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OPINION
May 1, 2008
Just when everyone is fretting over the price of food, the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production released a report that outlines the ways in which factory farming exacts an additional toll on both the Earth and the consumer. The pollution of streams and groundwater and the greenhouse gases produced by animal waste entail actual dollar costs borne largely by taxpayers, as well as more intrinsic concerns about human health, environmental damage and animal well-being. The good news is that, among the trends laid out in the report, the most troubling is also among the most fixable: overuse of antibiotics in livestock, a major contributor to the creation of drug-resistant bacteria and thus a direct assault on human health.
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NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Meat in the U.S. may be widely contaminated with strains of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers reported Friday. Nearly half of all meat and poultry sampled in a new study contained drug-resistant strains of  Staphylococcus aureus , the type of bacteria that most commonly causes staph infections. Such infections can take many forms, from a minor rash to pneumonia or sepsis. But the findings are less about direct threats to humans than they are about the risks of using antibiotics in agriculture.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The once-mighty Obear-Nester Glass Co., where proud workers used to turn out bottles by the millions, has become just another dead factory in this all-but-dead city--quiet and smoke-dirty, with the sad and seedy look of unused structures everywhere.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | CHRISTY PORTER, Porter is a free-lance writer in Spokane, Wash.
Circling crows appear like smudges on the pale winter sky, occasionally swooping to peck at frozen road-kill. The last few miles on Highway 15 from Helena to the Butte stockyards are harsh and not that pretty. At the yard, Ralph Beer struggles against a 1,200-pound cow and the cold wind until the animal is finally in the auction stall. Then Beer lights a cigarette, perches on a rickety fence gate and muses on the state of literature in Montana.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.), who is under investigation by the House Ethics Committee, Monday portrayed himself as a victim of a campaign of leaks and "poison arrows" by Reagan Administration officials. Wright, who frequently has denied charges that he used his influence to benefit himself and his friends, insisted that he "would not be under the pressure" of an internal House investigation if he had not challenged President Reagan's policy in Central America. " . . .
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
My day was made Tuesday, upon reading that San Diego is searching for its own city song. San Diego, city that never sleeps. San Diego, my kind of town. I left my heart in San Diego. No, wait. It was my wallet. San Diego continues to be one of the truly outstanding cities in the greater metropolitan Tijuana area. The town deserves a tune. San Diego is marvelous, too marvelous for words. Many of us believe San Diego to be every bit as special and song-worthy as Galveston, Kalamazoo and Gary, Ind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Time
Harry Jackson, an acclaimed Western artist who created the bronze equestrian sculpture of cowboy movie legend John Wayne that was installed in front of what was then the Great Western Savings & Loan office building on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills in the 1980s, has died. He was 87. Jackson died Monday at the VA Medical Center in Sheridan, Wyo., after dealing with a number of health issues over the last year, said his son Matthew. The Chicago-born artist was considered one of the most promising New York Abstract Expressionist painters in the early 1950s before he turned to realism and became a highly successful Western artist in the tradition of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Barbara Sears "Bobo" Rockefeller, a coal miner's daughter and one-time actress whose "Cinderella wedding of the century" to millionaire Winthrop Rockefeller in 1948 soon gave way to bitter divorce proceedings, died Monday at her home in Little Rock, Ark. She was 91. A cause of death was not announced. Born Jievute Paulekiute, she first attracted notice as Miss Lithuania at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. She later was Eva Paul on stage and Barbara Sears on screen. But her international fame -- a Time cover picture, a portrait by Salvador Dali -- was owed to her marriage to Rockefeller, heir to the Standard Oil fortune, a night clubbing bon vivant and one of America's wealthiest bachelors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
The story of recent immigration to the United States, particularly of Central American and post-Vietnam War Asian refugees, is laced with feelings of political dissatisfaction. But, for descendants of 19th-Century Scandinavian immigrants, a century of successful assimilation has left them with feelings of warm nostalgia.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Muriel Gardiner, who as a young student of psychoanalysis in Vienna in the 1930s helped smuggle anti-Fascists out of Austria, died Wednesday at the age of 83 in a Princeton, N.J., medical center, where she was being treated for cancer. Her memoirs were titled "Code Name Mary," but many felt after seeing a 1977 film based on Lillian Hellman's reminiscences that they could as well have been called "Julia."
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