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BUSINESS
January 12, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Brazilian markets reeled as the federal government cut off aid to a state that suspended debt payments, threatening the same retaliation against other regions seeking to renegotiate billions of dollars of obligations to Brasilia. The escalating conflict among Brazil's cash-strapped governments makes it tougher for the federal government to narrow its projected $64-billion deficit and reduce interest rates that topped 32%.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Brazilian markets reeled as the federal government cut off aid to a state that suspended debt payments, threatening the same retaliation against other regions seeking to renegotiate billions of dollars of obligations to Brasilia. The escalating conflict among Brazil's cash-strapped governments makes it tougher for the federal government to narrow its projected $64-billion deficit and reduce interest rates that topped 32%.
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NEWS
September 15, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World economic leaders are nearing a consensus that Latin America, especially Brazil, must be saved from an Asian-style economic collapse. That consensus crystallized Monday as the world community, led by President Clinton, made the survival of emerging markets a priority. The major industrialized nations seem ready to draw a line in the sand with Brazil out of fear that the collapse of Latin America's largest economy would be an enormous setback in the global shift toward free-market economies.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World economic leaders are nearing a consensus that Latin America, especially Brazil, must be saved from an Asian-style economic collapse. That consensus crystallized Monday as the world community, led by President Clinton, made the survival of emerging markets a priority. The major industrialized nations seem ready to draw a line in the sand with Brazil out of fear that the collapse of Latin America's largest economy would be an enormous setback in the global shift toward free-market economies.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a wary eye on the still-smoldering wreckage of South Korea's currency, Brazil is struggling to avoid a similar fate, convinced that a strong real is the key to keeping its three-year economic boom intact. But does Brazil's currency, thought by many economists to be 15% to 30% too rich compared with the dollar, stand a chance of avoiding a devaluation similar to the one South Korea finally bowed to after months of maneuvering and speculation?
BUSINESS
March 18, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While much of Latin America simmers with financial worries, Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo is celebrating pledges by foreign business executives to increase their direct investments in Mexico by 8% this year. At a festive breakfast at Zedillo's official residence Tuesday, the government announced that the largest foreign corporations in Mexico would invest $10 billion this year, opening 238 new factories and creating 41,000 new jobs.
WORLD
October 8, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top two finishers in Brazil's presidential election began a three-week runoff campaign Monday that promises to present voters with two very different visions of the future of this economically troubled country. Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, the leftist Workers Party candidate, will take a big lead into the Oct. 27 election, having won 46% of the vote in Sunday's first round, double the total of the second-place finisher, Jose Serra of the ruling Social Democratic Party of Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
In 42 years of reporting about the Amazon, Lucio Flavio Pinto has been cursed, kicked, beaten, repeatedly threatened with death and sued 33 times. More than half of these legal dust-ups were instigated by his former employer, O Liberal, the region's biggest, most important media company, whose late family patriarch used to be one of Pinto's best friends.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a wary eye on the still-smoldering wreckage of South Korea's currency, Brazil is struggling to avoid a similar fate, convinced that a strong real is the key to keeping its three-year economic boom intact. But does Brazil's currency, thought by many economists to be 15% to 30% too rich compared with the dollar, stand a chance of avoiding a devaluation similar to the one South Korea finally bowed to after months of maneuvering and speculation?
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