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NEWS
February 19, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Ling figured he was into a sure thing. During his first four months playing the fledgling Shenzhen stock market, Ling had seen a 50,000 yuan ($9,600) investment in shares of the Shenzhen Development Bank double in value. "It's very good," he said cheerfully, adding that some of his initial funds came from relatives in the nearby British colony of Hong Kong. "Stock can earn you a lot of money--more than your salary, more even than Westerners make."
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NEWS
February 19, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Ling figured he was into a sure thing. During his first four months playing the fledgling Shenzhen stock market, Ling had seen a 50,000 yuan ($9,600) investment in shares of the Shenzhen Development Bank double in value. "It's very good," he said cheerfully, adding that some of his initial funds came from relatives in the nearby British colony of Hong Kong. "Stock can earn you a lot of money--more than your salary, more even than Westerners make."
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BUSINESS
July 4, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
China is drafting laws that allow five-year jail terms for securities fraud and better regulation of foreign investors' shares, to boost confidence in its slumping stock markets, major papers reported. The national regulations for B-shares, traded only by foreign investors, should be issued before the end of the year, the official China Daily reported Sunday. The laws will improve the issuing and trading of these shares, it said.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's recent moves to restrict imports and increase foreign sales have put that giant Asian nation on a collision course with the United States, an issue expected to dominate this week's annual meeting of a top U.S. and China trade commission in Washington. In a meeting today with China's Minister of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation, Shi Guangsheng, U.S.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government, attempting to quell rampant rumors about the failing health of senior leader Deng Xiaoping that sent stock markets reeling, declared Tuesday that there was "no great change" in the 92-year-old's condition. "There has been no great change in Comrade Deng Xiaoping's health situation," Foreign Ministry spokesman Tang Guoqiang said. "I have no new information to provide."
BUSINESS
July 26, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stocks pulled back Monday as oil prices seesawed and investors took profits in some of the market's recent leaders. Yields on shorter-term Treasury yields rose to fresh four-year highs on expectations that the Federal Reserve would continue to tighten credit. In a lackluster session overall, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 54.70 points, or 0.5%, to 10,596.48. Share prices started the day with a modest rally, then drifted lower until the closing bell.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Receding worries about Brazil's economic problems touched off a global rally in stock markets Monday, after the troubled country's central bank said it would continue to float its currency. That may set a good tone today for Wall Street, which on Monday observed the Martin Luther King holiday. Brazil's own market gained 5.4% on Monday, building on Friday's 33.4% rebound after the country's authorities said they would no longer try to defend the currency's value.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2008 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
China's main stock index plummeted 7.7% on Tuesday, its biggest drop in a year, leading a second straight day of broad declines in Asia amid worries over inflation and slower economic growth. The 257-point loss brought the Shanghai composite index to 3,072 points, the lowest close since March 2007.
OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Eric J. Weiner
Can anyone talk to China anymore? It's an increasingly important question for the United States and the rest of the world to ponder as the emerging giant asserts itself globally. The House voted overwhelmingly last week to give President Obama sweeping authority to impose steep tariffs on Chinese imports. The move was aimed at retaliating against Beijing's monetary policy, which essentially keeps the value of the nation's currency artificially low so Chinese manufacturers can dump cheap exports on developed economies.
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