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BUSINESS
February 4, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Although the city stockyards are merely a shadow of what they used to be, Omaha remains the capital of America's meat industry. Sales are made in the alleyways and in the 2,000 pens at the Omaha stockyards, or in auction arenas where auctioneers with rapid-fire, sing-song chants cry out the bids received for livestock. As sales take place, eight U.S. Department of Agriculture market reporters jot down prices paid for cattle, hogs and sheep.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although they're huddled close, the tens of thousands of cattle are remarkably quiet. The cowboys traversing the blocks-long boardwalk above hear only the occasional bellow below. In familiar hats, jeans and boots, the men ? and some women ? make their way toward the bustling auction arena. Some come to the Oklahoma National Stock Yards just to watch the bustle of cattle, but most come, checkbook in hand, to bid and to buy. This has been going on in Oklahoma City for 100 years, since cattlemen began bringing their critters to market here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1991
Why is it when the air conditioning of schools is debated for the San Fernando Valley no mention is ever made that all administrative offices have air conditioning? Also, most principals' offices have air conditioning. It has been so for the last 30 years. Administrators have always had their own agendas. MICKEY MANDELL West Hills
OPINION
March 31, 2008
Unless you're a vegetarian, chances are you have no idea whether you bought meat from a Chino slaughterhouse that has been the subject of the biggest beef recall in U.S. history. The scrutiny of the Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Co. recall has brought to public light what consumer groups have long fretted over: The U.S. Department of Agriculture lacks a coherent system for tracking meat from stockyard to grocery bag.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | United Press International
Firefighters from a dozen communities were unable to save the venerable National Stock Yards exchange building, which burned today in a spectacular blaze believed to have started in a restaurant. Buildings in the stockyard complex date from the late 19th Century. The fire was reported at 3:39 a.m. in the west wing of the U-shaped structure and within four hours most of the building was in ruins. Despite the fire, livestock sales were not disrupted.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | WILLIAM H. INMAN, United Press International
In the old days, when this town was a little less sophisticated and a lot more shameless, cowboys used to gather in Hell's Half Acre to wager at cards, knock back whiskey and fight over women. Butch Cassidy and his Hole in the Wall Gang divided the Union Pacific payroll at Fannie Porter's house of ill repute. Bonnie Parker trysted with Clyde Barrow at the Right Hotel.
SPORTS
October 12, 1986 | RICH TOSCHES, Times Staff Writer
It is the weekend. Night clubs, theatres and arenas are alive with music. And fireplaces are crackling throughout the neighborhood. But for some people, there is only one Friday or Saturday night sound.
OPINION
March 31, 2008
Unless you're a vegetarian, chances are you have no idea whether you bought meat from a Chino slaughterhouse that has been the subject of the biggest beef recall in U.S. history. The scrutiny of the Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Co. recall has brought to public light what consumer groups have long fretted over: The U.S. Department of Agriculture lacks a coherent system for tracking meat from stockyard to grocery bag.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | MIKE COCHRAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cowtown awakened one recent morning to learn it no longer was Cowtown. Well, sort of. "Going, going . . . gone," announced a headline decorating the front page of the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram. Atop the story, the chilling news: "The 100-year era of cattle auctions at the Ft. Worth Stockyards comes to an end." No longer economically feasible, a spokesman explained. Balderdash! Strip the heart from San Francisco or the French Quarter from New Orleans.
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although they're huddled close, the tens of thousands of cattle are remarkably quiet. The cowboys traversing the blocks-long boardwalk above hear only the occasional bellow below. In familiar hats, jeans and boots, the men ? and some women ? make their way toward the bustling auction arena. Some come to the Oklahoma National Stock Yards just to watch the bustle of cattle, but most come, checkbook in hand, to bid and to buy. This has been going on in Oklahoma City for 100 years, since cattlemen began bringing their critters to market here.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | ERIC FIDLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is called the City of Big Shoulders, a tough town whose image is rooted in a brawling, bloody past that's part truth and part fiction. Don't bother trying to keep up with Chicago, Mark Twain advised more than a century ago. "She outgrows her prophecies faster than she can make them. She is always a novelty, for she is never the Chicago you saw when you passed through the last time." Sure enough, those Big Shoulders are shrugging again, putting Chicago through yet another transformation.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | MIKE COCHRAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cowtown awakened one recent morning to learn it no longer was Cowtown. Well, sort of. "Going, going . . . gone," announced a headline decorating the front page of the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram. Atop the story, the chilling news: "The 100-year era of cattle auctions at the Ft. Worth Stockyards comes to an end." No longer economically feasible, a spokesman explained. Balderdash! Strip the heart from San Francisco or the French Quarter from New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1991
Why is it when the air conditioning of schools is debated for the San Fernando Valley no mention is ever made that all administrative offices have air conditioning? Also, most principals' offices have air conditioning. It has been so for the last 30 years. Administrators have always had their own agendas. MICKEY MANDELL West Hills
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | WILLIAM H. INMAN, United Press International
In the old days, when this town was a little less sophisticated and a lot more shameless, cowboys used to gather in Hell's Half Acre to wager at cards, knock back whiskey and fight over women. Butch Cassidy and his Hole in the Wall Gang divided the Union Pacific payroll at Fannie Porter's house of ill repute. Bonnie Parker trysted with Clyde Barrow at the Right Hotel.
SPORTS
October 12, 1986 | RICH TOSCHES, Times Staff Writer
It is the weekend. Night clubs, theatres and arenas are alive with music. And fireplaces are crackling throughout the neighborhood. But for some people, there is only one Friday or Saturday night sound.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | United Press International
Firefighters from a dozen communities were unable to save the venerable National Stock Yards exchange building, which burned today in a spectacular blaze believed to have started in a restaurant. Buildings in the stockyard complex date from the late 19th Century. The fire was reported at 3:39 a.m. in the west wing of the U-shaped structure and within four hours most of the building was in ruins. Despite the fire, livestock sales were not disrupted.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | ERIC FIDLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is called the City of Big Shoulders, a tough town whose image is rooted in a brawling, bloody past that's part truth and part fiction. Don't bother trying to keep up with Chicago, Mark Twain advised more than a century ago. "She outgrows her prophecies faster than she can make them. She is always a novelty, for she is never the Chicago you saw when you passed through the last time." Sure enough, those Big Shoulders are shrugging again, putting Chicago through yet another transformation.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1985 | Associated Press
The Chicago Mercantile Exchange is again considering closing the two remaining delivery points east of the Mississippi River for cattle sold on futures markets--at Peoria and Joliet. The exchange withdrew an earlier request for the closures last month, bowing to opposition from area livestock growers.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Although the city stockyards are merely a shadow of what they used to be, Omaha remains the capital of America's meat industry. Sales are made in the alleyways and in the 2,000 pens at the Omaha stockyards, or in auction arenas where auctioneers with rapid-fire, sing-song chants cry out the bids received for livestock. As sales take place, eight U.S. Department of Agriculture market reporters jot down prices paid for cattle, hogs and sheep.
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