Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStinger Missile
IN THE NEWS

Stinger Missile

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan will not return Stinger missile launchers supplied by the United States to anti-Soviet rebels during the Afghan war, Afghanistan's prime minister said Thursday. Washington wants to buy back the antiaircraft weapons to keep them from falling into the hands of terrorists. "The Afghan government does not intend to allow even a round of ammunition to be taken out of Afghanistan," Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar told reporters in the Iranian capital, Tehran.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 6, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Reagan administration made a controversial decision to send shoulder-fired missiles to Afghan rebels in 1986, critics warned the move could come back to haunt the United States. In the hands of an anti-American guerrilla, then-Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) cautioned, a Stinger missile could instantly turn a U.S. aircraft "into a bright orange inferno." Soon, that warning may seem prescient. Taliban forces in Afghanistan still have about 100 U.S.-supplied Stingers, according to U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Irish national charged with trying to buy a Stinger missile in West Palm Beach, Fla., had told undercover police that his Irish Republican Army cell was involved in an attempt to kill British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in 1984, prosecution papers filed in court say. The documents quote the defendant, Kevin Joseph McKinley, as implicating the IRA in the bombing at a Brighton, England, hotel in which five people died. Thatcher escaped injury in the blast.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Army can't account for 40 Stinger missiles, one of three types that are vulnerable to theft because of lax security and record-keeping, a congressional report said Tuesday. The Pentagon insists that none are missing and says the problem is all in the bookkeeping. Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio), who released the General Accounting Office report, says it raises questions about U.S. ability to keep sophisticated weapons out of the hands of terrorists.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four people believed to be members of the Irish Republican Army were arrested Friday while attempting to purchase a heat-seeking anti-aircraft missile and other weapons, the FBI announced. The four, believed to be members of the Provisional faction of the IRA, were trying to gather weapons for terrorist activities outside the United States, said William Gavin, who heads the FBI office in South Florida.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | From Reuters
Four persons suspected of being on a weapons-shopping expedition to Florida for the Irish Republican Army were denied bail after a hearing Friday. The four were arrested on Jan. 12 after allegedly taking delivery of a powerful ground-to-air Stinger missile that they told undercover agents was for use against British military helicopters. Federal Magistrate Ann Vitunac ordered the four held without bail. Arraignment was set for next Friday.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI announced the arrest Monday of two Colombians, including one linked to Medellin cartel boss Pablo Escobar, on charges of conspiring to purchase stolen U.S. Stinger missiles to shoot down Colombian government helicopters being used in the drug war. The two allegedly offered to pay more than $1 million for the shoulder-fired weapons, which have proved highly effective in guerrilla conflicts overseas.
NEWS
October 6, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Reagan administration made a controversial decision to send shoulder-fired missiles to Afghan rebels in 1986, critics warned the move could come back to haunt the United States. In the hands of an anti-American guerrilla, then-Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) cautioned, a Stinger missile could instantly turn a U.S. aircraft "into a bright orange inferno." Soon, that warning may seem prescient. Taliban forces in Afghanistan still have about 100 U.S.-supplied Stingers, according to U.S.
NEWS
November 19, 1987
In an effort to stem widespread use of shoulder-launched Stinger anti-aircraft missiles, the House voted 322-93 to limit sales of the weapons to North Atlantic Treaty Organization members and other major U.S. allies. The amendment to the 1988-89 foreign aid authorization bill also would ban sales of the missiles to any nation in the Persian Gulf region. The move was prompted by fears that the weapons would fall into the hands of terrorists who could use them against U.S. targets.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan will not return Stinger missile launchers supplied by the United States to anti-Soviet rebels during the Afghan war, Afghanistan's prime minister said Thursday. Washington wants to buy back the antiaircraft weapons to keep them from falling into the hands of terrorists. "The Afghan government does not intend to allow even a round of ammunition to be taken out of Afghanistan," Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar told reporters in the Iranian capital, Tehran.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1993 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teledyne has agreed to pay $10 million to settle federal civil claims that its electronics division in Newbury Park falsified tests on aircraft identification systems for U.S. Army Stinger missiles, the government said Wednesday. Los Angeles-based Teledyne will pay a $5-million fine and spend at least $5 million more to recall, screen and repair 5,900 electronic missile parts tested from 1983 to 1988, according to the U.S. Justice Department.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Partly in response to growing fears of terrorist attacks on American civilian aircraft, the CIA this month requested $55 million to buy back hundreds of the highly efficient Stinger antiaircraft missiles that the United States gave to Afghan rebels in the 1980s, according to informed U.S. sources.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI announced the arrest Monday of two Colombians, including one linked to Medellin cartel boss Pablo Escobar, on charges of conspiring to purchase stolen U.S. Stinger missiles to shoot down Colombian government helicopters being used in the drug war. The two allegedly offered to pay more than $1 million for the shoulder-fired weapons, which have proved highly effective in guerrilla conflicts overseas.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | From Reuters
Four persons suspected of being on a weapons-shopping expedition to Florida for the Irish Republican Army were denied bail after a hearing Friday. The four were arrested on Jan. 12 after allegedly taking delivery of a powerful ground-to-air Stinger missile that they told undercover agents was for use against British military helicopters. Federal Magistrate Ann Vitunac ordered the four held without bail. Arraignment was set for next Friday.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Irish national charged with trying to buy a Stinger missile in West Palm Beach, Fla., had told undercover police that his Irish Republican Army cell was involved in an attempt to kill British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in 1984, prosecution papers filed in court say. The documents quote the defendant, Kevin Joseph McKinley, as implicating the IRA in the bombing at a Brighton, England, hotel in which five people died. Thatcher escaped injury in the blast.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Iran may have obtained a small number of American-made Stinger anti-aircraft missiles by taking them away from a U.S.-backed group of Afghan guerrillas earlier this year, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said in an interview Wednesday. Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards might have seized some of the shoulder-fired missiles after a truck convoy broke down near the Iran-Afghanistan border, Weinberger told the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH and MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. weapons that many believe turned the tide against Soviet forces in Afghanistan--Stinger anti-aircraft missiles--are now causing "serious concern" that they will fall into the hands of Iranian or other terrorists when the Afghan war ends, senior U.S. officials said last week.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four people believed to be members of the Irish Republican Army were arrested Friday while attempting to purchase a heat-seeking anti-aircraft missile and other weapons, the FBI announced. The four, believed to be members of the Provisional faction of the IRA, were trying to gather weapons for terrorist activities outside the United States, said William Gavin, who heads the FBI office in South Florida.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A militant Muslim group has acquired two U.S.-made Stinger surface-to-air missiles, the Lebanese magazine As Shiraa magazine said Friday. The weekly magazine quoted an unidentified source close to the group, which it did not name, as saying the shoulder-held missiles "have reached Lebanon through an embassy that provided part of the large sum paid." The magazine did not identify the embassy. It also did not specify whether the fundamentalists were Shiite or Sunni Muslim.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|