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Stigma

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NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Whenever there's a horrific crime or misdeed, people who belong to one minority group or another can't help hoping that the perpetrator isn't one of their own. And if it is, they cringe, often feeling vaguely and irrationally embarrassed, and certain that this act reflects poorly on their entire group. So it was on Friday, for me and my fellow introverts, when it was reported that James Holmes, the suspect in the almost inconceivable shooting at a midnight screening of the new Batman movie, is a loner.
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OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By Nathalia Holt
It was a chilly spring day in Washington when Secretary of Health and Human Services Margaret Heckler made a historic announcement. "The probable cause of AIDS has been found," she began, "a variant of a known human cancer virus. " It was 1984, and she confidently declared that a vaccine would be available within two years. It was a statement of hope rather than science. Researchers in France and the United States had discovered what was behind the AIDS epidemic, and the news was not as promising as Heckler would have the public believe.
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NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Public perception of mental illness and addiction has changed significantly -- and for the good -- in the last 15 years. That doesn't mean, however, that people feel comfortable working or living near or being friends with someone with mental illness, according to a major new survey. The study compared people's responses to vignettes involving mental illness and addiction to gauge public understanding of the illness and feelings toward those who are ill or addicted. The surveys took place in 1996 and 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
To say the NC-17 rating has fallen short of its ambitions is like saying the Marquis de Sade might have had a bit of a dirty mind. Launched 23 years ago with high hopes that, as a designation of explicit but sophisticated fare, it could break the porn stigma of the X, the NC-17-soon lost all credibility. These days, studio movies get chopped down so they can wriggle in under the R, or if they're independent films that don't need to be rated, they just go out unrated, as we explored in this story last year.
SPORTS
August 2, 1986
Chris Dufresne's commentary ("Adults Interfering With Kids' Sports Can Have Deadly Effects") was painful reading. It left me wondering how many kids have had to grow up with the stigma of failure because they didn't live up to their parents' unreasonable expectations of athletic excellence. I see Harold's story as part of a larger tragedy: So many parents force their dreams on their children, instead of helping their children pursue dreams of their own. DAVE GNERRE Fontana
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1989 | MARK S. GOULSTON, Mark S. Goulston is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute
The American Psychiatric Assn. is meeting in San Francisco this week, and the theme of the conference is "Overcoming Stigma." It is an important topic not only for the mentally ill and those who treat them, but for all of us. In the time it takes for you to read this, more people than you could imagine will be stigmatized--possibly for life. Many who carry a stigma are people who would not usually be thought of as having one. But consider stigma as a way of regarding people as different and to justify treating them differently.
NEWS
August 17, 2002 | KAREN R. POMER
Jacqueline Marris and Tamara Brooks are my new heroines. These two brave Southern California teenagers not only acted to survive their ordeal but also made an important decision to speak out on national television after their kidnapping and rape Aug. 1. With the loving support of their families, they performed a great service to rape survivors everywhere by refusing to be shamed into silence. Their act of courage, of course, does not mean that the stigma surrounding rape is fading.
SPORTS
June 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
A University of Georgia faculty committee investigating allegations made by assistant developmental studies Prof. Jan Kemp against the Athletic Assn. suggested that the university do away with the developmental studies program and incorporate remedial courses into traditional academic departments. After interviewing 32 people during the last month, the two-member athlete review subcommittee concluded that the university investigate "the possibility that the developmental studies program be eliminated" because of the "social-academic stigma attached to students enrolled in developmental studies."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1997
Re "Dignity Card Helps Strip the Stigma From Food Stamp Use," Nov. 23: The issue of whether there should be any stigma attached to receiving food stamps and welfare is one that has been and will be debated for a long time. I just want to know how someone can be on "temporary" assistance for more than five years. Maybe the "Dignity Card" should be renamed the California Electronic Permanent Assistance Card. Most jobs today don't last five years. Why should someone receive "temporary" assistance that long?
HEALTH
October 15, 2001
My thanks to Melissa Healy for a comprehensive and empathetic story about depression ("In Depression's Shadow," Sept. 17). Every story of this kind helps break down the stigma and hopefully encourages more people to seek help. It is not a personal weakness to have depression. CELINDA JUNGHEIM Marina del Rey
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Is wearing a kimono as a Halloween costume offensive ? Pottery Barn withdrew two costumes it had marketed - a kimono and sushi chef - after objections from Asian American groups. It's related to a larger campaign against ethnic costuming that was started by Ohio University students several years ago, using the motto "We're a culture, not a costume” and advising people who would buy outfits such as kimonos or sombreros,  "You wear the costume for one night. I wear the stigma for life.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2013 | Jessica Guynn
On a recent afternoon, Homer Gaines hiked with girlfriend Tami Stillwell to the gusty peak of Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay, bent down on one knee and slipped a topaz and white-sapphire ring on her finger, capturing the entire marriage proposal on a computerized device that he was wearing like a pair of glasses. Gaines, a 41-year-old Web developer from Fort Myers, Fla., is one of 10,000 "explorers" testing Glass, the much talked about hands-free wearable computing device from Google that lets users take photos and videos, make phone calls, send and receive text messages, search the Internet and get turn-by-turn directions.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - In rural areas of India, many villagers still believe mental illness is caused by evil spirits angry that the sick person had killed a cow during a past life. So-called therapy, conducted by witch doctors or family members, can include chaining up the mentally ill, chanting spells, poking them with pins, or beating them "to force the spirits out. " "There's little awareness that it's a real illness," said Dr. Indira Sharma, Varanasi-based president of the Indian Psychiatric Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | Sandy Banks
Hope was the theme of the day, but unremitting pain was the backdrop when friends and family members of suicide victims gathered in a Culver City park on Saturday for their annual summer potluck. "Survivors After Suicide" they call themselves. It's a label with two meanings: They survived unthinkable, unbearable loss. And some, in the aftermath, contemplated or attempted suicide themselves. These survivors share a singular sort of grief - one that binds them inexorably to guilt, confusion and shame.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
When she was 16, Anne Hathaway decided she was a failure. Tara Lipinski, the figure skater only five months her senior, had recently won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics. And Hathaway was being rejected by nearly every casting director she auditioned for. "She started crying and told her father and I that she couldn't even land a Clearasil commercial while Tara had a gold medal," Hathaway's mother, Kate, recalled. She and Anne's father tried to ease their daughter's anxiety but quietly took pride in her resolve.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Whenever there's a horrific crime or misdeed, people who belong to one minority group or another can't help hoping that the perpetrator isn't one of their own. And if it is, they cringe, often feeling vaguely and irrationally embarrassed, and certain that this act reflects poorly on their entire group. So it was on Friday, for me and my fellow introverts, when it was reported that James Holmes, the suspect in the almost inconceivable shooting at a midnight screening of the new Batman movie, is a loner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993
I want to protest the media's implication that manic-depressive illness could be the cause of Mark Richard Hilbun's alleged crimes. Millions of Americans have experienced and been treated for mental illness, and only a tiny fraction of them have ever committed crimes against themselves or others. I believe that criminal acts demonstrate character defects and that mental illness is only ancillary to crime. The stigma of having been mentally ill continues to poison the lives of millions of innocent people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1993
Accolades, commendations, praises and a 21-gun salute for Walsh. We have all too few men with his integrity, clear conception of right and wrong, and the tenacity to follow through in spite of stupendous odds against him. While our President's cover-up pardons will forever bear the stigma of malfeasance, Walsh will go down in history as one of the truly noble men of our period. DOROTHEA C. HILL Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore, Special to the Los Angeles Times
GIFU, Japan - Hidden away in the backroom of a modest apartment in this central Japanese city, one of Japan's last remaining hand-tattoo masters is preparing his tools. Over the last four decades Oguri Kazuo has tattooed notable geisha and countless yakuza , members of Japan's notorious mafia. Today, the 79-year-old artist, known professionally as Horihide (derived from " hori ," meaning "to carve"), is working on a client who is a little more subdued. Motoyama Tetsuro has spent hundreds of dollars, traveled thousands of miles and waited more than three decades for a session with Horihide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2011 | Sandy Banks
It's been so long, I can't even remember what the column was about or how I'd drawn the ire of the reader who mailed me in response. She was — like me — black, middle-aged and middle-class, and she disagreed vehemently with whatever I'd said that week. She threw down the gauntlet with her closing remark: "I can tell; you're one of those women with a white boyfriend. " I was pleased to be able to rally back: "My boyfriend is black. " Take that. But I was also grateful that her challenge hadn't come the year before.
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