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Stone Roses Music Group

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June 17, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN
As four members of the Stone Roses walked around a corner and onto Portland Street, one of the city's main downtown roads, a group of perhaps 100 teen-agers began screaming. But the screams weren't for the Roses. The Roses may be the toast of British rock, but they passed almost unnoticed as the youngsters--mostly 10 to 14--waited across the street for another group to come out of a hotel: New Kids on the Block.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN
After establishing themselves in 1989 as the most significant British rock arrival since Jesus & Mary Chain in the mid-'80s, the Stone Roses--led by singer Ian Brown and guitarist John Squire--were a legitimate pick to succeed in 1990 and 1991. The Manchester quartet's debut album was an appealing blend of youthful irreverence, songwriting craft and contemporary dance-funk strains. But the band got involved in a dispute with its British record company and never got around to releasing the second album or touring the U.S. Meanwhile, other English outfits--including Jesus Jones, EMF and Charlatans U.K.--scored here with variations of the Stone Roses sound.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN
After establishing themselves in 1989 as the most significant British rock arrival since Jesus & Mary Chain in the mid-'80s, the Stone Roses--led by singer Ian Brown and guitarist John Squire--were a legitimate pick to succeed in 1990 and 1991. The Manchester quartet's debut album was an appealing blend of youthful irreverence, songwriting craft and contemporary dance-funk strains. But the band got involved in a dispute with its British record company and never got around to releasing the second album or touring the U.S. Meanwhile, other English outfits--including Jesus Jones, EMF and Charlatans U.K.--scored here with variations of the Stone Roses sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN
As four members of the Stone Roses walked around a corner and onto Portland Street, one of the city's main downtown roads, a group of perhaps 100 teen-agers began screaming. But the screams weren't for the Roses. The Roses may be the toast of British rock, but they passed almost unnoticed as the youngsters--mostly 10 to 14--waited across the street for another group to come out of a hotel: New Kids on the Block.
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