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NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
As the founder of the Topeka, Kan.-based Westboro Baptist Church, Fred Phelps made plenty of enemies over the last two decades for protesting at the funerals of gay people and soldiers to spread his church's fire-and-brimstone message. Phelps, 84, died Wednesday night after a stint in hospice care. Many observers wondered whether anyone would protest at his funeral.  Church members said no public funeral was planned and blasted the media's attention to Phelps' death. Here's a roundup of some of Thursday's reactions.
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NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
As the founder of the Topeka, Kan.-based Westboro Baptist Church, Fred Phelps made plenty of enemies over the last two decades for protesting at the funerals of gay people and soldiers to spread his church's fire-and-brimstone message. Phelps, 84, died Wednesday night after a stint in hospice care. Many observers wondered whether anyone would protest at his funeral.  Church members said no public funeral was planned and blasted the media's attention to Phelps' death. Here's a roundup of some of Thursday's reactions.
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NEWS
March 11, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been nearly 2,000 years since the sober men in togas came together in Rome, coaching one another to put aside worldly wants and walk a straight and moral path. But now--in a time of presidential hanky-panky, 24-hour entertainment and murky social values--their ancient creed is being resurrected.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Ask any former NHL player who's about 45 or older if he ever had a concussion and he's likely to say he got his bell rung once or twice but went back out and played. It was unthinkable not to. Stoicism was - and is - as much a part of the game as ice. Medical knowledge about the terrible effects of repeated brain injuries has since advanced. It's flippant to joke about brain injuries after learning of the neurological and behavioral problems experienced by Bob Probert and Derek Boogaard and other NFL players who were posthumously found to have chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or degenerative brain disease.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Ask any former NHL player who's about 45 or older if he ever had a concussion and he's likely to say he got his bell rung once or twice but went back out and played. It was unthinkable not to. Stoicism was - and is - as much a part of the game as ice. Medical knowledge about the terrible effects of repeated brain injuries has since advanced. It's flippant to joke about brain injuries after learning of the neurological and behavioral problems experienced by Bob Probert and Derek Boogaard and other NFL players who were posthumously found to have chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or degenerative brain disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1999
James Rainey's well-written piece on the renewed interest in stoic philosophy (March 11) understandably emphasized the idea that we can control our destinies by mastering our reactions to what life gives to us. Another central tenet of this philosophy merits our attention as well: the stoic conception that duties (and, by extension, moral values) "are universally measured by relations." That is, according to Epictetus, we acquire duties or moral obligations by virtue of the relations in which we find ourselves (e.g.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
Craig Johnson comes as advertised. Standing outside the Autry National Center on a boiling summer afternoon, the Wyoming-based crime novelist is decked out in a long-sleeve shirt made of heavy cotton, scuffed brown boots and a 10-gallon hat that provides shade, but not nearly enough. Spotting his interlocutor, Johnson sticks out his hand and delivers a booming "How ya doin'?!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1994 | STEVE WASSERMAN, Steve Wasserman is editorial director of Times Books, a division of Random House; he was formerly a Los Angeles Times articles editor
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis will be remembered by most Americans as the remarkable First Lady she was: elegant, beautiful, stoic. By any measure she was a heroic woman, and the trajectory of her life compels our respect. I shall remember her, however, less for her public persona than for her private accomplishments, first and foremost as an editor for many years for Doubleday. For it was in that rather invisible capacity that the republic of letters had a most passionate tribune.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2000 | Steve Chawkins
I was sitting at my desk the other day, shifting my position whenever my bulging lumbar disc impinged on my inflamed lumbar nerve, shooting flashes of pain down my left leg. I was trying to think joyful thoughts--sweet babbling brooks, tranquil meadows, Advil--when my mother called from New York. Within seconds, the difference between our generations was crystal clear. Baby boomers like me have been raised to speak of our physical problems openly and in fulsome detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
While in general the key to value in real estate is location, location, location, the value in the specific West Texas real estate created by novelist Cormac McCarthy in "All The Pretty Horses" is a bit different: language, language, language. McCarthy's award-winning book is one of the most beautifully written of the last 10 years, an intoxicating example of words at play.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
There may be radioactive particles wafting out of the sky, but Masahiro Hamaguchi has a more pedestrian concern about the air around him: the dribble of cold, wet snow. A week after the deadly earthquake and even deadlier tsunami that have devastated Japan, newly homeless huddle hungry and cold in emergency shelters. And people are wondering where their government is. "I need something, anything, to warm my body," said Hamaguchi, 58, a burly man trying to stay warm under a thin red raincoat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2011 | Sandy Banks
The "do not resuscitate" paperwork was posted on the refrigerator door. I passed it every time I made my way from my mother-in-law's bedroom to her kitchen, to sort through the basket crammed with pill bottles for the medication she wanted. I kept track of what I parceled out in a "meds log" mounted on the counter. The scribbled notations of family members reflect our efforts at "comfort care" ? dull her pain, quiet her cough, tamp down her anxiety ? and chronicle cancer's deadly encroachment.
WORLD
July 8, 2005 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
The first blasts came from deep under the city, muffled by tons of earth and concrete. A 30-minute pause, and another, louder, explosion in a stately square near the British Museum. And then, an eerie quiet. The people of London had been bracing for this attack for years. When it came, sirens screamed and helicopters buzzed over a city under attack, but a surreal sense of calm seemed to prevail.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2003 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Smoke smothered the sunset. It choked the air with the smell of a thousand campfires as hundreds of people returned to an old airplane hangar in San Bernardino, their last resort after fires chased them from their homes. Many of them had arrived Saturday night from canyon enclaves with names like Rimforest, Running Springs, Cedarpines Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Carrying little more than an abiding passion for Afghanistan, Dr. Cedric Emery and his wife, Norma, flew into Kabul last month with a simple question: How can we help? A few days later, Cedric was doing surgery and Norma, a nurse, was setting up a clinic in an orphanage for 850 children. "I had absolutely no expectations," said Emery, a Ventura urologist. "I thought we might be sitting around drinking tea for a month."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
While in general the key to value in real estate is location, location, location, the value in the specific West Texas real estate created by novelist Cormac McCarthy in "All The Pretty Horses" is a bit different: language, language, language. McCarthy's award-winning book is one of the most beautifully written of the last 10 years, an intoxicating example of words at play.
BOOKS
December 27, 1987 | Hannah Sampson, Sampson is a free-lance critic and essayist. and
"Loop's Progress," the first book of a projected trilogy, was the stuff of disconnections; always stunningly implausible. "Experiments With Life and Deaf," (Vol. II), commences where the first left off. Now the "shticks" become tedious through overkill. (Flattened between colliding trains, your shoelaces come undone. Pure slapstick. A little goes a long way.) As before, hysterical episodes have no aftermath.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2011 | Sandy Banks
The "do not resuscitate" paperwork was posted on the refrigerator door. I passed it every time I made my way from my mother-in-law's bedroom to her kitchen, to sort through the basket crammed with pill bottles for the medication she wanted. I kept track of what I parceled out in a "meds log" mounted on the counter. The scribbled notations of family members reflect our efforts at "comfort care" ? dull her pain, quiet her cough, tamp down her anxiety ? and chronicle cancer's deadly encroachment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2000 | Steve Chawkins
I was sitting at my desk the other day, shifting my position whenever my bulging lumbar disc impinged on my inflamed lumbar nerve, shooting flashes of pain down my left leg. I was trying to think joyful thoughts--sweet babbling brooks, tranquil meadows, Advil--when my mother called from New York. Within seconds, the difference between our generations was crystal clear. Baby boomers like me have been raised to speak of our physical problems openly and in fulsome detail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1999
James Rainey's well-written piece on the renewed interest in stoic philosophy (March 11) understandably emphasized the idea that we can control our destinies by mastering our reactions to what life gives to us. Another central tenet of this philosophy merits our attention as well: the stoic conception that duties (and, by extension, moral values) "are universally measured by relations." That is, according to Epictetus, we acquire duties or moral obligations by virtue of the relations in which we find ourselves (e.g.
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