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Stolen Cellphones

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BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The largest wireless carriers are banding together with regulators and law enforcment officials to launch an effort to make stolen cellphones and other mobile devices as useless as an empty wallet. The goal is to cut down on increasing thefts of smartphones by making them less appealing to criminals. AT&T Inc., Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA and Sprint Nextel Corp. said Tuesday they will create a central database to track stolen devices and prevent them from being reactivated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
The deaths of Ying Wu and Ming Qu, two USC graduate students from China, puzzled investigators. The two had been fatally shot while sitting in Qu's parked BMW on a rainy April night in 2012, and authorities struggled to find a motive. Both, however, were missing their phones. In the end, prosecutors said, it was Wu's stolen black iPhone that led investigators to the suspected shooters. On Monday, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled that Bryan Barnes, 21, and Javier Bolden, 20, will stand trial for the students' deaths.
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BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Moscow authorities are developing a system to track mobile devices in transit stations to help them quickly nab cellphone thieves, according to a report in a Russian newspaper. The program, which has raised numerous privacy concerns, highlights the growing focus on finding ways to curb the rise in cellphone thefts. But San Francisco Dist. Atty. George Gascon, a leading advocate for more anti-theft features on smartphones, said not to expect the Russian-style surveillance to come to his city anytime soon.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Moscow authorities are developing a system to track mobile devices in transit stations to help them quickly nab cellphone thieves, according to a report in a Russian newspaper. The program, which has raised numerous privacy concerns, highlights the growing focus on finding ways to curb the rise in cellphone thefts. But San Francisco Dist. Atty. George Gascon, a leading advocate for more anti-theft features on smartphones, said not to expect the Russian-style surveillance to come to his city anytime soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
The deaths of Ying Wu and Ming Qu, two USC graduate students from China, puzzled investigators. The two had been fatally shot while sitting in Qu's parked BMW on a rainy April night in 2012, and authorities struggled to find a motive. Both, however, were missing their phones. In the end, prosecutors said, it was Wu's stolen black iPhone that led investigators to the suspected shooters. On Monday, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled that Bryan Barnes, 21, and Javier Bolden, 20, will stand trial for the students' deaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
"The Blossoming of Maximo Oliveros" is one of the finest Filipino films, shimmering with folkloric charm without softening its view of the harshness and injustice of a life of poverty. Sophisticated in its ease and spontaneity, it was directed with clarity and rigor by Auraeus Solito from Michiiko Yamamoto's acutely perceptive script. There's so much color and vitality on Gulpit Street in the Sampaloc neighborhood of Manila, it's as inviting as Olvera Street.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest wireless carriers are banding together with regulators and law enforcement officials to launch an effort to make stolen cellphones and other mobile devices as useless as an empty wallet. The goal is to cut down on increasing thefts of smartphones by making them less appealing to criminals. AT&T Inc., Verizon Wireless,T-Mobile USA andSprint Nextel Corp. said Tuesday they will create a central database to track stolen devices and prevent them from being reactivated.
WORLD
February 21, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. citizen who shot to death two motorcyclists in the eastern city of Lahore last month works with the CIA, Pakistani and U.S. officials said Monday ? a revelation that could further aggravate anti-American sentiment in the nuclear-armed nation and complicate Washington's efforts to secure his release. Pakistani authorities said they learned of Raymond Davis' links to the CIA after his arrest on charges that he murdered two Pakistani men he said were trying to rob him at gunpoint, according to a senior Pakistani intelligence official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to publicly discuss the case.
WORLD
February 16, 2011 | Alex Rodriguez
Inspired by the popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, Pakistani college student Gulraiz Iqbal is itching for a reason to take his disdain for President Asif Ali Zardari's government to the streets. If Pakistani authorities grant diplomatic immunity and release Raymond Davis, the U.S. Embassy employee accused of murder in the deaths of two Pakistani men in Lahore, Iqbal will have the cause he craves. "We would organize students in Lahore and across the country, and create a movement that would turn into a revolution," said Iqbal, 22, a small, wiry man who is a leader of the Lahore student wing of an opposition party, Movement for Justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
WHEN my son was a bit younger than he is now, he was looked after by a Salvadoran nanny, whose young daughter attended school with our boy. In the late afternoon, the two children would sit in the kitchen doing their homework together. When the nanny spoke to them it was invariably in Spanish, and they would reply in the normative form of that language. If I happened by and said something to them, it usually was in English, and they'd answer similarly.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The largest wireless carriers are banding together with regulators and law enforcment officials to launch an effort to make stolen cellphones and other mobile devices as useless as an empty wallet. The goal is to cut down on increasing thefts of smartphones by making them less appealing to criminals. AT&T Inc., Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA and Sprint Nextel Corp. said Tuesday they will create a central database to track stolen devices and prevent them from being reactivated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2006 | Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Last Christmas, iPod sales drove a record-breaking season for online merchants. Now, the music player is contributing to an unexpected rise in robberies across Los Angeles. Robberies of iPods, top-of-the-line cellphones and other gear are up 34% so far this year, accounting for about 1,700 of the city's 8,000 total robberies.
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