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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
International health officials are expected to decide this week whether to hold on to the last remaining stockpiles of smallpox, one of the deadliest diseases in history – or to proceed with their destruction. The U.S. argues that scientists need access to the virus for just a while longer -- saying they need more time to develop antiviral drugs and vaccines in preparation for a potential terrorist attack that everyone hopes never comes. The Wall Street Journal explains the U.S. position, while also pointing out that other countries are convinced the risk of an accidental release isn’t worth taking.  At stake in the discussion – taking place at an annual meeting of the World Health Organization – are stockpiles at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and at a Russian government laboratory.
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WORLD
February 25, 2011 | By Julia Damianova, Los Angeles Times
Iran increased its stockpile of low-enriched uranium in recent months despite intense international pressure and claims that a computer virus had slowed its program, a report Friday by the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency indicates. At the beginning of February, according to the report prepared for the board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran had nearly 8,000 pounds of uranium enriched to 3.5%, a quantity sufficient for about three nuclear weapons if further enriched to 90%. The U.S. and its allies suspect Iran of seeking to develop atomic weapons; Iran contends that its program is for peaceful purposes only.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2011 | By Matea Gold and Tom Hamburger, Washington Bureau
By one measure, the 2012 presidential campaign is off to a slow start. No major candidate has officially jumped in, unlike four years ago, when nine White House hopefuls had declared their bids by the end of January 2007. Mindful that the first nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire might be pushed back a month, and wary of an anti-incumbent mood among voters that could make life difficult for a front-runner, potential Republican candidates are staying on the sidelines for now. But by another measure ?
NATIONAL
January 22, 2011 | By Matea Gold and Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
By one measure, the 2012 presidential campaign is off to a slow start. No major candidate has officially jumped in, unlike four years ago, when nine White House hopefuls had declared their bids by the end of January 2007. Mindful that the first nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire might be pushed back a month, and wary of an anti-incumbent mood among voters that could make life difficult for a front-runner, potential Republican candidates are staying on the sidelines for now. But by another measure -- money -- the campaign is in high gear.
WORLD
December 1, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, his confident bluntness on full display, has declared Russia might build up its nuclear weapons instead of reducing them if the New START treaty arranged with the Obama administration is not ratified by Congress. If the treaty is held up by U.S. legislators showing "a very dumb nature" then Russia will "have to react somehow," Putin said in an interview with CNN's Larry King scheduled for broadcast Wednesday. Putin said the treaty, which calls for reducing the maximum nuclear warheads in each country from 2,200 to 1,550, is in the best interest of the United States.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Already worried about runaway real estate prices that have shut millions out of the housing market, China's leaders are grappling with yet another threat to social stability: the soaring price of food. The nation's State Council on Wednesday announced that it would move to stabilize prices by cracking down on speculators and boosting supplies of some staples from government stockpiles. Beijing also urged local authorities to provide food subsidies to the neediest families. Rising food prices are the biggest driver of inflation in China, whose leaders have been struggling to downshift the nation's surging economy.
WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim
Iran's top political and religious authority lashed out at the United States at a nuclear disarmament conference Saturday in Tehran meant to counter a nonproliferation summit in Washington earlier in the week. Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, described the United States as the world's "only nuclear scofflaw." He called Washington hypocritical for advocating arms control while retaining a huge nuclear weapons stockpile, and for accepting the atomic arsenal of Israel.
WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By Paul Richter and Christi Parsons
Reporting from Washington and Prague, Czech Republic -- President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed a treaty Thursday to shrink their nuclear arsenals, hoping to open an era of improved relations between the former superpower foes while launching an arms-control agenda extending far into the future. The two leaders met in the gilded majesty of a medieval castle in Prague, once a city at the epicenter of Cold War tension, and formally agreed to bring their nations' arsenals to their lowest levels since half a century ago, the days of the Cuban missile crisis, which brought the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of nuclear war. But the signing of the pact in the Czech capital also pointed to challenges confronting Obama as he offers a plan to control the world's nuclear arms and address future international security threats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2010 | By Kimi Yoshino
The Medical Board of California has accused a Beverly Hills fertility doctor of a pattern of gross negligence that led to the birth of Nadya Suleman's 14 children, including the world's longest-surviving octuplets, and created a "stockpile" of unused frozen embryos which serve "no clinical purpose." The 13-page accusation filed in December against Dr. Michael Kamrava paints a picture of 11 years of medical care in which Suleman returned to Kamrava's office again and again to undergo fertility treatments.
NATIONAL
January 4, 2010 | By Paul Richter
President Obama's ambitious plan to begin phasing out nuclear weapons has run up against powerful resistance from officials in the Pentagon and other U.S. agencies, posing a threat to one of his most important foreign policy initiatives. Obama laid out his vision of a nuclear-free world in a speech in Prague, Czech Republic, last April, pledging that the U.S. would take dramatic steps to lead the way. Nine months later, the administration is locked in internal debate over a top-secret policy blueprint for shrinking the U.S. nuclear arsenal and reducing the role of such weapons in America's military strategy and foreign policy.
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