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Stockard Channing

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | PATRICK PACHECO
When Stockard Channing received the call to join the cast of "Six Degrees of Separation," she had just finished starring in the pre-Broadway engagement of "Jake's Women," the first Neil Simon play to close out of town. About the last thing she wanted to do was jump into another play. Yet Blythe Danner, who had originally been cast in the pivotal role of Ouisa in "Six Degrees," had just quit the production and a replacement was desperately needed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
A few weeks back, I reviewed the movie "Pulling Strings," a bilingual, cross-cultural romantic comedy set around the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City. I found the film to be unexpectedly charming, with a sort of breezy appeal many recent Hollywood rom-coms strain toward but fail to achieve. My review made a mention of the actress Stockard Channing, noting that she "steals every scene she's in because, well, she's Stockard Channing. " This was followed by a parenthetical: "About all that need be said of Tom Arnold's performance as a bumbling embassy administrator is that he is not Stockard Channing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2009 | Associated Press
If you want Stockard Channing eating out of your hand -- and who wouldn't? -- just compliment her pipes. The 64-year-old Tony and Emmy winner is singing on Broadway for the first time since 1984 and would appreciate a little encouragement. Channing has four songs in the update of the Richard Rogers-Lorenz Hart musical "Pal Joey," including the stunning "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered." "It's great to sing again," she says before a recent performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hot on the heels of the surprise success of "Instructions Not Included," which quickly became the all-time highest-grossing Spanish language film in the U.S., comes another movie aimed at the same audience. "Pulling Strings," also being released by "Instructions" distributor Pantelion Films, looks to do potential crossover audiences one better with a story that allows the language to be split between Spanish and English. Serving mostly as a strong calling card for star Jaime Camil, the film has an appealingly loose, slightly ramshackle charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Susan King
STOCKARD CHANNING had to make up her mind about whether to commit to star in the new CBS sitcom "Out of Practice," which premieres Monday at 9:30 p.m, right after the network's most popular comedy series, "Two and a Half Men." But it was a no-brainer decision for the lithe 61-year-old actress, who has won a Tony (for "Joe Egg" 20 years ago), two Emmys in 2002 for "The West Wing" and the TV movie "The Matthew Shepard Story," and an Oscar nomination for 1993's "Six Degrees of Separation."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2001 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During a dinner at one of the film festivals this year, a middle-age female executive started rhapsodizing about a film called "The Business of Strangers." Essentially she was saying, "That's me!" The character provoking such reaction is played by Stockard Channing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1993 | ROGER D. FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a front corner table of Mortimer's on Lexington Avenue, playwright John Guare (silver haired, bow-tied, eyes twinkling with mischief) and actress Stockard Channing (blond-streaked and engagingly caustic in tortoise shell sunglasses) playfully jab at one another over baked apples and crab cakes. "We've known each other for 23 years," remarks Channing wryly as a photographer shoots away. "Has it been 23?" asks Guare with mock surprise. "I guess so."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hot on the heels of the surprise success of "Instructions Not Included," which quickly became the all-time highest-grossing Spanish language film in the U.S., comes another movie aimed at the same audience. "Pulling Strings," also being released by "Instructions" distributor Pantelion Films, looks to do potential crossover audiences one better with a story that allows the language to be split between Spanish and English. Serving mostly as a strong calling card for star Jaime Camil, the film has an appealingly loose, slightly ramshackle charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | Kirk Honeycutt \f7
Cybill Shepherd, Ron Silver, Beau Bridges, Stockard Channing, Mary Stuart Masterson and Robert Sean Leonard play three married couples in Orion Pictures' "Married to It." Arthur Hiller will direct Janet Kovalcik's drama starting July 30 in New York and Toronto.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2009 | Associated Press
If you want Stockard Channing eating out of your hand -- and who wouldn't? -- just compliment her pipes. The 64-year-old Tony and Emmy winner is singing on Broadway for the first time since 1984 and would appreciate a little encouragement. Channing has four songs in the update of the Richard Rogers-Lorenz Hart musical "Pal Joey," including the stunning "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered." "It's great to sing again," she says before a recent performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Susan King
STOCKARD CHANNING had to make up her mind about whether to commit to star in the new CBS sitcom "Out of Practice," which premieres Monday at 9:30 p.m, right after the network's most popular comedy series, "Two and a Half Men." But it was a no-brainer decision for the lithe 61-year-old actress, who has won a Tony (for "Joe Egg" 20 years ago), two Emmys in 2002 for "The West Wing" and the TV movie "The Matthew Shepard Story," and an Oscar nomination for 1993's "Six Degrees of Separation."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2003 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
It was a simple idea. Take Joseph L. Mankiewicz's classic screenplay for "All About Eve," adapt it as a staged reading, line up some stars, and use it to make money to benefit Actors' Fund of America. When playwright David Rambo took that idea to friend David Michaels at the fund, Michaels was immediately interested. Hollywood's 1950 depiction of Broadway ambition gone mad was nominated for 14 Academy Awards -- a record not even tied until 1997's "Titanic" -- and won six.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Stettner's crackling, unpredictable "The Business of Strangers" teams Stockard Channing, a commanding presence in all media, and Julia Stiles, one of the most fearless and talented young actresses in Hollywood today. In a singularly confident feature debut, Stettner keeps us wondering whether he's setting in motion a highly charged drama or a suspense thriller, and this uncertainty pays off most effectively at the finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2001 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During a dinner at one of the film festivals this year, a middle-age female executive started rhapsodizing about a film called "The Business of Strangers." Essentially she was saying, "That's me!" The character provoking such reaction is played by Stockard Channing.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
What seems to start out as a burlesque against the rich ends up mutating into something stranger and much more ambiguous. Art dealers Louisa (Stockard Channing) and Flanders Kittredge (Donald Sutherland) are East Side elites who live out their tony lives inside the galaxies of the super-rich but they're hand-to-mouth wealthy. Suddenly, they're confronted by a young black man (Will Smith, pictured) who claims to be friends with their children at Harvard.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | Craig Modderno
Sarah Jessica Parker is a pregnant student who seeks advice from boarding-house owner Stockard Channing in the TV movie "The Room Upstairs," filming in Vancouver. . . . Ben Frank is a casino pit boss who has an alien encounter with Robert Hays in an episode of "Starman," now filming in Reno. . . . Bruce Dern is a Kentucky coal baron whose marriage to Lisa Hartman causes the death of himself and his business in the CBS miniseries "Roses Are for the Rich," now shooting in Alabama. . . .
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
What seems to start out as a burlesque against the rich ends up mutating into something stranger and much more ambiguous. Art dealers Louisa (Stockard Channing) and Flanders Kittredge (Donald Sutherland) are East Side elites who live out their tony lives inside the galaxies of the super-rich but they're hand-to-mouth wealthy. Suddenly, they're confronted by a young black man (Will Smith, pictured) who claims to be friends with their children at Harvard.
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