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Stokely Carmichael

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1998
The news of the death of Kwame Toure (a.k.a. Stokely Carmichael) saddens me a great deal (Nov. 16). He has done a lot in helping African Americans to struggle for self-determination and self-definition as a people. I had the pleasure of meeting him on campus on one of his college speaking tours in 1982. He seemed out of step then, still talking about world (socialist) revolution. I was very critical of his views. Considering the leadership vacuum within the African American community today, I wonder if I would be so harsh with my criticism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Stokely Carmichael. Angela Davis. Huey P. Newton. Bobby Seale. Names to conjure with in recent American history, when the Black Power political movement was a force in the land, but names that no longer mean what they did back in the day. A Swedish filmmaker named Goran Hugo Olsson aims to change that with a singular documentary called "The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975. " It was Olsson who discovered reels of 16-millimeter interview footage of these significant individuals and others taken by Swedish television journalists, footage that had sat abandoned and forgotten in the network's archives.
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BOOKS
January 25, 2004 | David J. Garrow, David J. Garrow is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Bearing the Cross," a biography of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
Stokely CARMICHAEL became internationally famous at 25 when he launched the cry "Black Power" at a 1966 Mississippi civil rights rally. Two years later, when he moved to the West African country of Guinea to work for Pan-African revolution, his political relevance was already in full eclipse. Carmichael emerged as a significant member of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, soon after enduring his first civil rights jailing at 19.
OPINION
October 23, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Her mother crafted the name from the musical terms con dolce and con dolcezza , meaning "with sweetness" in Italian. Condoleezza Rice's life's work, though, has been about the hard stuff: Soviet specialist, Stanford University provost, Chevron board member, national security advisor and then secretary of State under President George W. Bush. Hers was one of the most public and controversial faces in that administration, for her justifications of the Iraq War and for the conduct of the war against terrorism.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kwame Toure, who as the fiery political activist named Stokely Carmichael was a seminal figure in the Black Power movement of the 1960s, died Sunday at the age of 57. He died of prostate cancer at his home in the West African nation of Guinea, where he had lived since 1969, said Sharon Sobukwe, a Philadelphia-based member of Toure's All-African People's Revolutionary Party. Toure came to public attention at a time of great upheaval in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997
A fund-raising dinner to help pay the medical expenses of Kwame Ture, known to a generation of activists by his former name Stokely Carmichael, will be held tonight at the Pan African Art Studio in Long Beach. Ture, suffering from inoperable cancer, has been living in Guinea, West Africa. He is the co-author, with Charles V. Hamilton, of the book "Black Power: The Politics of Black Liberation." He is credited with popularizing the phrase "black power."
OPINION
November 22, 1998 | St.CLAIR BOURNE, St.Clair Bourne is a screenwriter, producer and director. His film "Paul Robeson: Here I Stand" will air Feb. 24 on PBS
For many Americans in their mid-50s, especially those of African descent, Stokely Carmichael is remembered as a crucial part of the 1960s. He is seared in most people's minds as the "black power"-shouting civil rights firebrand during the Mississippi summer voter registration campaign of 1966. He scared whites and moderate blacks alike but earned the grudging respect EVEN of those who disagreed with him.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: Anger and Civil Rights Congratulations. The Times has hired a black-white girl to voice the fears of the right wing. In a well-written article in which she impresses us with her fancy words and misplaced quotes, Njeri shows once again that there is no fool like an educated fool.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | from Reuters
Former Black Panther Stokely Carmichael hit out at filmmaker Spike Lee and rained a barrage of abuse on other leading African-Americans in an interview to be published next week. Carmichael's remarks showed that, after 24 years in Guinea, he is still as bitter a critic of the United States as he was when spearheading the black power movement in the 1960s. And his targets are as likely to be black as white.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
The president of the black consciousness Azanian People's Organization, which has been strongly critical of American policies in southern Africa, said Tuesday that he is giving up his post to study in the United States. Saths Cooper, 36, who for 15 years has been one of South Africa's most prominent anti-apartheid activists and a leading advocate of black power, said the government has given him a passport after refusing since 1968 to allow him to travel abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
Mystery writers can be a dark lot. "When I was growing up, I was always interested in those books, ‘Women Who Kill,' " Megan Abbott, author of "Bury Me Deep," intoned as her audience laughed. She chuckled. "Strange kid." Across the UCLA campus Saturday, there were writerly confessions — and not just from the authors of noirish mystery tales — and political musings. Celebrities reflected on their lives, poets read from their works and a person or two could be found strolling the grounds in costume.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
Early Saturday evening, Providence, R.I.-based artist Mark Tribe orchestrated a reenactment of a 1971 speech by Chicano labor activist Cesar Chavez protesting the Vietnam War. On the South Lawn of Exposition Park, midway between the Natural History Museum and the Coliseum, a call went out for "organized and disciplined nonviolent action," aimed squarely at those "seeking [their] manhood in affluence and war. " Actor Ricardo Dominguez spoke from the podium to a crowd that numbered perhaps one-tenth of the 2,600 who had gathered in the park 37 years earlier.
BOOKS
January 25, 2004 | David J. Garrow, David J. Garrow is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Bearing the Cross," a biography of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
Stokely CARMICHAEL became internationally famous at 25 when he launched the cry "Black Power" at a 1966 Mississippi civil rights rally. Two years later, when he moved to the West African country of Guinea to work for Pan-African revolution, his political relevance was already in full eclipse. Carmichael emerged as a significant member of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, soon after enduring his first civil rights jailing at 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1998
The news of the death of Kwame Toure (a.k.a. Stokely Carmichael) saddens me a great deal (Nov. 16). He has done a lot in helping African Americans to struggle for self-determination and self-definition as a people. I had the pleasure of meeting him on campus on one of his college speaking tours in 1982. He seemed out of step then, still talking about world (socialist) revolution. I was very critical of his views. Considering the leadership vacuum within the African American community today, I wonder if I would be so harsh with my criticism.
OPINION
November 22, 1998 | St.CLAIR BOURNE, St.Clair Bourne is a screenwriter, producer and director. His film "Paul Robeson: Here I Stand" will air Feb. 24 on PBS
For many Americans in their mid-50s, especially those of African descent, Stokely Carmichael is remembered as a crucial part of the 1960s. He is seared in most people's minds as the "black power"-shouting civil rights firebrand during the Mississippi summer voter registration campaign of 1966. He scared whites and moderate blacks alike but earned the grudging respect EVEN of those who disagreed with him.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kwame Toure, who as the fiery political activist named Stokely Carmichael was a seminal figure in the Black Power movement of the 1960s, died Sunday at the age of 57. He died of prostate cancer at his home in the West African nation of Guinea, where he had lived since 1969, said Sharon Sobukwe, a Philadelphia-based member of Toure's All-African People's Revolutionary Party. Toure came to public attention at a time of great upheaval in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Stokely Carmichael. Angela Davis. Huey P. Newton. Bobby Seale. Names to conjure with in recent American history, when the Black Power political movement was a force in the land, but names that no longer mean what they did back in the day. A Swedish filmmaker named Goran Hugo Olsson aims to change that with a singular documentary called "The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975. " It was Olsson who discovered reels of 16-millimeter interview footage of these significant individuals and others taken by Swedish television journalists, footage that had sat abandoned and forgotten in the network's archives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times
Mystery writers can be a dark lot. "When I was growing up, I was always interested in those books, ‘Women Who Kill,' " Megan Abbott, author of "Bury Me Deep," intoned as her audience laughed. She chuckled. "Strange kid." Across the UCLA campus Saturday, there were writerly confessions — and not just from the authors of noirish mystery tales — and political musings. Celebrities reflected on their lives, poets read from their works and a person or two could be found strolling the grounds in costume.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997
A fund-raising dinner to help pay the medical expenses of Kwame Ture, known to a generation of activists by his former name Stokely Carmichael, will be held tonight at the Pan African Art Studio in Long Beach. Ture, suffering from inoperable cancer, has been living in Guinea, West Africa. He is the co-author, with Charles V. Hamilton, of the book "Black Power: The Politics of Black Liberation." He is credited with popularizing the phrase "black power."
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | JOHN RICE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His hair is going gray and his body is fighting cancer. But when Kwame Ture, once widely in the news as black activist Stokely Carmichael, reaches across his hospital bed for the telephone, he answers it as always: "Ready for revolution." A central figure in the United States' black power movement of the 1960s and a crusader for pan-Africanism since, Ture came to Cuba in April for treatment of prostate cancer discovered in January.
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