Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStonehenge
IN THE NEWS

Stonehenge

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
June 21, 2010 | From Reuters
Here are some key facts about Stonehenge: WHAT IS IT AND WHERE? -- Stonehenge is an archaeological site built in prehistoric times. This monumental circular setting of towering megaliths, surrounded by an earthwork, is located on Salisbury Plain, west of London. -- A World Heritage site spread over 2,600 hectares of land, the stone circle is surrounded by a landscape comprising more than 350 burial mounds. They include 10 Neolithic long barrows, the rest are Bronze Age round barrows.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The summer solstice has arrived, and Google has marked the occasion with an animated doodle of ocean swimmers leisurely lifted by waves.  Meanwhile, scientific types will pause to appreciate the phenomenon of the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. And those with a little romance in their souls will look to the ancient sites where sun and stones align and perhaps get a few goosebumps. Stonehenge, for example, remains a modern-day mystery. The circle of standing stones drew a mixed crowd of 20,000 people on Friday.  How was Stonehenge built, and why?
Advertisement
SCIENCE
October 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
British archaeologists have found the remains of a massive stone henge, or ceremonial circle, that was part of the ancient and celebrated Stonehenge complex, a find that is shedding new light on how the monument was built and its religious uses. The new henge, called Bluestonehenge because it was built with blue Preseli dolerite mined more than 150 miles away in Wales, was on the banks of the River Avon, where ancient pilgrims carrying the ashes of their dead relatives began the journey from the river to Stonehenge, nearly two miles away.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2011 | By Jenny Deam, Los Angeles Times
In the still of a cold November evening, a small gathering of pagans, led by two witches, begins preparations for the coming winter solstice. But these are not just any pagans, and this is not just any setting. They are future officers of the United States Air Force practicing their faith in the basement of the Air Force Academy's cadet chapel. Their ranks are slim. According to the academy's enrollment records, only three of 4,300 cadets identified themselves as pagans, followers of an ancient religion that generally does not worship a single god and considers all things in nature interconnected.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
For the first time in a decade, Druids and other groups gathered within the encircling rocks of Stonehenge at dawn to celebrate the summer solstice. About 100 people, including members of six Druid groups, held ceremonies at the 5,000-year-old monument in southwest England. In one ceremony, Druids in white robes formed a circle in the center of the stone circle, striking a Tibetan gong to mark the dawn of the year's longest day.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of drum-beating Druids and a strong police presence are expected to converge on Stonehenge for the summer solstice this evening when public access will be allowed at the prehistoric landmark for the first time in 16 years, according to English Heritage, which oversees the famous circle of huge stones. Regular public access to the landmark on Salisbury Plain in southern England had been banned to prevent damage.
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Druids, modern-day adherents to the ancient Celtic religion, canceled their summer solstice ritual at Stonehenge because of a confrontation between police and young people near the monument earlier this month. The National Trust, which controls land around the monument, had appealed to the Druids to observe a ban on an annual festival at the site.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | From Times wire services
Police today arrested at least 250 hippies who they said tried to enter the grounds of the 4,000-year-old Stonehenge monument before dawn to celebrate the summer solstice. Six people managed to scale a fence on the perimeter of the famed archeological site before they were detained, and one of them shouted to reporters, "Free the stones! Free the people!"
SCIENCE
May 20, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 4,000-year-old grave found near Stonehenge contains the remains of an archer and a trove of artifacts that make it one of the richest early Bronze Age sites in Europe, archeologists said. "It's a fantastically important discovery both for the number of artifacts found in that grave and the range of artifacts. It's absolutely unique," said Gillian Varndell, a curator of the British Museum's prehistory department.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of British hippies fought a pre-dawn battle with police who stopped them from marching on Stonehenge on Tuesday to celebrate sunrise on the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. Police said a crowd of 4,000 people, many with painted faces, hurled steel barriers and bottles at a ring of 1,000 officers guarding approaches to the Bronze Age stone circle on Salisbury plain.
TRAVEL
November 6, 2011 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
St. Cornelius, known as Cornély in France, opens his arms in blessing from a niche above the old stone church in Carnac. Legend has it that he was persecuted by Rome for his opposition to animal sacrifice and chased by soldiers all the way to the Brittany coast. Trapped, he turned around and changed them into 3,000 rough-hewn stones that still stand in military rows on a chain of fields just north of here. There are other hypotheses about the Carnac boulders, carbon dated to 4000 to 2000 BC. They mark one of Caesar's camps during the Gallic Wars from 58 to 50 BC. Or they were snake worship sites for ancient Celts whose territory included parts of England and Ireland as well as Brittany.
NEWS
March 1, 2011
How do you make prehistoric megaliths look even more ominous? Wait for menacing clouds to loom over and capture the scene in black and white. It worked for Times reader "photomarc," who shot this moody photo of England's Stonehenge. "[On] our last trip to England, my wife and I were caught in some nasty weather," says the photographer. "I did take this shot before hurrying back to the car!" The mysterious ruins were built approximately 5,000 years ago about eight miles north of Salisbury, England.
WORLD
June 21, 2010 | From Reuters
Here are some key facts about Stonehenge: WHAT IS IT AND WHERE? -- Stonehenge is an archaeological site built in prehistoric times. This monumental circular setting of towering megaliths, surrounded by an earthwork, is located on Salisbury Plain, west of London. -- A World Heritage site spread over 2,600 hectares of land, the stone circle is surrounded by a landscape comprising more than 350 burial mounds. They include 10 Neolithic long barrows, the rest are Bronze Age round barrows.
SCIENCE
October 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
British archaeologists have found the remains of a massive stone henge, or ceremonial circle, that was part of the ancient and celebrated Stonehenge complex, a find that is shedding new light on how the monument was built and its religious uses. The new henge, called Bluestonehenge because it was built with blue Preseli dolerite mined more than 150 miles away in Wales, was on the banks of the River Avon, where ancient pilgrims carrying the ashes of their dead relatives began the journey from the river to Stonehenge, nearly two miles away.
SCIENCE
September 22, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
British researchers think they have solved the decades-old mystery of why ancient Britons transported massive rocks 250 miles from Wales to Salisbury Plain to construct the massive but enigmatic Stonehenge monument: They believed the stones possessed healing powers.
SCIENCE
May 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Radiocarbon dating of cremated bodies excavated from Britain's Stonehenge appears to have solved part of the ancient mystery surrounding the 5,000-year-old site: It was a burial ground for what may have been the country's first royal dynasty. The new dates indicate burials began at least 500 years before the first massive stones were erected at the site and continued after it was completed, British archaeologists said Thursday .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Productions of "Norma" often set the scene at Stonehenge with singers running around in togas. But don't expect to see any of that in John Pascoe's staging of Bellini's Druid opera, which opens Saturday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. "Stonehenge is in England. 'Norma' is set in France--Gaul," the British-born Pascoe said in a recent interview. "The first records we have of Druid practices (predate) Stonehenge by many thousands of years.
WORLD
May 4, 2008 | Thea Chard, Times Staff Writer
The mysterious circle of stones that rises on Salisbury Plain near here has stood as an archaeological marvel for thousands of years, its origins and purpose shrouded in the mists of history. But a just-completed excavation of Stonehenge, the first within the ancient circle in more than 40 years, could provide some of the first reliable explanations for one of the greatest wonders of the prehistoric world. A team of British archaeologists hopes to prove its theory that nearly 4,000 years ago Stonehenge was regarded not as a place of sacrament for the dead, but as a temple with healing powers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Two men attacked the ancient monument of Stonehenge with a hammer and chipped off a piece of stone the size of a large coin, a conservation group said Thursday. Two men hacked the piece from the Heel Stone, the central megalith at the ancient site, English Heritage spokeswoman Debbie Holden said. They were spotted by security guards but escaped by jumping over a fence and driving off. "The damage is very, very slight because security guards spotted them straight away, but the whole thing is still upsetting," said Holden.
WORLD
May 4, 2008 | Thea Chard, Times Staff Writer
The mysterious circle of stones that rises on Salisbury Plain near here has stood as an archaeological marvel for thousands of years, its origins and purpose shrouded in the mists of history. But a just-completed excavation of Stonehenge, the first within the ancient circle in more than 40 years, could provide some of the first reliable explanations for one of the greatest wonders of the prehistoric world. A team of British archaeologists hopes to prove its theory that nearly 4,000 years ago Stonehenge was regarded not as a place of sacrament for the dead, but as a temple with healing powers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|