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Stipe Mesic

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WORLD
January 17, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Croatian President Stipe Mesic comfortably won a second term in an election runoff and pledged to step up efforts to lead his former Yugoslav republic to European Union membership. The 70-year-old won 66% of the vote; Deputy Prime Minister Jadranka Kosor, whose party controls parliament, trailed with 34%. Mesic will serve until 2009, when Croatia hopes to join the EU.
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WORLD
January 17, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Croatian President Stipe Mesic comfortably won a second term in an election runoff and pledged to step up efforts to lead his former Yugoslav republic to European Union membership. The 70-year-old won 66% of the vote; Deputy Prime Minister Jadranka Kosor, whose party controls parliament, trailed with 34%. Mesic will serve until 2009, when Croatia hopes to join the EU.
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NEWS
February 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Populist politician Stipe Mesic won Croatia's presidential election and immediately pledged to overturn the nationalist policies of previous head of state Franjo Tudjman. The country's electoral commission said early today that Mesic had won 56.21% of the vote in the second-round runoff ballot, compared with 43.79% for Social Liberal party leader Drazen Budisa.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tommy Lapid, an Israeli legislator and Holocaust survivor, had to think twice about whether to attend Wednesday's special parliamentary session in honor of Croatia's president, Stipe Mesic. Haunted by his own family's ordeal, the Yugoslav-born Lapid also recalled the tens of thousands of Jews killed in the Balkans in World War II, when a Nazi puppet regime ruled Croatia and ran the Jasenovac extermination camp.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Declaring his job irrelevant because Yugoslavia no longer exists, Croatia's Stipe Mesic resigned Thursday as president of the disintegrating Balkan federation. The gesture was mostly symbolic, since Mesic exercised little influence in the collective presidency, which has been paralyzed by the same political, ethnic and religious strains that have broken up Yugoslavia and plunged its people into a deadly war.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As church bells chimed and an enthusiastic crowd cheered, Croatia's new democratically elected president was sworn in Friday in a brief but emotional ceremony that marked a rare success story in the troubled Balkans. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright joined presidents, prime ministers, diplomats and dignitaries from nearly 50 nations to applaud President Stipe Mesic's inauguration.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslavia founders in the turbulent seas of ethnic unrest, it would seem to make little difference which republic is at the helm when the ship of state goes under. But this week's transfer of the federal presidency from Serbia to rival Croatia has traumatized Serbian militants and raised fears that further violence may be instigated to prevent an orderly rotation.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav leadership collapsed Friday after what amounted to a Serbian-led coup d'etat , leaving the crisis-torn country without a president or a forum to negotiate escape from a looming civil war. The power vacuum left open the possibility of a military takeover, moves by Croatia and Slovenia to secede, and uncontrollable outbreaks of violence between armed Serbs and Croats.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tommy Lapid, an Israeli legislator and Holocaust survivor, had to think twice about whether to attend Wednesday's special parliamentary session in honor of Croatia's president, Stipe Mesic. Haunted by his own family's ordeal, the Yugoslav-born Lapid also recalled the tens of thousands of Jews killed in the Balkans in World War II, when a Nazi puppet regime ruled Croatia and ran the Jasenovac extermination camp.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As church bells chimed and an enthusiastic crowd cheered, Croatia's new democratically elected president was sworn in Friday in a brief but emotional ceremony that marked a rare success story in the troubled Balkans. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright joined presidents, prime ministers, diplomats and dignitaries from nearly 50 nations to applaud President Stipe Mesic's inauguration.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Populist politician Stipe Mesic won Croatia's presidential election and immediately pledged to overturn the nationalist policies of previous head of state Franjo Tudjman. The country's electoral commission said early today that Mesic had won 56.21% of the vote in the second-round runoff ballot, compared with 43.79% for Social Liberal party leader Drazen Budisa.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Declaring his job irrelevant because Yugoslavia no longer exists, Croatia's Stipe Mesic resigned Thursday as president of the disintegrating Balkan federation. The gesture was mostly symbolic, since Mesic exercised little influence in the collective presidency, which has been paralyzed by the same political, ethnic and religious strains that have broken up Yugoslavia and plunged its people into a deadly war.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav leadership collapsed Friday after what amounted to a Serbian-led coup d'etat , leaving the crisis-torn country without a president or a forum to negotiate escape from a looming civil war. The power vacuum left open the possibility of a military takeover, moves by Croatia and Slovenia to secede, and uncontrollable outbreaks of violence between armed Serbs and Croats.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslavia founders in the turbulent seas of ethnic unrest, it would seem to make little difference which republic is at the helm when the ship of state goes under. But this week's transfer of the federal presidency from Serbia to rival Croatia has traumatized Serbian militants and raised fears that further violence may be instigated to prevent an orderly rotation.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | Associated Press
Slovenia President Milan Kucan: MEE-lan KOO-chan Parliament President France Bucar: FRAHN-tsay BOO-char Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel: Di-MEE-tree ROO-pell Capital, Ljubljana: LYUHB-lee-ah-nah Croatia President Franjo Tudjman: FRAHN-yo TOODGE-mahn Federal Government President Stipe Mesic: STEE-pay MEH-sich Prime Minister Ante Markovic: AN-tay MAR-kaw-vich Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic: VEL-ykoh kah-DEE-yeh-vich
WORLD
October 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Croatia's president, testifying at Slobodan Milosevic's genocide trial, said the former Yugoslav leader was a warmonger responsible for Yugoslavia's demise. Milosevic "could have desisted from the option of war, but he never took any action to stop it," Stipe Mesic said.
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