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Sting Operations

NEWS
December 6, 1992 | from Reuters
U.S. and state law enforcement officials Saturday arrested six big-game guides and outfitters charged with illegally taking wildlife, including protected grizzly bears and wolves, in one of Alaska's largest sting operations ever. The arrests came amid national outrage over a plan by Alaska's game managers to use airborne hunters to shoot hundreds of wolves for the purpose of boosting caribou and moose populations in certain areas. The U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who had been under surveillance for about a month was arrested when he tried to purchase a kilogram of cocaine from an undercover officer on a downtown street, authorities said Thursday. William Barr, 25, a 4 1/2-year veteran of the department, was arrested about 2:15 p.m. Wednesday near Alameda and Macy streets, said Deputy Larry Mead, a Sheriff's Department spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no training manual for rookie cops sent back to high school as undercover narcs. But the really important rules can be learned more quickly than algebra. * Whenever possible, address authority figures as "dude." * Speak frequently about the band Rancid and how incredibly hard they rock.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prospective juror gazing out of this town's only federal courtroom might have seen, framed in a single fanlight window, the snapshot symbolism of what the Earth First! environmental movement has been about: a live oak tree and an electric pole, almost side by side. Ten years and barely 170 miles from where Earth First! announced its arrival in 1981, unfurling a 100-yard black plastic streamer down the face of Glen Canyon Dam to look like a deep crack, four Earth First!
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Most of the drug users arrested by Santa Ana police officers dealing county-made crack cocaine are not sent to jail even though the controversial stings are intended to make small-time buyers eligible for harsher punishments, authorities said Friday. Deputy Dist. Atty. Carl Armbrust acknowledged that a majority of the 350 people arrested during the past 18 months were first-time buyers and were assigned to drug diversion programs instead of receiving jail or prison terms.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a case involving police use of decoys aimed at arresting homosexuals, the California Supreme Court on Monday made it easier to prove discriminatory prosecution. The unanimous ruling will allow gays to challenge arrests in which police use decoys to go after homosexual targets, but do not arrest heterosexuals for similar activities, lawyers in the case said. "This will sound the death knell of cop sting operations everywhere that are focused on gays," said Bruce W.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An undercover operation in which Santa Ana police manufactured and sold rock cocaine in order to snare prospective drug buyers was upheld Friday by an appellate court panel. The decision, hailed by prosecutors and police but criticized by public defenders, overturned an earlier ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge David O. Carter, who called the program "outrageous" and essentially forced police to end it two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1993 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police in Brea and Anaheim have made a series of arrests in separate prostitution "sting" operations at local motels, authorities said Wednesday. On Tuesday night, Brea police conducted a sting at the Hyland Motel, 700 S.Brea Blvd., and arrested a 22-year-old Huntington Beach woman on suspicion of prostitution. Police began an undercover operation with the cooperation of motel management after receiving a tip that acts of prostitution were taking place at the motel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1996 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI
Officials charged 18 unlicensed contractors Friday with ripping off San Fernando Valley homeowners by accepting money for repairs of damage caused by the Northridge quake then abandoning the projects. The charges grew out of investigations by the Contractors State Licensing Board, which sometimes conducted sting operations with agents posing as homeowners, Deputy City Atty Don Cocek said.
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