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NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Pregnant women with syphilis can pass the disease to their developing baby, and for many babies in the womb, the outcome is death. But a simple screening test and treatment could be a cheap way to cut such stillbirths and deaths, British scientists reported Thursday.  That study holds immense promise, especially for women in the developing world. Another new study related to stillbirths -- and the potential risk based on maternal sleeping position -- is much less conclusive. In the first report, an analysis of 10 studies, researchers concluded that offering screening and treatment for syphilis could cut stillbirths and early neonatal deaths by more than half.
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NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Pregnant women with syphilis can pass the disease to their developing baby, and for many babies in the womb, the outcome is death. But a simple screening test and treatment could be a cheap way to cut such stillbirths and deaths, British scientists reported Thursday.  That study holds immense promise, especially for women in the developing world. Another new study related to stillbirths -- and the potential risk based on maternal sleeping position -- is much less conclusive. In the first report, an analysis of 10 studies, researchers concluded that offering screening and treatment for syphilis could cut stillbirths and early neonatal deaths by more than half.
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HEALTH
April 14, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
At least 2.6 million fetuses die worldwide after the 28th week of pregnancy every year, a number that has declined only modestly in recent years, researchers said Wednesday. Fully half of those stillbirths occur during delivery, in large part because women do not receive adequate medical care during the event, according to the first comprehensive study of the problem, reported in six papers and eight commentaries in the journal Lancet. The number of stillbirths could be reduced by 45% by 2015 in the most affected countries at a cost of only $2.32 per person by such simple expedients as improving obstetric care; treating syphilis infections and hypertension in pregnant women; and identifying and treating medical conditions that block fetal growth, experts said.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Stillborn births aren’t declining very much. More than 2 million babies are stillborn worldwide every year, and almost 26,000 of them are in the U.S., reported researchers in a comprehensive series on fetal deaths in The Lancet .  Poor medical care is a big factor in areas like sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where three-quarters of the deaths occur.  But in high-income countries like the U.S. -- where 1 in 200 babies who...
NEWS
November 4, 1992
I was delighted to see the excellent article (on pre-pregnancy care), with the exception of the matter of reducing alcoholic intake. All major health associations agree with total abstinence from all alcohol. Even social drinking (one or two drinks a day) increases the incidence of miscarriage and stillbirths. DR. JOKICHI TAKAMINE Los Angeles
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Stillborn births aren’t declining very much. More than 2 million babies are stillborn worldwide every year, and almost 26,000 of them are in the U.S., reported researchers in a comprehensive series on fetal deaths in The Lancet .  Poor medical care is a big factor in areas like sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where three-quarters of the deaths occur.  But in high-income countries like the U.S. -- where 1 in 200 babies who...
NEWS
June 14, 1985 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
The neonatalogists at UC Irvine Medical Center thought they had an epidemic on their hands. Three babies were stillborn because of a rare infection of Listeria monocytogenes. Four more were born with it, and two of them died--one just minutes after birth, the other just 10 hours after the infection was diagnosed. Another baby, born at L.A. County-USC Medical Center and diagnosed as having the same bacterial infection, was transferred to UCI's neonatal intensive care unit in Orange.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An abortion clinic surrendered its license Wednesday amid allegations that a woman delivered a nearly full-term stillborn baby after a staff member gave her an abortion-inducing drug without a doctor present. Summit Medical Center in Birmingham has been closed since the Alabama Department of Public Health suspended its operations May 17, citing numerous violations of health rules, said Rick Harris, director of the state agency's Bureau of Health Provider Standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996
An autopsy Friday revealed that a newborn boy found in Monterey Park was a natural stillbirth, and officials said the mentally disabled woman who gave birth to him will not be prosecuted. The body was found Thursday on a lawn on Brightwood Avenue. Officers went door to door and interviewed a woman nearby, Deputy Mark Bailey said. Homicide detectives questioned the woman and took her to a hospital.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
An Arcadia woman delivered a stillborn baby girl Tuesday, dashing her hopes that the infant's vital organs could be used for transplantion. The parents, Brenda and Michael Winner, had known their child would be born with most of her brain missing and had touched off a controversy by expressing a desire to have the child kept alive artificially so that its major organs could be donated. "We are all very sad to have to report to you some very sad news," Dr.
HEALTH
April 14, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
At least 2.6 million fetuses die worldwide after the 28th week of pregnancy every year, a number that has declined only modestly in recent years, researchers said Wednesday. Fully half of those stillbirths occur during delivery, in large part because women do not receive adequate medical care during the event, according to the first comprehensive study of the problem, reported in six papers and eight commentaries in the journal Lancet. The number of stillbirths could be reduced by 45% by 2015 in the most affected countries at a cost of only $2.32 per person by such simple expedients as improving obstetric care; treating syphilis infections and hypertension in pregnant women; and identifying and treating medical conditions that block fetal growth, experts said.
SCIENCE
April 21, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Infections by a recently discovered virus may be responsible for a significant fraction of stillbirths, Swedish and American researchers reported Thursday in the journal Birth Defects Research. The Ljungan virus is named after the Swedish river valley where virologist Bo Niklasson of Uppsala University discovered it in voles in 1999. The virus is apparently also common in American rodents, said his coauthor, geneticist William Klitz of the Public Health Institute in Oakland.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An abortion clinic surrendered its license Wednesday amid allegations that a woman delivered a nearly full-term stillborn baby after a staff member gave her an abortion-inducing drug without a doctor present. Summit Medical Center in Birmingham has been closed since the Alabama Department of Public Health suspended its operations May 17, citing numerous violations of health rules, said Rick Harris, director of the state agency's Bureau of Health Provider Standards.
HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
More women with fertility problems are becoming pregnant than ever before and more premature babies are living longer. But those advances in the field of obstetrics are in stark contrast to a less publicized problem: The number of stillbirths remains stubbornly high. Each year, more than 26,000 American women experience a stillbirth -- amounting to about 1 in 200 pregnancies. That number is equal to the cause of all infant deaths combined, federal health officials say.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A growing body of research from around the world indicates that smog is exacting a much greater toll than previously known on infants and unborn babies. Scientists have long known that the extreme levels of air pollution found in the developing world can harm babies, and that lesser pollution in U.S. cities can sicken or kill the elderly and infirm. The new research shows that the harmful effects of dirty air can extend even into the womb.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | STEVE BAILEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scientists are trying to figure out why pregnant Kentucky mares are losing foals at a staggering rate this spring in a mystery that has sent fear through the state's $1.2-billion thoroughbred horse industry. "It's got a lot of people spooked, no doubt about it," said Steve Johnson, president of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club. "I've talked to a lot of farm owners who aren't going to sleep very much until they find out what is going on with their mares."
HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
More women with fertility problems are becoming pregnant than ever before and more premature babies are living longer. But those advances in the field of obstetrics are in stark contrast to a less publicized problem: The number of stillbirths remains stubbornly high. Each year, more than 26,000 American women experience a stillbirth -- amounting to about 1 in 200 pregnancies. That number is equal to the cause of all infant deaths combined, federal health officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The infant and fetal death rate among Latinos in Los Angeles County is rising dramatically--a trend that health officials trace in part to the acculturation of Latin American immigrants and their adoption of unhealthy U.S. habits. The Latino infant mortality rate--the rate at which babies die before age 1--has risen by more than a third since 1987, according to county health statistics released Thursday. The rate of stillbirths among Latinos during the same period rose by 45%.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | HEIDI RUSSELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Heather Heisey remembers her newborn son clutching her husband's finger as the infant struggled to breathe before he died, just 20 minutes after birth. She knew six months into her pregnancy that he had a rare and lethal genetic defect preventing his lungs from developing fully--and that he would die almost as soon as he was born in February 1997. The Heiseys named him David and buried him near their home in Louisville, Ky. Since then, the couple, who moved to Elizabethtown, Pa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996
An autopsy Friday revealed that a newborn boy found in Monterey Park was a natural stillbirth, and officials said the mentally disabled woman who gave birth to him will not be prosecuted. The body was found Thursday on a lawn on Brightwood Avenue. Officers went door to door and interviewed a woman nearby, Deputy Mark Bailey said. Homicide detectives questioned the woman and took her to a hospital.
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