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Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge

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NEWS
October 28, 1988
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
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NEWS
December 5, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miles of sand and a few ponds are all that remain of Nevada's biggest wetland marsh, a key stopover for migrating birds in the West. As Ron Anglin nudges his Jeep over the unnatural desert, white flashes are glimpsed through the brush--Alaskan tundra swans. "The first year I was here there were 15,000 swans," said Anglin, manager of Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. "This year we might get 3,000."
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NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report issued Thursday by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
NEWS
October 28, 1988
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miles of sand and a few ponds are all that remain of Nevada's biggest wetland marsh, a key stopover for migrating birds in the West. As Ron Anglin nudges his Jeep over the unnatural desert, white flashes are glimpsed through the brush--Alaskan tundra swans. "The first year I was here there were 15,000 swans," said Anglin, manager of Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. "This year we might get 3,000."
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Park Ranger Randy Moore went fishing late one evening in the remote desert reservoir that he oversees. When he came to work the next day, the lake and its world-class fishery were gone, victims of the severe drought gripping northern Nevada. Below Rye Patch Dam, the riverbed was choked with 1.5 million dead fish--stranded when farmers who own the water emptied the reservoir overnight for their alfalfa fields downstream.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, young Levi Stotts loved to ride his bike in the dusty mounds of 19th-Century mine tailings across the street from his house. But his fun ended a year ago when toxic cleanup workers in white Tyvex suits arrived in this historic mining town, scooped up the hillocks and hauled them away. The waste, left from the legendary Comstock Lode mines where Mark Twain first made his name, was contaminated with levels of mercury 26 times higher than the federal safety standard.
MAGAZINE
May 28, 1989 | J. E. FERRELL, J. E. Ferrell is a free-lance science writer who lives in Davis.
ON MARCH 20, 1987, an agitated laboratory technician slapped a newspaper into the hands of Bill Frankenberger, 34-year-old associate professor of soil microbiology and biochemistry at UC Riverside. Frankenberger slumped into a chair, put on his glasses and began to read. Suddenly, he jolted upright, excited . . . devastated. According to the article, the state of California had decided how to solve an ecological disaster at Kesterson Reservoir in the Central Valley. Toxic levels of selenium there had killed hundreds of birds and contaminated countless others.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report issued Thursday by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
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