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Stimulant

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SCIENCE
July 1, 2002 | FromTimes staff and wire reports
Caffeine, a common stimulant, can kill slugs and snails and can discourage slugs from munching on treated plants, suggesting a possible approach to environmentally friendly pest control for gardens and cropland, Hawaiian researchers reported in the June 27 issue of Nature. A team at the U.S. Department of Agriculture research center in Hilo found, for example, that when they let slugs bury themselves in potted soil and then applied a 2% caffeine solution to the dirt, 92% died within two days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown, citing his meetings with law enforcement officials across the state, said Tuesday that "realignment is working. " Brown, speaking to reporters after he addressed the annual Crime Victims' Rights rally at the Capitol, called the realignment program, in which low-level felons are kept in county jails rather than sent to prisons, "encouraging and stimulating. " "I've talked to district attorneys, I've talked to police chiefs, I've talked to sheriffs," Brown said.
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SPORTS
March 1, 1985 | Associated Press
Traces of a stimulant were found in the urine of champion Livingstone Bramble following his Feb. 16 World Boxing Assn. lightweight title fight with Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini in Reno, state boxing officials said Thursday. Harold Buck, director of the Nevada Athletic Commission, called the finding a "very serious" violation of rules against drug use by fighters and said the commission would meet next month to consider sanctions against Bramble.
SCIENCE
April 8, 2014 | Melissa Healy
With the help of electrodes placed near the spine, patients who had been paralyzed for more than two years were able to regain some voluntary control over their legs, according to a study released Tuesday. The electrodes stimulated the spinal cords of the patients while they engaged in specific motor tasks involving their paralyzed limbs. Before the patients were injured and their spinal cords were damaged, their brains would have sent those key electrical signals to their legs. The new study upends the assumption that two years post-accident is a point of no return for people paralyzed due to a spinal cord injury.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Problems with stimulant medications used to treat symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are sending an increasing number of Americans to emergency departments for treatment, a new government report warns. Between 2005 and 2010, a study finds, ADHD medication-related emergency room visits have more than doubled - from 13,379 in 2005 to 31,244 in 2010. While emergencies associated with ADHD medications rose slightly among children, the hike has been particularly pronounced in those over 18. The new data were reported Thursday in an issue of the DAWN (Drug Abuse Warning Network)
SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
By the end of high school, 12% of teens say they have taken a stimulant medication for reasons other than to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But parents, including many of those whose kids are taking ADHD drugs in a bid to boost their academic performance, appear to be clueless. Among parents whose kids have not been prescribed ADHD medication, a University of Michigan study found, only 1% said they believed their child had used prescription stimulant medication -- including Ritalin, Adderall and Vyvanse -- as a study drug.
SPORTS
November 28, 1989
Marathoner Jeff Scuffins, quarter-miler Willie Caldwell and shotputter Tom Huminik were suspended Monday by The Athletics Congress for drug use. Caldwell, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Huminik, who attends North Carolina State, each were given two-year suspensions, while Scuffins, of Hagerstown, Md., was suspended for three months. The suspensions were effective immediately.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poison gas may not have been the only thing Aum Supreme Truth allegedly brewed in its laboratories, Japanese police say: Officials reportedly plan to pursue charges against the cult for transforming its Mt. Fuji compound into a methamphetamine production center and selling the stimulant to this nation's largest organized crime group for distribution in western Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1988
When I read The Times article (Part 1, July 28) pertaining to Air Force pilots' use of stimulants to combat fatigue, it brought to mind a what's-new-under-the-sun experience I had almost a half century ago while serving as a cryptographer with the 610th Signal Operations Battalion during World War II. When our outfit moved into a German Luftwaffe quarters near Braunschweig, Germany, we discovered a room filled with boxes of chocolates that had...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Torrance gynecologist faces a disciplinary hearing because he allegedly used a sexually stimulating massage to treat a woman's ovarian cysts. An accusation filed by the state attorney general's office against Hector H. Arnazzi, 40, charges the doctor with gross negligence for using "a method which more closely resembled simulated sexual intercourse than any type of ovarian massage." John Rhode, an attorney for Arnazzi, said his client "flatly denies" any sexual misconduct.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Migraine disorder is an elephant in the room of medicine, says Dr. Andrew Charles, professor of neurology and director of the Headache Research and Treatment Program at UCLA. "All physicians - anybody in any kind of medical practice - knows how common headache and migraine are as a presenting complaint, and yet we don't really talk about it that much," he explains. Though migraine disorder affects 36 million Americans each year and is listed by the World Health Organization as the third most common disorder on the planet, it isn't well represented in medical school curricula.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
In the morning while walking to her car, Michelle Kennedy sometimes detects a smell like cat urine. The asthma her 6-year-old suffers seems to have worsened. Kennedy blames the oil and gas wells pumping in and near her South Los Angeles neighborhood. She was especially troubled to hear that acid was being injected in some shafts roughly a mile from her home. Now Los Angeles could put a stop to several practices that Kennedy and her neighbors have lobbied against, at least inside its city limits.
HEALTH
January 31, 2014 | By David Levine
The numbers are staggering: Almost 7% of the U.S. adult population - about 17.6 million people - is diagnosed with depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that depression costs 200 million lost workdays each year at a cost to employers of $17 billion to $44 billion. There are effective treatments for depression, including, researchers said recently, meditation. But neither talk therapy nor the existing medications work for everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By James Rainey
Promoting its campaign to bring higher wages to Los Angeles workers, the county labor federation released a study Tuesday that says 810,864 Angelenos live with "poverty" wages of less than $15 an hour. Maria Elena Durazo, chief of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, said that a raise to $15 would not only help low-wage workers but also provide a massive economic stimulus for the entire regional economy. As it released the report from the Economic Roundtable at a news conference near MacArthur Park, the labor group also unveiled billboards, styled after green "city limits" signs, that read: "Los Angeles, City Limited, Poverty Wage Pop. 810,864.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Critics of Lawrence H. Summers, one of the leading candidates to be the next Federal Reserve chairman, point to his reputation for being difficult to work with.  But a former Obama administration economic aide who worked for Summers at the White House said he enjoyed the experience. Steven Rattner, a former investment banker who headed President Obama's auto task force in 2009, said in a New York Times opinion article Monday that although he had known Summers for years, he wasn't sure what it would be like to work with him. "Larry's vivid and sometimes strong personality has been well chronicled.
SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
By the end of high school, 12% of teens say they have taken a stimulant medication for reasons other than to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But parents, including many of those whose kids are taking ADHD drugs in a bid to boost their academic performance, appear to be clueless. Among parents whose kids have not been prescribed ADHD medication, a University of Michigan study found, only 1% said they believed their child had used prescription stimulant medication -- including Ritalin, Adderall and Vyvanse -- as a study drug.
OPINION
January 21, 2009
As lawmakers debate a bill to invigorate the ailing economy, conservatives and liberals have split into (predictable) camps over its contents. The former want to tilt the $825-billion package toward more tax relief, particularly for employers. The latter want more government spending, arguing that it's the most efficient way to promote growth. It has become something of a religious debate, with both sides clinging tightly to beliefs that they can't actually prove.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The presence of caffeine in gum, jelly beans, waffles and other foods has prompted the Food and Drug Administration to investigate the stimulant's potential effects on children and adolescents. The FDA's announcement comes a few weeks after gum maker Wrigley introduced its Alert Energy Caffeine Gum. Each piece of the gum contains about as much caffeine as a half-cup of coffee, according to a consumer update that the FDA posted on its website Friday. The update provided more information on an investigation the FDA announced earlier this week.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2013 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Ancient plant and animal matter trapped within Arctic permafrost can be converted rapidly into climate-warming carbon dioxide when melted and exposed to sunlight, according to a new study. In a report published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , a team of environmental and biological scientists examined 27 melting permafrost sites in Alaska and found that bacteria converted dissolved organic carbon materials into the greenhouse gas CO2 40% faster when exposed to ultraviolet light.
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