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NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Meat in the U.S. may be widely contaminated with strains of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers reported Friday. Nearly half of all meat and poultry sampled in a new study contained drug-resistant strains of  Staphylococcus aureus , the type of bacteria that most commonly causes staph infections. Such infections can take many forms, from a minor rash to pneumonia or sepsis. But the findings are less about direct threats to humans than they are about the risks of using antibiotics in agriculture.
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OPINION
September 20, 2008
Re "Thoreau's moose," Opinion, Sept. 14 Thank you, Paul Theroux, for reminding us of yet another salient difference between Republicans and Democrats -- the love of hunting as sport. I wonder, has Palin read my favorite of all Dr. Seuss books, "Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose," to her children, or is this one that she would-if-she-could have removed from the Wasilla library shelves? To think that the ability to "field-dress" a moose is evidence of ability to lead and worthy of cheers is mind-boggling.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | CHRISTY PORTER, Porter is a free-lance writer in Spokane, Wash.
Circling crows appear like smudges on the pale winter sky, occasionally swooping to peck at frozen road-kill. The last few miles on Highway 15 from Helena to the Butte stockyards are harsh and not that pretty. At the yard, Ralph Beer struggles against a 1,200-pound cow and the cold wind until the animal is finally in the auction stall. Then Beer lights a cigarette, perches on a rickety fence gate and muses on the state of literature in Montana.
BOOKS
November 10, 1991 | RICHARD EDER
A problem novel is a problem. If it is a detective story, say, or an exposure of conditions in the Chicago stockyards, we take it on its own singleminded level--solving the mystery or learning about the conditions. It needs to be lucidly and enthrallingly expounded; apart from that, we are simply grateful for whatever adornments of style or character may be thrown in. When it is a full-fledged work of fiction, though, we feel two currents tug against each other.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.), who is under investigation by the House Ethics Committee, Monday portrayed himself as a victim of a campaign of leaks and "poison arrows" by Reagan Administration officials. Wright, who frequently has denied charges that he used his influence to benefit himself and his friends, insisted that he "would not be under the pressure" of an internal House investigation if he had not challenged President Reagan's policy in Central America. " . . .
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
My day was made Tuesday, upon reading that San Diego is searching for its own city song. San Diego, city that never sleeps. San Diego, my kind of town. I left my heart in San Diego. No, wait. It was my wallet. San Diego continues to be one of the truly outstanding cities in the greater metropolitan Tijuana area. The town deserves a tune. San Diego is marvelous, too marvelous for words. Many of us believe San Diego to be every bit as special and song-worthy as Galveston, Kalamazoo and Gary, Ind.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2008 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
Joe Penn, a Kentucky horse and mule auctioneer, is not a sentimental man -- not once he enters the stockyard. He knows that the value of many horses is measured in pounds of flesh. But this winter, the horses are thinner than usual, and Penn finds himself wondering what becomes of the creatures with bare ribs and flat rumps, the ones that now sell for as little as $10. "I wonder," Penn said. "And then I tell myself I probably don't want to know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Barbara Sears "Bobo" Rockefeller, a coal miner's daughter and one-time actress whose "Cinderella wedding of the century" to millionaire Winthrop Rockefeller in 1948 soon gave way to bitter divorce proceedings, died Monday at her home in Little Rock, Ark. She was 91. A cause of death was not announced. Born Jievute Paulekiute, she first attracted notice as Miss Lithuania at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. She later was Eva Paul on stage and Barbara Sears on screen. But her international fame -- a Time cover picture, a portrait by Salvador Dali -- was owed to her marriage to Rockefeller, heir to the Standard Oil fortune, a night clubbing bon vivant and one of America's wealthiest bachelors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
The story of recent immigration to the United States, particularly of Central American and post-Vietnam War Asian refugees, is laced with feelings of political dissatisfaction. But, for descendants of 19th-Century Scandinavian immigrants, a century of successful assimilation has left them with feelings of warm nostalgia.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Muriel Gardiner, who as a young student of psychoanalysis in Vienna in the 1930s helped smuggle anti-Fascists out of Austria, died Wednesday at the age of 83 in a Princeton, N.J., medical center, where she was being treated for cancer. Her memoirs were titled "Code Name Mary," but many felt after seeing a 1977 film based on Lillian Hellman's reminiscences that they could as well have been called "Julia."
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