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BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. stock mutual fund investors, the great 1990s bull market party was crashed by a tsunami from abroad in the third quarter. And that wave quickly submerged virtually every type of stock fund. Perhaps Sheldon Jacobs, editor of the No-Load Fund Investor newsletter, summed it up best: It was a quarter when "nothing worked" for most stock fund investors. Of the 28 stock fund categories tracked by Morningstar Inc., 27 lost money in the quarter ended Sept. 30.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. stock mutual fund investors, the great 1990s bull market party was crashed by a tsunami from abroad in the third quarter. And that wave quickly submerged virtually every type of stock fund. Perhaps Sheldon Jacobs, editor of the No-Load Fund Investor newsletter, summed it up best: It was a quarter when "nothing worked" for most stock fund investors. Of the 28 stock fund categories tracked by Morningstar Inc., 27 lost money in the quarter ended Sept. 30.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A yearlong plunge in real estate stock prices has sent the first ripples of consolidation across the REIT industry. In recent weeks, two mid-size real estate investment trusts, Bedford Property Investors Inc. and MGI Properties, announced plans to liquidate their real estate holdings, and a third, Franklin Select Property Trust, has said it is considering a corporate sale.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A yearlong plunge in real estate stock prices has sent the first ripples of consolidation across the REIT industry. In recent weeks, two mid-size real estate investment trusts, Bedford Property Investors Inc. and MGI Properties, announced plans to liquidate their real estate holdings, and a third, Franklin Select Property Trust, has said it is considering a corporate sale.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1997
All major U.S. stock markets recently began quoting shares in increments of sixteenths, shifting from the one-eighth increments that had dominated for two centuries. The move is a big step in the move toward decimal pricing, still a year or more away. In the interim, to help readers quickly translate increasingly tinier fractions in the stock tables, The Times offers this chart as a clip-and-save reference. *--* 8ths 16ths 32nds 64ths Decimals 1 $0.02 1 2 0.03 3 0.05 1 2 4 0.06 5 0.08 3 6 0.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Walton family of Wal-Mart renown ranked as the world's richest this year with a fortune totaling $23.6 billion, Forbes magazine reports. Japanese hotel and railroad magnate Yoshiaki Tsutsumi was the richest individual, according to the magazine's annual ranking of billionaires, released Monday. Taken together, the billionaires--both families and individuals--have become a less-exclusive group, with their ranks swelling by 47 to 358 from a year ago, the magazine says in its July 18 issue.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1994 | RUSS WILES, RUSS WILES, a financial writer for the Arizona Republic, specializes in mutual funds.
The sideshow's over, and it's time to head back to the main tent. That's the way Michael Perelstein, lead portfolio manager for two new MainStay International funds, sizes up the global-investment arena. At a time when investors' passion for emerging stock markets has never been higher, Perelstein is recommending that fund shareholders get back to basics--which in his view means the established foreign markets of Western Europe and Japan.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1987 | A. GARY SHILLING, A. Gary Shilling is a New York-based economic consultant and author of "The World Has Definitely Changed," published by Lakeview Press in December.
Today's economic conditions are very similar to those of the late 1920s that ushered in the Great Depression. Then, just as now, pervasive surpluses spurred fierce international competition, with many countries resorting to protectionism. International debt problems emerged, and weak prices and outright deflation plagued commodity markets. In addition, stocks were about as buoyant as they have been in the 1980s. Even the insider trading scandals of the two eras have much in common.
OPINION
June 23, 2002 | KEVIN PHILLIPS, Kevin Phillips' most recent book is "Wealth and Democracy: A Political History of the American Rich."
The lurid 2002 portrait of the U.S. economy as a bunch of Enrons and Tycos, overpaid CEOs running corporations like casinos, electronic speculators, predatory hedge funds, fraudulent stock values, deceptive investment firms and collusive accountants didn't develop overnight. Unfortunately, while some of the excesses may shrink, they are not likely to fade away. That's because much of the "financialization" that occurred in the 1980s and 1990s has been built into the system, save for the possible purgative of a market crash.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1997
All major U.S. stock markets recently began quoting shares in increments of sixteenths, shifting from the one-eighth increments that had dominated for two centuries. The move is a big step in the move toward decimal pricing, still a year or more away. In the interim, to help readers quickly translate increasingly tinier fractions in the stock tables, The Times offers this chart as a clip-and-save reference. *--* 8ths 16ths 32nds 64ths Decimals 1 $0.02 1 2 0.03 3 0.05 1 2 4 0.06 5 0.08 3 6 0.
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