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Stoke On Trent England

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HOME & GARDEN
December 13, 2007 | David A. Keeps
Over the last decade, ceramic designer Hannah Morrow has lived in London, New York and Los Angeles, chronicling her experiences in the H for Hannah Stickers Collection. The pieces, decorated with graphics and alphabet letters spelling out the names of the three cities, are made from bone china fired in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Her L.A. pieces feature illustrations of sunset-lighted palm trees, surfboards, Spanish missions and Mann Chinese Theatre.
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SPORTS
April 9, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Another chapter in the history of Mike Tyson and postponed fights was written Tuesday when the former heavyweight champion said he would be unable to make his scheduled May 3 rematch with Evander Holyfield after opening a cut over his left eye for the fourth time while training. The cut required 10-12 stitches last Wednesday and the fight apparently will be postponed to June 28, said Marc Ratner, head of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
REAL ESTATE
June 16, 1985
When Franciscan Ceramics Inc. closed its famous ceramics plant last year, 280 employees lost their jobs. Among them was Peggy Spaulding, a designer who spent 30 years at the 45-acre facility at 2901 Los Feliz Blvd. Unlike a newspaper, where bylines and credit lines are used liberally, artists at places like Franciscan--the only U. S. facility of Wedgwood Ltd., Stoke-on-Trent, England--labored anonymously.
TRAVEL
June 13, 2004 | Rosemary McClure
Which came first, the moonshine or the jug? No matter, the clay jars and pitchers that North Carolina's folk potters once created to hold whiskey and to cook and store food have come a long way in the last 100 years. They still have utilitarian uses, but now many people call them art. And there's a hot market for them.
HOME & GARDEN
March 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
Thomas Minton set out a century ago to design fine china for the public and wound up founding a firm that found royal favor--which it retains to this day. Minton china today still offers the gloriously gilded, exquisitely painted pieces that enchanted both Queen Victoria, who called it "the most beautiful in the world," and her descendant, Elizabeth II. It is easy to understand why Victoria found Minton so appealing.
HOME & GARDEN
August 16, 1997 | RALPH and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The roll-top desk was an office favorite for decades beginning at the turn of the century. An office worker could close the desk by rolling down its top, a piece of canvas faced with strips of rounded wood. The canvas was set into the top much like a window shade. It could be opened or closed on the wooden side tracks. The simplest form is called a C-roll. Early roll-top desks were large and heavy and made of black walnut, cherry or mahogany. By 1900, most of them were made of oak.
HOME & GARDEN
February 10, 2001 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Figural containers have fascinated collectors for hundreds of years. There were 18th century perfume bottles shaped like women, 19th century whiskey jugs in the form of judges and politicians and 20th century lady-head vases. They are all in demand. Lady heads that sold for $5 to $15 in the 1980s now bring $100 to $1,000.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2007 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The food safety czar at the Food and Drug Administration performs one ritual before his twice-weekly teleconferences with reporters, who sometimes snarl their questions about tainted animal foods: He eats. "I have to be fueled up," says David Acheson, a medical doctor whose title -- bestowed this month -- is assistant commissioner for food protection. Acheson, a 4 1/2 -year FDA veteran, means to be honest and not ironic in sharing how he prepares for the sometimes contentious calls.
HOME & GARDEN
March 28, 1998 | TERRY KOVEL and RALPH KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first time a chest of drawers wasn't shaped like a simple box was in the late 19th century. The ratio of interior space to the amount of wood needed to enclose it is best if it is a cube. But against a wall, a deep chest took too much space in the center of the room. Designers altered the proportions to the shape most often seen today. Art nouveau designers felt economy was not important, and they favored strange rounded shapes for chests and desks.
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