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Stolen Documents

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year employee of the Immigration and Naturalization Service pleaded guilty Monday to charges of accepting a bribe and selling stolen immigration documents. Maria Chica, 52, of Los Angeles admitted stealing 22 permanent resident cards, which she sold for $2,000 to a person who turned out to be a government informant. She also acknowledged selling an INS work permit to the informant for $1,500. Assistant U.S. Atty.
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NATIONAL
February 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Documents dating from the Civil War and others to and from Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt are among hundreds of stolen documents sold online that EBay is agreeing to buy back and return to New York's archives, a state official in Albany said. The online auction giant has no liability in the sale of the stolen artifacts, but it agreed voluntarily to offer buyers the amount that they paid, according to the official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because not all details of the investigation have been announced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 400 students who recently completed the ACT college entrance exam at El Camino Real High School are waiting to hear if they will need to retake the three-hour test after a copy of the test was stolen. Despite strict security measures, some test booklets sent to the Woodland Hills school were missing Saturday--the day of the test, said Ken Gullette, spokesman for ACT Inc., which owns the test that is taken by 1.8 million students nationwide each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
Henry Bartholomew Cox, a historian and lawyer who helped recover more than $250,000 worth of documents stolen from the Thomas A. Edison historical site, died April 8 at his home in Fort Washington, Md. He was 69 and had Alzheimer's disease. Cox, an appraiser and collector who owned several early phonographs made by Edison, was alerted in 1984 by a North Carolina dealer that a California professor was willing to sell several rare documents signed by the famous inventor.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Documents dating from the Civil War and others to and from Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt are among hundreds of stolen documents sold online that EBay is agreeing to buy back and return to New York's archives, a state official in Albany said. The online auction giant has no liability in the sale of the stolen artifacts, but it agreed voluntarily to offer buyers the amount that they paid, according to the official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because not all details of the investigation have been announced.
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Scholar Charles Merrill Mount was convicted Monday of transporting stolen historic documents, including letters from Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill, that belonged to the National Archives and the Library of Congress. Mount, 59, a Brooklyn native who sports the manners and accent of a British gentleman, was charged with interstate transportation of stolen goods. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine when sentenced on May 23.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Charles Merrill Mount, describing himself as "a perfectly normal Edwardian gentleman," said Thursday that he did not steal rare letters and other government and historic documents found in his possession and that he expects the "hysteria" over his recent arrests to subside once he gets the chance to tell his side of the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
Henry Bartholomew Cox, a historian and lawyer who helped recover more than $250,000 worth of documents stolen from the Thomas A. Edison historical site, died April 8 at his home in Fort Washington, Md. He was 69 and had Alzheimer's disease. Cox, an appraiser and collector who owned several early phonographs made by Edison, was alerted in 1984 by a North Carolina dealer that a California professor was willing to sell several rare documents signed by the famous inventor.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Three people have been arrested and charged with stealing confidential information about drink recipes from Coca-Cola Co. and trying to sell it to rival PepsiCo Inc., federal prosecutors said Wednesday. The suspects include an executive administrative assistant at Atlanta-based Coke, Joya Williams, who is accused of stuffing documents and a new Coca-Cola product into a personal bag. Williams, 41, of Norcross, Ga.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Court Dismisses Suit Against Law Firms: Westinghouse, facing a dozen suits over alleged defects in nuclear plant steam generators, had contended that three law firms used stolen documents to instigate the suits. The firms are Los Angeles-based Chase, Rotchford, Drukker & Bogust plus Newman & Holtzinger of Washington and Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge of Washington.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Three people have been arrested and charged with stealing confidential information about drink recipes from Coca-Cola Co. and trying to sell it to rival PepsiCo Inc., federal prosecutors said Wednesday. The suspects include an executive administrative assistant at Atlanta-based Coke, Joya Williams, who is accused of stuffing documents and a new Coca-Cola product into a personal bag. Williams, 41, of Norcross, Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year employee of the Immigration and Naturalization Service pleaded guilty Monday to charges of accepting a bribe and selling stolen immigration documents. Maria Chica, 52, of Los Angeles admitted stealing 22 permanent resident cards, which she sold for $2,000 to a person who turned out to be a government informant. She also acknowledged selling an INS work permit to the informant for $1,500. Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 400 students who recently completed the ACT college entrance exam at El Camino Real High School are waiting to hear if they will need to retake the three-hour test after a copy of the test was stolen. Despite strict security measures, some test booklets sent to the Woodland Hills school were missing Saturday--the day of the test, said Ken Gullette, spokesman for ACT Inc., which owns the test that is taken by 1.8 million students nationwide each year.
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Scholar Charles Merrill Mount was convicted Monday of transporting stolen historic documents, including letters from Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill, that belonged to the National Archives and the Library of Congress. Mount, 59, a Brooklyn native who sports the manners and accent of a British gentleman, was charged with interstate transportation of stolen goods. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine when sentenced on May 23.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Charles Merrill Mount, describing himself as "a perfectly normal Edwardian gentleman," said Thursday that he did not steal rare letters and other government and historic documents found in his possession and that he expects the "hysteria" over his recent arrests to subside once he gets the chance to tell his side of the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1997
Here are the ethics questions recently posed to the reporters and photographers of the Ventura County Edition of The Times. We would like to know what you would do if these decisions were up to you. We also invite you to suggest other situations that involve ethical choices. Please send your response to Ethics Quiz, Los Angeles Times, 93 S. Chestnut St., Ventura, CA 93001. 1. An elderly man on Social Security earns extra money as a dog walker.
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