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Stomach Flu

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SCIENCE
May 6, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The drug that Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.) said he took to treat an inflamed stomach is commonly used to control the nausea from prescription painkillers and rarely used for stomach ailments, experts said Friday. Phenergan is also sometimes used by drug abusers to enhance their highs from opium-derived painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, said Dr. Bankole Johnson, an addiction expert at the University of Virginia.
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SPORTS
December 13, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
VS. PHOENIX When: 7 p.m. Where: Honda Center. On the air: TV: Prime Ticket; Radio: 830. Records: Ducks 8-16-5, Coyotes 15-11-3 Update: The always-entertaining Lubomir Visnovsky could provide a big boost to the Ducks' defense, and, in particular, the power play. Visnovsky has been out of the lineup since suffering a broken finger on his right hand on Nov. 11. "I am so excited for tomorrow," he said Tuesday after practice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A nagging stomach ailment that leaves sufferers tired, feverish and nauseated is striking many Orange County schoolchildren, who are passing it on to their parents and others, private and public school nurses said Wednesday. Children returning to school probably have spread the virus, school nurses said. "We are seeing a lot of kids in the health office with upset stomachs, headaches, fevers and some vomiting," said Joey Van Camp, coordinating nurse for the Westminster School District.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The fever that struck Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki didn't keep him from scoring the game-winning basket in Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Miami Heat, though it may have some fans worrying how he'll fare in Game 5. But hey, maybe that weakness could become a key offensive tool. It might sound far-fetched, but the Mavericks would not be the first to pass on a bad bug to the opposing team. Back in 1998, Duke University's football team, the Blue Devils, lost to the favored Florida State Seminoles -- but not before they infected the Seminoles with a nasty case of the stomach flu, as described by a study published in 2000 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a premonition of sorts, said Donna Hilton, that moved her to give her teen-age daughter a Christmas gift in November. "I bought her a real nice watch for Christmas. But for some reason I couldn't wait to give it to her. So, I gave it to her a month early. She needed a nice watch. If she was going to go to college next year, she might as well have a nice watch," Hilton said.
SPORTS
December 5, 2007 | Mike Bresnahan, Times Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS -- Maybe the Lakers' issues aren't that bad. They suited up only one center, their top player was battling stomach flu, and they had to walk to the game in blizzard conditions because their bus never arrived, but they still beat the hapless Minnesota Timberwolves, 116-95, Tuesday in an eerily empty Target Center. Teams cruising through Minnesota this season will leave with a victory much more often than not.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A small college is shutting down for several days after 100 students and staff members were sickened by a virus that causes a type of stomach flu. Students and faculty have been afflicted with severe nausea and vomiting at Babson College in Wellesley, west of Boston. State Department of Public Health spokesman Tom Lyons says the norovirus is "miserable" but isn't life-threatening. He says most people get better after a few days. The college is expected to be closed until at least Wednesday while campus buildings are cleaned.
SPORTS
December 13, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
VS. PHOENIX When: 7 p.m. Where: Honda Center. On the air: TV: Prime Ticket; Radio: 830. Records: Ducks 8-16-5, Coyotes 15-11-3 Update: The always-entertaining Lubomir Visnovsky could provide a big boost to the Ducks' defense, and, in particular, the power play. Visnovsky has been out of the lineup since suffering a broken finger on his right hand on Nov. 11. "I am so excited for tomorrow," he said Tuesday after practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1998 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People worried that they could still come down with the flu or a nasty cold this season can rest easy. Sort of. The general consensus in clinics and doctors' offices around the county is that the worst is over. Maybe. "We'll still see flu through April," county epidemiologist Marilyn Billimek said Wednesday. But "I think we can say the flu season is at a slow roll right now."
SPORTS
August 29, 1996 | EARL GUSTKEY
For the Trojans on Wednesday, it wasn't a case of how many players had stomach flu, it was more a question of who didn't. Most of the players were complaining of jumpy stomachs during a short, no-contact practice. Even the coach was ailing. John Robinson went home early Tuesday, he said, after nearly passing out at a team meeting. * Quarterback Brad Otton didn't throw in practice. He pulled a shoulder muscle against Penn State last Sunday and trainers told him to rest it until today.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Stomach illnesses peak in winter -- sometimes spread from person to person, sometimes spread via food handled by a sick person. The reason doesn’t really matter, though, when you feel horrible. And, unlike the flu, there's no vaccine you can take to prevent an infection. Beyond campylobacter, salmonella and E. coli (all bacteriums), one of the most common culprits in food-borne illnesses is norovirus, also known as viral gastroenteritis. It's more commonly called the stomach flu -- though it's not remotely related to the flu. This story from the Allentown Morning Call reports the toll such viruses are taking in one state: "In the first three months of this year, nursing homes in Pennsylvania reported 4,040 norovirus cases — nearly twice as many as those reported in all the nine prior months combined.
SPORTS
September 6, 2010 | By Dylan Hernandez
The seventh inning of a 4-2 defeat to the San Diego Padres on Monday was a microcosm of the increasingly dismal season for the Dodgers. With the Dodgers trailing by a run that inning, Andre Ethier faced Mike Adams with runners on first and second. The slumping All-Star struck out. The threat was over. In the bottom half of the inning, another out-of-form All-Star, former closer Jonathan Broxton, served up a leadoff double to pinch-hitter Aaron Cunningham. The reserve outfielder later scored on a sacrifice fly by David Eckstein to hand the Dodgers' stalled offense a two-run deficit.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A small college is shutting down for several days after 100 students and staff members were sickened by a virus that causes a type of stomach flu. Students and faculty have been afflicted with severe nausea and vomiting at Babson College in Wellesley, west of Boston. State Department of Public Health spokesman Tom Lyons says the norovirus is "miserable" but isn't life-threatening. He says most people get better after a few days. The college is expected to be closed until at least Wednesday while campus buildings are cleaned.
SPORTS
December 5, 2007 | Mike Bresnahan, Times Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS -- Maybe the Lakers' issues aren't that bad. They suited up only one center, their top player was battling stomach flu, and they had to walk to the game in blizzard conditions because their bus never arrived, but they still beat the hapless Minnesota Timberwolves, 116-95, Tuesday in an eerily empty Target Center. Teams cruising through Minnesota this season will leave with a victory much more often than not.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The drug that Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.) said he took to treat an inflamed stomach is commonly used to control the nausea from prescription painkillers and rarely used for stomach ailments, experts said Friday. Phenergan is also sometimes used by drug abusers to enhance their highs from opium-derived painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, said Dr. Bankole Johnson, an addiction expert at the University of Virginia.
SPORTS
July 7, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The Angels lost the game, the least of their concerns on a bizarre day at the ballpark. Their shortstop left the game because of whiplash and left the clubhouse wearing a sling on his right arm. Their right fielder spent part of the day in the hospital and found out he had kidney stones. Their catcher survived an arguably unsportsmanlike collision, one so jarring that the guy who ran out of his way to run into him separated his shoulder. The Angels lost the game.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The fever that struck Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki didn't keep him from scoring the game-winning basket in Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Miami Heat, though it may have some fans worrying how he'll fare in Game 5. But hey, maybe that weakness could become a key offensive tool. It might sound far-fetched, but the Mavericks would not be the first to pass on a bad bug to the opposing team. Back in 1998, Duke University's football team, the Blue Devils, lost to the favored Florida State Seminoles -- but not before they infected the Seminoles with a nasty case of the stomach flu, as described by a study published in 2000 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1986
Some Stueffe's raw milk products were recalled Friday in Orange County because routine tests showed that they might be contaminated with a bacteria that causes serious stomach disorders, the director of the county Health Care Agency said. Director Robert E. Merryman said his agency was asked by the state health department to recall from grocers' shelves certain Stueffe's products. Stueffe's is produced by the Altadena Dairy Co. of Los Angeles County, Merryman said.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | JUSTIN GLANVILLE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There's no such thing as stomach flu. And no, you shouldn't starve a fever. With winter in full swing, Americans are sniffling and sneezing by the millions, falling prey to flu, colds, strep throat and other common illnesses of the season. Yet most know little about what is making them sick or how best to treat their illnesses. "People have a real misunderstanding about what causes their symptoms," says Dr. Jim Martin of San Antonio, president-elect of the American Academy of Family Physicians.
HEALTH
May 24, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
"Upset" doesn't begin to cover it. Your stomach's doing flip-flops--and not because you've just met the person of your dreams. Vomiting and diarrhea can make you miserable. Why are your stomach and bowels reacting so strongly? It's probably because of some irritant, such as viral stomach flu, something you ate or certain medications. The list goes on. Whatever the cause, vomiting and diarrhea are two ways your body can remove the problem from your system.
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