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Stop Gap Theater Group

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Students joined with professional actors Wednesday to explore causes of drug abuse in a play performed by the Stop Gap theater group at La Vista Continuation High School. In the play, called "Under Pressure," four young actors told the story of Mark, the son of an abusive alcoholic. To escape home pressures, Mark turned to drugs, which his mother eventually discovered. The 30-minute formal play ended with Mark leaving home to seek refuge at his uncle's house.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000 | Erika I. Ritchie, (949) 574-4211
STOP-GAP, a theater troupe that helps adults and youngsters explore the pressures in their lives, has received a grant from the Irvine Health Foundation. The nonprofit foundation, which works to improve the physical, mental and emotional well-being of Orange County residents, awarded a grant of $26,200 to STOP-GAP on Tuesday. The funds will be used to support an educational program for city students and drama therapy workshops for seniors at the Irvine Adult Day Health Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
For more than a decade, Stop-Gap, a Santa-Ana based theater troupe, has been lauded for its groundbreaking drama-therapy workshops. But the group's history of social activism, which has included work with battered women, drug users and the elderly, has overshadowed its reputation as a traditional theater company that stages three full-scale productions annually, founder and director Don Laffoon says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN
Stop-Gap drama therapy troupe recently tested its new, 45-minute "Know the Rules" play on about 50 seventh and eighth graders at Thurston Middle School in Laguna Beach. Troupe co-founders Victoria Bryan and Don R. Laffoon, who's also executive director, accompanied the four Stop-Gap actors-facilitators who staged five short skits. They interrupted themselves constantly to question students and bring them into the action. In the middle of one skit, facilitator Tracy Merrifield asked why actor Suzie Kane, playing a teen, so readily agreed to let a fast-talking, flattering stranger who claimed to work for a modeling agency take her photograph at his studio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000 | Erika I. Ritchie, (949) 574-4211
STOP-GAP, a theater troupe that helps adults and youngsters explore the pressures in their lives, has received a grant from the Irvine Health Foundation. The nonprofit foundation, which works to improve the physical, mental and emotional well-being of Orange County residents, awarded a grant of $26,200 to STOP-GAP on Tuesday. The funds will be used to support an educational program for city students and drama therapy workshops for seniors at the Irvine Adult Day Health Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
The Irvine Health Foundation has given a $21,250 grant to a theater company that specializes in performing plays on social issues at area schools. The grant will allow STOP-GAP to perform 50 of its socially relevant plays in Irvine schools and before youth groups. STOP-GAP members use drama and role-playing as a means of discussing subjects such as drug abuse and problems within families.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Talk to Don Laffoon about the Stop-Gap Theatre Company's latest project, Steven Tesich's farcical "Division Street," and the word "vision" keeps coming up. The nonprofit, Santa Ana-based drama therapy group, which Laffoon co-founded, is committed to vision--it's many productions over the years have attempted to clarify various social concerns, including AIDS, drugs, racism and date rape.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1993 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working people have problems too. Stop-Gap, Orange County's eminent drama therapy organization, which has been going into community centers and schools for 15 years, will soon be taking a new piece about breast cancer into businesses and corporations. "Every Part of Me . . . A Journey of Discovery," by Stop-Gap's resident playwright Robert Knapp, will premiere Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Performances are at 2 and 4 p.m., with a reception at 3. Both shows are open to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN
Stop-Gap drama therapy troupe recently tested its new, 45-minute "Know the Rules" play on about 50 seventh and eighth graders at Thurston Middle School in Laguna Beach. Troupe co-founders Victoria Bryan and Don R. Laffoon, who's also executive director, accompanied the four Stop-Gap actors-facilitators who staged five short skits. They interrupted themselves constantly to question students and bring them into the action. In the middle of one skit, facilitator Tracy Merrifield asked why actor Suzie Kane, playing a teen, so readily agreed to let a fast-talking, flattering stranger who claimed to work for a modeling agency take her photograph at his studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever felt like a demon resides inside your head, one that lets loose a tirade of criticism every time you turn around, one that gets out of bed before you do just to warm up to put you down? This demon says "What?! You screwed up again ? You're so stupid, if they put your brain on the head of a pin, it would roll around like a BB on a six-lane highway. Plus which, you're ugly. And fat. And lazy. And . . . ." Sound familiar?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pleas began almost immediately after the massacre in Littleton, Colo., in April: What could be done about the worsening plague of youth violence that left 15 dead when two students opened fire on their classmates?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER and DEBRA CANO and LISA ADDISON and HOPE HAMASHIGE
Theater performances are generally considered a form of entertainment, but Stop-Gap, a nonprofit troupe, believes theater can also be used as an educational tool. The group plans to use a $22,000 grant it recently received from the Irvine Health Foundation toward those endeavors. The grant will help support the company's educational touring presentations for Irvine students and theater-based programs for Irvine senior citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stop-Gap, which has used drama therapy to help thousands cope with teen pregnancy, drug abuse, AIDS and other troubles, is marking its 20th anniversary this year by inaugurating a training institute. "We certainly want Stop-Gap and the help it provides to outlive us," said co-founder and executive director Don R. Laffoon, 54. "We believe the institute is the way to do that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | MIMI KO
STOP-GAP, a Santa Ana-based theater company that promotes change through its plays, will hold its 15th anniversary gala dinner Oct. 15 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach. The nonprofit group's actors--both professionals and teen-agers who are recovering from drug abuse and other problems--last year put on educational programs in the form of short plays and workshops for about 24,000 students and adults throughout Orange and Los Angeles counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1993 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working people have problems too. Stop-Gap, Orange County's eminent drama therapy organization, which has been going into community centers and schools for 15 years, will soon be taking a new piece about breast cancer into businesses and corporations. "Every Part of Me . . . A Journey of Discovery," by Stop-Gap's resident playwright Robert Knapp, will premiere Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Performances are at 2 and 4 p.m., with a reception at 3. Both shows are open to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Students joined with professional actors Wednesday to explore causes of drug abuse in a play performed by the Stop Gap theater group at La Vista Continuation High School. In the play, called "Under Pressure," four young actors told the story of Mark, the son of an abusive alcoholic. To escape home pressures, Mark turned to drugs, which his mother eventually discovered. The 30-minute formal play ended with Mark leaving home to seek refuge at his uncle's house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER and DEBRA CANO and LISA ADDISON and HOPE HAMASHIGE
Theater performances are generally considered a form of entertainment, but Stop-Gap, a nonprofit troupe, believes theater can also be used as an educational tool. The group plans to use a $22,000 grant it recently received from the Irvine Health Foundation toward those endeavors. The grant will help support the company's educational touring presentations for Irvine students and theater-based programs for Irvine senior citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | MIMI KO
STOP-GAP, a Santa Ana-based theater company that promotes change through its plays, will hold its 15th anniversary gala dinner Oct. 15 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach. The nonprofit group's actors--both professionals and teen-agers who are recovering from drug abuse and other problems--last year put on educational programs in the form of short plays and workshops for about 24,000 students and adults throughout Orange and Los Angeles counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
The Irvine Health Foundation has given a $21,250 grant to a theater company that specializes in performing plays on social issues at area schools. The grant will allow STOP-GAP to perform 50 of its socially relevant plays in Irvine schools and before youth groups. STOP-GAP members use drama and role-playing as a means of discussing subjects such as drug abuse and problems within families.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever felt like a demon resides inside your head, one that lets loose a tirade of criticism every time you turn around, one that gets out of bed before you do just to warm up to put you down? This demon says "What?! You screwed up again ? You're so stupid, if they put your brain on the head of a pin, it would roll around like a BB on a six-lane highway. Plus which, you're ugly. And fat. And lazy. And . . . ." Sound familiar?
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