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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Foreign auteurs tend to enjoy a good metaphoric image or three. And few like them more than Chan-wook Park, the South Korean filmmaker behind violent cult hits such as "Oldboy. " In "Stoker," Park's English-language debut starring Nicole Kidman that opened in Los Angeles last weekend, there are a number of memorable images. They're all there for a reason. "Stoker" centers on the loner India (Mia Wasikowska), her aloof and at times rivalrous mother (Kidman) and India's affectionate but mysterious uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Quartet TWC/Anchor Bay, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 Available on VOD beginning Tuesday Dustin Hoffman makes his directorial debut with this heartwarming dramedy, an adaptation of Ronald Harwood's play about a retirement home for accomplished musicians. Maggie Smith plays a difficult diva who might be able to help save the home if she can get over her pride and perform at a benefit concert with her old troupe (played by Tom Courtenay, Billy Connolly and Pauline Collins). Plotwise, "Quartet" is pretty predictable and strikes a tone that ranges from overly staid to overly kooky, similar to Smith's 2012 surprise hit "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
In a high-tech bungalow on a back corner of the 20th Century Fox lot, the South Korean auteur Chan-wook Park is chiseling his opus as the clock ticks toward 9 p.m. Park, the toast of Asian cinema and hero to hordes of genre-film enthusiasts, is editing "Stoker," a coming-of-age Gothic thriller starring Mia Wasikowska and Nicole Kidman. It's his first film in the U.S. and first in English. For hard-core fans of the director's blood-spattered Korean work - including "Oldboy," the 2004 Cannes Grand Prix winner being remade by Spike Lee - his arrival on the shores might be compared, with less exaggeration than you may think, to the landing of the Beatles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Gordon Stoker, the lead tenor in the Jordanaires vocal group that backed Elvis Presley, died Wednesday at his home in Brentwood, Tenn., after a lengthy illness, his son, Alan, told the Associated Press. He was 88. Stoker joined the Jordanaires in 1950, two years after they formed in Missouri. He originally played piano for the group. They caught the attention of Presley in the mid-1950s when they performed with Eddy Arnold at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. When Presley burst onto the national scene in 1956 on Steve Allen's TV show, Stoker and the Jordanaires were with him. They also sang on the original New York RCA studios recordings of "Hound Dog," "Don't Be Cruel" and other hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Quartet TWC/Anchor Bay, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 Available on VOD beginning Tuesday Dustin Hoffman makes his directorial debut with this heartwarming dramedy, an adaptation of Ronald Harwood's play about a retirement home for accomplished musicians. Maggie Smith plays a difficult diva who might be able to help save the home if she can get over her pride and perform at a benefit concert with her old troupe (played by Tom Courtenay, Billy Connolly and Pauline Collins). Plotwise, "Quartet" is pretty predictable and strikes a tone that ranges from overly staid to overly kooky, similar to Smith's 2012 surprise hit "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992
Having been a publicist himself--for actor Sir Henry Irving--Bram (Abraham) Stoker must be chuckling in his bier over all the current coverage of Dracula. AL HIX Hollywood
NEWS
October 28, 1996 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not many people on the Skidmore College campus know the dean of faculty's bloody secret. Phyllis Roth, 51, has an enduring passion for one of the most suspenseful novels ever penned--Bram Stoker's "Dracula." In the early 1980s, Roth, then an English professor at the school in upstate New York, wrote a critical biography of Stoker that is still widely recognized--so much so that when she went to Romania last year for the first World Dracula Congress she, too, was widely recognized.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | Kevin Thomas
This enjoyable 1992 release might be more aptly titled "Francis Coppola's Dracula." The director brings to the umpteenth retelling of Stoker's 1897 novel the grand operatic style of his "Godfather" movies plus considerable sensuality and an affectionate tongue-in-cheek play to the vampire tale. Gary Oldman is suitably world-weary as Dracula, and Winona Ryder (pictured, with Keanu Reeves as her suitor) is his winsome victim.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The final installment in Richard Linklater's “Before” trilogy, Chan-wook Park's English-language debut and Ashton Kutcher's Steve Jobs portrayal all will be unveiled at Sundance -- and did we mention documentaries about Jeremy Lin and Dick Cheney? Festival organizers on Monday announced this year's narrative and documentary premieres, a total of 29 films that will play out of competition as they make their world premieres. Highlights on the narrative list include Linklater's “Before Midnight,” in which Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy reprise their signature lovelorn roles as Jesse and Celine, this time as angsty 40-somethings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Foreign auteurs tend to enjoy a good metaphoric image or three. And few like them more than Chan-wook Park, the South Korean filmmaker behind violent cult hits such as "Oldboy. " In "Stoker," Park's English-language debut starring Nicole Kidman that opened in Los Angeles last weekend, there are a number of memorable images. They're all there for a reason. "Stoker" centers on the loner India (Mia Wasikowska), her aloof and at times rivalrous mother (Kidman) and India's affectionate but mysterious uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
What would happen if a psychopath fell for a sociopath? The short answer in "Stoker" is people die. The longer answer in the new thriller from South Korean director Park Chan-Wook is a bizarrely perverse, beautifully rendered mystery that you may or may not care to solve. It has fine performances from Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode and Nicole Kidman - we'll leave you guessing who's the more twisted of that trio. And an out-of-nowhere script from rising British-born, Brooklyn-raised actor Wentworth Miller, best known for starring in the edgy TV drama series "Prison Break.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
In a high-tech bungalow on a back corner of the 20th Century Fox lot, the South Korean auteur Chan-wook Park is chiseling his opus as the clock ticks toward 9 p.m. Park, the toast of Asian cinema and hero to hordes of genre-film enthusiasts, is editing "Stoker," a coming-of-age Gothic thriller starring Mia Wasikowska and Nicole Kidman. It's his first film in the U.S. and first in English. For hard-core fans of the director's blood-spattered Korean work - including "Oldboy," the 2004 Cannes Grand Prix winner being remade by Spike Lee - his arrival on the shores might be compared, with less exaggeration than you may think, to the landing of the Beatles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Nicole Kidman has been pushing in some unusual directions lately. But that adventurousness takes on an entirely new dimension in Chan-wook Park's “Stoker,” a movie focusing on an unstable woman who lives in a Gothic house (Kidman), her moody daughter (Mia Wasikowska) and her mysterious brother in-law (Matthew Goode), who shows up after her husband passes away. Kidman plays Evie, a woman who is hardly an ideal mother and may be overlooking or even enabling some pretty macabre behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The final installment in Richard Linklater's “Before” trilogy, Chan-wook Park's English-language debut and Ashton Kutcher's Steve Jobs portrayal all will be unveiled at Sundance -- and did we mention documentaries about Jeremy Lin and Dick Cheney? Festival organizers on Monday announced this year's narrative and documentary premieres, a total of 29 films that will play out of competition as they make their world premieres. Highlights on the narrative list include Linklater's “Before Midnight,” in which Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy reprise their signature lovelorn roles as Jesse and Celine, this time as angsty 40-somethings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Time has not diminished the warm memories of those who worked on Francis Ford Coppola's horror-romance "Bram Stoker's Dracula. " "He steered the ship," said Michele Burke, who won an Oscar for her makeup and hair design, about her collaboration with the director most widely known for "The Godfather" trilogy. "It was like being in rarefied air in his company. " Burke and several members of the crew, who won Oscars for their evocative work on "Dracula" - makeup artists Greg Cannom and Matthew W. Mungle and special effects sound editors Tom C. McCarthy and David E. Stone - will discuss the production Thursday evening at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science's Samuel Goldwyn Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The winter isn't necessarily known for new works from acclaimed Asian auteurs. But Fox Searchlight and Park Chan-wook will seek to change that when they bring out "Stoker" just about eight weeks into the new year. The studio said Tuesday it had dated Park's much-anticipated film for March 1, seeking to capitalize on the season's overlapping audience for both genre movies and longer-running prestige movies. "Stoker," a coming-of-age tale from a man who counts "Oldboy" and "Thirst" among his previous works, is believed to be a hybrid of sorts, combining genre and art-house elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
When filmmaker Tony Scott took his own life Sunday, he left behind a long resume of Hollywood hits. But film fans will get a chance to watch his legacy continue on the big screen with a pair of new movies next year. Scott was a producer on "Out of the Furnace," a dark thriller starring Christian Bale that recently wrapped production. Though a person involved with the movie who asked not to be identified said Scott was not involved in the day-to-day production of the film, he was overseeing it as a partner in Scott Free Productions, the company he ran with his brother Ridley Scott, which had a producer on set. The movie, which is set to be released by Relativity Media next year, has been a hot project in Hollywood ever since it was sold as "The Low Dweller" four years ago. It centers on a fugitive with a dark past on the run in an Indiana town, and has attracted comparisons to "No Country for Old Men. " Leonardo DiCaprio's company Appian Way is also producing it. (Scott's next movie as a director, incidentally, was set to be "Top Gun 2," a long-awaited sequel to the 1986 classic that would have reteamed him with star Tom Cruise and producer Jerry Bruckheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The winter isn't necessarily known for new works from acclaimed Asian auteurs. But Fox Searchlight and Park Chan-wook will seek to change that when they bring out "Stoker" just about eight weeks into the new year. The studio said Tuesday it had dated Park's much-anticipated film for March 1, seeking to capitalize on the season's overlapping audience for both genre movies and longer-running prestige movies. "Stoker," a coming-of-age tale from a man who counts "Oldboy" and "Thirst" among his previous works, is believed to be a hybrid of sorts, combining genre and art-house elements.
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