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BUSINESS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan avoided a near-death experience Friday when its stock market reversed course and advanced 2.7% after a drop to dangerously low levels Thursday. In a bid to keep shares headed north, the government announced a package of stock-boosting measures and an interest rate cut. The Friday rise might prove a short-lived relief to investors. Japan has no lock on jittery markets these days, but the stakes here in the world's second-largest economy are arguably higher.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan avoided a near-death experience Friday when its stock market reversed course and advanced 2.7% after a drop to dangerously low levels Thursday. In a bid to keep shares headed north, the government announced a package of stock-boosting measures and an interest rate cut. The Friday rise might prove a short-lived relief to investors. Japan has no lock on jittery markets these days, but the stakes here in the world's second-largest economy are arguably higher.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of Hong Kong's new second-tier stock market looks impressive. It caters to small, smart high-tech companies looking for cash in a city busy reinventing itself as Asia's Silicon Valley. Hong Kong's treasure chest of investment capital and business savvy also seems a ready-made resource for a Chinese mainland economy rich in new ideas but short on money to develop them.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of Hong Kong's new second-tier stock market looks impressive. It caters to small, smart high-tech companies looking for cash in a city busy reinventing itself as Asia's Silicon Valley. Hong Kong's treasure chest of investment capital and business savvy also seems a ready-made resource for a Chinese mainland economy rich in new ideas but short on money to develop them.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in India's bustling financial capital--where new stocks are advertised on billboards and buses, and the latest securities applications are sold from parked cars and street kiosks--Harshad Mehta had no equal. The brash young broker lived like a modern maharajah, with 29 cars and a 7,000-square-foot white-marble apartment overlooking the Arabian Sea. His pudgy, boyish face grinned from magazine covers and TV sets.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | From Washington Post
The surging U.S. economy is likely to push the federal budget surplus to at least $50 billion for the current fiscal year, according to an internal Federal Reserve projection. And other estimates show that the total could soar to $75 billion or more if current spending and revenue trends continue.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Markets across Asia suffered a serious case of the jitters early today, as traders moved to protect themselves from continued turmoil in Asian currency and equity markets. At midday today, Hong Kong's Hang Seng index was off 586.87 points, or 5.3%, at 10,557.47, Tokyo's Nikkei-225 index was down 333.47 points, or 1.9%, at 17,030.27 and Sydney's key index was off 84 points, or 3.3%, at 2,477.3.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Hu Yiming's three-month internship at the Pacific Stock Exchange here was intended to promote cooperation and friendship between the sister cities of Shanghai and San Francisco. That it appears to be doing. But besides symbolizing harmony, Hu's visit has also managed to highlight the burgeoning international competition between the scrappy little Pacific exchange and its huge East Coast rival, the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Prices paid to U.S. producers fell in the first quarter at the fastest pace in almost five years, the government said Thursday, and retailers reported brisk sales in March, signs that inflation is still in check as growth remains strong. The producer price index dropped 0.3% in March, the fifth consecutive monthly decline, Labor Department figures showed. During the first quarter, the PPI fell at a 4.2% annual rate. That's the biggest quarterly drop since the three months ending in August 1993.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Dai Yunping has never traveled very far from his home here. But next month, the baby-faced 27-year-old will indulge in a weeklong tour of Southeast Asia to the tune of $6,500. Upon his return, Dai plans to move out of his parents' home and buy his own apartment in the old French Concession area. Where's the money coming from? Not from his family, nor his $650-a-month job at a trading company.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a runner who refuses to slow the pace in a grueling marathon, the U.S. economy has streaked into 1999 swifter and more powerful than most experts ever expected, undermining prospects for lower interest rates and prompting analysts to toss out forecasts that had called for a sharp decline in growth. New reports on factories, retail spending and unemployment claims Thursday provided the latest pieces in a picture of striking economic vitality.
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