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Stock Exchanges South America

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June 19, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks across Latin America and in Spain plunged Monday after Argentina stunned the financial community with a new policy on exchange rates that some analysts saw as a de facto devaluation. The policy changes, announced over the weekend, obliterated much of the confidence earned when Argentina exchanged $29 billion in debt this month, a move that seemed to give the country some breathing room from worried creditors.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks across Latin America and in Spain plunged Monday after Argentina stunned the financial community with a new policy on exchange rates that some analysts saw as a de facto devaluation. The policy changes, announced over the weekend, obliterated much of the confidence earned when Argentina exchanged $29 billion in debt this month, a move that seemed to give the country some breathing room from worried creditors.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | BRIAN WINTER, REUTERS
The ugly specter of a debt default by Argentina returned with a vengeance Friday, as rumors of an imminent economic meltdown led panicked stock and bond traders to exit Latin American markets en masse. Argentina's Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo attacked the swirling rumors of default as "irresponsible," but traders still appeared to be betting that the nation's troubled economy would soon collapse under the government's $128-billion debt load.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | BRIAN WINTER, REUTERS
The ugly specter of a debt default by Argentina returned with a vengeance Friday, as rumors of an imminent economic meltdown led panicked stock and bond traders to exit Latin American markets en masse. Argentina's Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo attacked the swirling rumors of default as "irresponsible," but traders still appeared to be betting that the nation's troubled economy would soon collapse under the government's $128-billion debt load.
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