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Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

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NEWS
July 23, 1988 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Agricultural drain water from large-scale farming near Fallon, Nev., is so toxic that it kills both freshwater fish and invertebrates commonly found in the nearby Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, a preliminary U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study has found. The finding was widely viewed Friday as an early signal that the ecological health of the 164,000-acre wildlife refuge 60 miles east of Reno could be in jeopardy.
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NEWS
October 28, 1988
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
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NEWS
October 28, 1988
Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos, Calif., and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in northern Nevada are the national wildlife refuges most threatened by pollution, according to a report by the Wilderness Society, a conservation organization.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Agricultural drain water from large-scale farming near Fallon, Nev., is so toxic that it kills both freshwater fish and invertebrates commonly found in the nearby Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, a preliminary U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study has found. The finding was widely viewed Friday as an early signal that the ecological health of the 164,000-acre wildlife refuge 60 miles east of Reno could be in jeopardy.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A sudden growth of algae fed by farmland runoff is tentatively being blamed for the latest fish kill at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area east of here. About 10,000 carp, catfish and Sacramento black fish have died over the last week at Lead Lake, near the Carson Sink, where 7 million tui chub died earlier this year.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Ten thousand fish have died in the last week at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, not far from where an estimated 7 million small fish died earlier in the year, officials said. Refuge manager Ron Anglin said he had no explanation for the deaths at Lead Lake of carp, Sacramento black fish and catfish. Anglin said the earlier die-off was a result of water that became increasingly brackish as it evaporated after a dry winter.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | Associated Press
About six months after a huge fish die-off at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, scientists say its centuries as a refuge may be nearing an end. The 164,000-acre refuge is evaporating faster than the limited flow of water into it can keep pace. And as the water carries agricultural runoff into the area, the toxic salts increase as the level of the marsh drops. About 7 million fish died at the reserve in February as the water receded and its salinity increased.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | MARTIN GRIFFITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
One of Nevada's most important wildlife habitats has become the latest victim of the lingering drought. Jeff Mackay, a wildlife biologist for the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, said the Ruby marshes in northeastern Nevada have dwindled from 12,000 acres to 2,900 acres, their lowest level in 31 years. The marshes, flanked against the majestic Ruby Mountains about 40 miles southeast of Elko, virtually dried up after similar droughts in 1961 and in the 1930s.
NEWS
February 14, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
An estimated 3 million fish and 1,500 migratory birds have died at the Stillwater National Wildlife Management Area near here in an environmental mystery that has baffled and alarmed biologists. Dead fish--tui chub, eight- to 10-inch-long scavengers--line the 30-mile shoreline of the Carson Sink, a vast body of water that is a natural terminus for the Carson and Humboldt rivers in west-central Nevada. "There were several fish along the shoreline that had small fish hanging out of their mouths.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Biologists have tentatively blamed the deaths of an estimated 7 million fish at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area in northern Nevada on high salt levels in the nature refuge's waters, a Nevada Wildlife Department spokesman said Thursday. "I don't think that there's any doubt that they're (the fish) dying because of salinity levels," said spokesman David Rice, who added that unless the situation is reversed, the wildlife refuge faces "doom."
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miles of sand and a few ponds are all that remain of Nevada's biggest wetland marsh, a key stopover for migrating birds in the West. As Ron Anglin nudges his Jeep over the unnatural desert, white flashes are glimpsed through the brush--Alaskan tundra swans. "The first year I was here there were 15,000 swans," said Anglin, manager of Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. "This year we might get 3,000."
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
In mid-state New York, a muddy creek meanders through a hazardous dump on its way to a national wildlife refuge, where it provides the main source of water for eagles, herons and migratory birds. In Texas' lower Rio Grande Valley, pesticides sprayed on farmlands from the air drift over a refuge for birds. In 1983, several Franklin's gulls were found dead on the refuge. They had eaten cicadas coated with pesticide.
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