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BUSINESS
December 25, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Nasdaq Japan, the Japanese version of the dealer-run Nasdaq Stock Market in the U.S., will begin trading by mid-2000, six months earlier than planned, the U.S. National Assn. of Securities Dealers and Japan's Softbank Corp. said. The NASD-Softbank alliance signed an agreement with the Osaka Securities Exchange under which Japan's second-largest stock exchange will provide surveillance, trade settlement and company-listing services for Nasdaq Japan.
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BUSINESS
July 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Stocks fell overseas Wednesday, pulled lower chiefly by the technology and telecommunications sectors. U.S. markets were closed for the Independence Day holiday. They will reopen today. In Japan, the 225-issue Nikkei stock average declined 1.5%, weighed down by selling in blue-chip technology shares, including Sony, Matsushita Electric Industrial, Hitachi, TDK and NEC.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO and WALTER HAMILTON
If only you had a nickel for every time someone called the Japanese stock market a "bargain" over the last eight years. Tokyo share prices are on a fresh downward trajectory, with the Nikkei-225 index threatening to fall below 15,000 again, weighed down by East Asia's worsening economic and social woes. After bottoming at 14,664 on Jan. 12 amid Indonesia's currency collapse, the Nikkei had rallied 18% to 17,264 by March 2.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Nasdaq Japan, the Japanese version of the dealer-run Nasdaq Stock Market in the U.S., will begin trading by mid-2000, six months earlier than planned, the U.S. National Assn. of Securities Dealers and Japan's Softbank Corp. said. The NASD-Softbank alliance signed an agreement with the Osaka Securities Exchange under which Japan's second-largest stock exchange will provide surveillance, trade settlement and company-listing services for Nasdaq Japan.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tokyo Market Drops in Early Trading: Japanese stocks fell to a three-week low today after an unexpected surge in U.S. jobs signaled that interest rates may be forced higher globally by the threat of inflation. All of the Topix index's 33 industry groups' stocks fell. Interest rate-sensitive groups, such as insurance, real estate and steelmakers, declined the most. The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average fell 236.64, or 1.06%, to 21,995.78, the lowest since June 12.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1994 | From Reuters
For investors in Japanese stocks, brokers and analysts here are singing a familiar tune: Things will stay bad for the next couple of months, but wait for better times next year. Skeptics will remember the tune from earlier this year, last year and the year before that.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1992 | From Reuters
Japan is expected to invest up to $14 billion in the Tokyo stock market in an attempt to head off any repeat of the weakness that gripped stock prices earlier this year, traders and analysts said Tuesday. Giant government institutions such as the Postal Savings and Postal Life Insurance systems are said to be ready to start making big investments by as early as next week. The 225-share Nikkei average ended 216.48 points, or 1.20%, higher at 18,282.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stock market here ended the fiscal year far short of the government's unofficial target Tuesday, disappointing policymakers and threatening a new downward spiral for Japan's economy. By midday today the disappointment was palpable, as stocks tumbled again and the yen hovered near six-year lows. For weeks, top officials of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party declared they wanted the Nikkei-225 stock index to end the 1997 fiscal year above the 18,000 level, equal to last year's close.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991
The Tokyo stock market took a roller-coaster ride last week after starting a slide on Nov. 13 that broke a two-decade-long record for the number of consecutive declines. The market remains in a deep slump, reflecting investors wariness about the Japanese economy which is suffering from a slower rate of growth, declining corporate profits and rising bankruptcies. On Friday, the 225-issue Nikkei stock average closed down 14.11 points at 22,441.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Japanese companies get in trouble and their chief executives resign, the contrite companies typically promise to hansei suru, to reflect on their deeds, presumably with an intent to reform.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO and WALTER HAMILTON
If only you had a nickel for every time someone called the Japanese stock market a "bargain" over the last eight years. Tokyo share prices are on a fresh downward trajectory, with the Nikkei-225 index threatening to fall below 15,000 again, weighed down by East Asia's worsening economic and social woes. After bottoming at 14,664 on Jan. 12 amid Indonesia's currency collapse, the Nikkei had rallied 18% to 17,264 by March 2.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stock market here ended the fiscal year far short of the government's unofficial target Tuesday, disappointing policymakers and threatening a new downward spiral for Japan's economy. By midday today the disappointment was palpable, as stocks tumbled again and the yen hovered near six-year lows. For weeks, top officials of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party declared they wanted the Nikkei-225 stock index to end the 1997 fiscal year above the 18,000 level, equal to last year's close.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | RUSS WILES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're worried about the high-flying U.S. stock market, you might want to shift some money into international mutual funds. Believe it or not, you should even consider funds with hefty stakes in Japan. At first glance, that might not sound too enticing. After all, who would want to pull money out of the robust American stock market and redeploy it in Japan, where investment profits in recent years have been as scarce as elbow room on the Tokyo subway?
BUSINESS
July 8, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tokyo Market Drops in Early Trading: Japanese stocks fell to a three-week low today after an unexpected surge in U.S. jobs signaled that interest rates may be forced higher globally by the threat of inflation. All of the Topix index's 33 industry groups' stocks fell. Interest rate-sensitive groups, such as insurance, real estate and steelmakers, declined the most. The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average fell 236.64, or 1.06%, to 21,995.78, the lowest since June 12.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
For years, Japan's ownership of many billions of dollars worth of U.S. Treasury bonds has carried with it an implied threat: If the Japanese ever chose to sell en masse, they could conceivably cause a market meltdown. On Friday, rumors of such a premeditated dumping of U.S. bonds by Japan--supposedly ordered by the country's Ministry of Finance--swept through Wall Street, triggering the worst one-day selloff in bonds since last September and sending yields soaring.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1994 | From Reuters
For investors in Japanese stocks, brokers and analysts here are singing a familiar tune: Things will stay bad for the next couple of months, but wait for better times next year. Skeptics will remember the tune from earlier this year, last year and the year before that.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The past few years have been a nightmare for investors who plowed money into the Japanese stock market through a growing number of Asia-oriented mutual funds. Thanks to a slowing economy and disappointing corporate earnings, Japanese stocks have fallen steeply from their late-1989 peak. As a result, mutual fund investors have seen their shares decline an average of 25.5% the past year, according to Lipper Analytical Services in New York.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
For years, Japan's ownership of many billions of dollars worth of U.S. Treasury bonds has carried with it an implied threat: If the Japanese ever chose to sell en masse, they could conceivably cause a market meltdown. On Friday, rumors of such a premeditated dumping of U.S. bonds by Japan--supposedly ordered by the country's Ministry of Finance--swept through Wall Street, triggering the worst one-day selloff in bonds since last September and sending yields soaring.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1992 | From Reuters
Japan is expected to invest up to $14 billion in the Tokyo stock market in an attempt to head off any repeat of the weakness that gripped stock prices earlier this year, traders and analysts said Tuesday. Giant government institutions such as the Postal Savings and Postal Life Insurance systems are said to be ready to start making big investments by as early as next week. The 225-share Nikkei average ended 216.48 points, or 1.20%, higher at 18,282.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The past few years have been a nightmare for investors who plowed money into the Japanese stock market through a growing number of Asia-oriented mutual funds. Thanks to a slowing economy and disappointing corporate earnings, Japanese stocks have fallen steeply from their late-1989 peak. As a result, mutual fund investors have seen their shares decline an average of 25.5% the past year, according to Lipper Analytical Services in New York.
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