a career that has spanned nearly his entire lifetime, he has decided to walk away from eating food.
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Maybe you've gotten your fill of Takeru Kobayashi. Apparently so has the satirical website TheOnion.com, which last week "reported" the eating champion's retirement. "Mere hours after eating what he claims to be his 'farewell meal' Tuesday, longtime consumer of comestible goods Takeru Kobayashi formally announced that, after a career that has spanned nearly his entire lifetime, he has decided to walk away from eating food.
SPORTS
November 27, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the close shave Sunday night, there was a closer shave in the hotel room of Mike Lansford. With a few flicks of a razor blade, the mustache that had drooped behind Lansford's Ram face mask since 1982 was gone. Just like the New Orleans Saints a few hours later. "I did a commercial, a public service announcement," Lansford said, "and I got to looking at my face in the mirror. 'Y'know, that mustache is getting ratty. It's time to clean it up.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
THE critic Kenneth Tynan famously described John Gielgud as "the finest actor on Earth from the neck up." The remark, a backhanded compliment if ever there was one, suggested that Gielgud's velvety voice and supple mind -- best in the business though they were -- didn't amount to a complete definition of the art of acting. Tynan, being Tynan, was forever railing against the British tradition of drawing-room chat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2006 | Hector Becerra and Juliet Chung, Times Staff Writers
Passengers on the first flight to leave London for Los Angeles after the terrorism arrests in England understandably departed with some trepidation. But by the time they arrived at Los Angeles International Airport on Thursday afternoon to a throng of TV cameras and reporters, most passengers aboard British Airways Flight 279 had generally positive things to say about their journey. "It was intense, but it wasn't that traumatic," said Stacey Navarro, 17, a senior at Cathedral City High School.
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