Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStop Loss
IN THE NEWS

Stop Loss

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2008 | Jen Chaney, Washington Post
"Stop-Loss" slipped in and out of theaters last spring with little fanfare, except for all those media reports that cited its poor box office performance as evidence that Iraq war movies don't sell. With its arrival on DVD, the Ryan Phillippe film seeks a wider audience. The plot is fairly straightforward. Brandon King (Phillippe), a decorated Army sergeant, comes home from the war to a hero's welcome but soon discovers he must return to Iraq. Frustrated and naively convinced that a senator can get him out of the situation, he goes AWOL, hops in a car with his best friend's girl (Abbie Cornish)
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 17, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
California's largest for-profit health insurer has agreed to pay a total of $1.62 million to seven hospitals to settle allegations that it failed to properly reimburse the providers for patient care. Anthem Blue Cross of California underpaid hospitals for charges that exceeded contracted daily rates, the California Department of Managed Health Care said in its agreement with the insurer. Anthem, a unit of health insurance giant WellPoint Inc. of Indianapolis, admitted no wrongdoing and said in a statement that it settled the matter to avoid litigation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
It is difficult to separate writer-director Kimberly Peirce's new film, "Stop-Loss," from a joke host Jon Stewart made in his monologue at the Oscars. Noting the poor box office performances in 2007 of Iraq-war-related films like "Redacted," "Rendition" and "In the Valley of Elah," Stewart issued a tongue-in-cheek, President Bush-like call for a surge of war movies. "Withdrawing the Iraq movies would only embolden the audience," he deadpanned. "We cannot let the audience win." He has a point.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The number of soldiers forced to remain in the military past their enlistment period under the government's "stop-loss" program will be cut in half within 15 months under a plan that will virtually eliminate the practice within two years, the Defense Department said Wednesday. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said the military would use involuntary retentions only in extraordinary situations and would turn to incentive programs to encourage people to extend their enlistments.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
Four thousand Americans and counting have died in Iraq, and the litany of unsuccessful films about that part of the world -- "The Situation," "Redacted," "Rendition," "The Kingdom," "In The Valley of Elah" among others -- is growing as well. Do not add “Stop-Loss” to that list. "Stop-Loss" is a film that does it right. The story of a young American soldier played by Ryan Phillippe who resists an order to return to Iraq, "Stop-Loss" covers some of the same territory as those other features.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
California's largest for-profit health insurer has agreed to pay a total of $1.62 million to seven hospitals to settle allegations that it failed to properly reimburse the providers for patient care. Anthem Blue Cross of California underpaid hospitals for charges that exceeded contracted daily rates, the California Department of Managed Health Care said in its agreement with the insurer. Anthem, a unit of health insurance giant WellPoint Inc. of Indianapolis, admitted no wrongdoing and said in a statement that it settled the matter to avoid litigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Is it a clever marketing campaign? Or a classic case of bait and switch? Promotions for "Stop-Loss" (due in theaters Friday) make it seem like the Iraq war homecoming drama is more interested in bringing "SexyBack" to an audience of MTV viewers than wrestling with complex issues confronting soldiers returning from active duty in the Middle East: post-traumatic stress disorder and the stop-loss military provision that can legally re-conscript combat...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
A lot of theories have been put forth as to why dramatic films on Iraq have not performed up to expectations, and one is that they've simply not been gripping films. "Stop-Loss," however, is different. The story of a young American soldier played by Ryan Phillippe who resists an order to return to Iraq, "Stop-Loss" covers some of the same territory as other features.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
When you buy a stock, your goal is to make money, naturally. But at the very least, you hope that if you're wrong about the stock, you can avoid losing too much money before you see the error of your ways and sell out. One of the most popular tools that some investors use to avoid stock disasters is the "stop-loss" order: You leave a standing order with your broker that a stock be sold if it at any time drops to a preset price.
SPORTS
October 9, 1986 | CHRIS COBBS, Times Staff Writer
The Chargers will have a new left cornerback, several starters returning from injuries, and a more recognizable quarterback in this week's game against Denver. These changes, which range from certain to probable to hoped for, were made public Wednesday as the Chargers began to emerge from the shock of the 33-7 loss to Seattle two days earlier. The new cornerback is Ken Taylor, a former Chicago Bear, who will replace the beleaguered Wayne Davis.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | By Chris Woolston,, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Americans spend billions on hair-care products each year, a remarkable investment for a part of the body with no real function. We clean it, nourish it and style it -- and we definitely mourn its loss. Lots of products and procedures promise to restore thinning or disappearing hair. One especially intriguing option is the HairMax LaserComb, a hand-held laser device that supposedly revives hair follicles. Hailed on TV news programs as a potential "cure for baldness," the device received FDA clearance for men in 2007.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Americans spend billions on hair-care products each year, a remarkable investment for a part of the body with no real function. We clean it, nourish it and style it -- and we definitely mourn its loss. Lots of products and procedures promise to restore thinning or disappearing hair. One especially intriguing option is the HairMax LaserComb, a hand-held laser device that supposedly revives hair follicles.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2008 | Tom Petruno and William Heisel, Times Staff Writers
Struggling thrift Downey Financial Corp. said Monday that it succeeded in stanching a recent outflow of deposits. But the lender warned that if cash began to flee again, it could face a hard time lining up new sources of capital. Newport Beach-based Downey, parent of Downey Savings & Loan, said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that "the bank experienced elevated levels of deposit withdrawals" after June 30, when deposits totaled about $9.8 billion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2008 | Jen Chaney, Washington Post
"Stop-Loss" slipped in and out of theaters last spring with little fanfare, except for all those media reports that cited its poor box office performance as evidence that Iraq war movies don't sell. With its arrival on DVD, the Ryan Phillippe film seeks a wider audience. The plot is fairly straightforward. Brandon King (Phillippe), a decorated Army sergeant, comes home from the war to a hero's welcome but soon discovers he must return to Iraq. Frustrated and naively convinced that a senator can get him out of the situation, he goes AWOL, hops in a car with his best friend's girl (Abbie Cornish)
NATIONAL
May 9, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The number of soldiers forced to remain in the Army involuntarily under the military's controversial "stop-loss" program has risen sharply since the Pentagon extended combat tours last year, officials said Thursday. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates was briefed about the program by Army officials who said that thousands of new stop-loss orders were issued to keep soldiers from leaving the service after Gates ordered combat tours extended from 12 to 15 months last spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
A lot of theories have been put forth as to why dramatic films on Iraq have not performed up to expectations, and one is that they've simply not been gripping films. "Stop-Loss," however, is different. The story of a young American soldier played by Ryan Phillippe who resists an order to return to Iraq, "Stop-Loss" covers some of the same territory as other features.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
As a weapon against osteoporosis, the drug's beginnings were inauspicious -- it was shelved for almost 50 years, and its main component is a mineral widely regarded as nonessential. But the compound could become a potent treatment for the bone-thinning disorder affecting millions of Americans. Called strontium ranelate, the medication is made from the mineral strontium, discovered in lead mines in Europe more than a century ago.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Americans spend billions on hair-care products each year, a remarkable investment for a part of the body with no real function. We clean it, nourish it and style it -- and we definitely mourn its loss. Lots of products and procedures promise to restore thinning or disappearing hair. One especially intriguing option is the HairMax LaserComb, a hand-held laser device that supposedly revives hair follicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
Four thousand Americans and counting have died in Iraq, and the litany of unsuccessful films about that part of the world -- "The Situation," "Redacted," "Rendition," "The Kingdom," "In The Valley of Elah" among others -- is growing as well. Do not add “Stop-Loss” to that list. "Stop-Loss" is a film that does it right. The story of a young American soldier played by Ryan Phillippe who resists an order to return to Iraq, "Stop-Loss" covers some of the same territory as those other features.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Is it a clever marketing campaign? Or a classic case of bait and switch? Promotions for "Stop-Loss" (due in theaters Friday) make it seem like the Iraq war homecoming drama is more interested in bringing "SexyBack" to an audience of MTV viewers than wrestling with complex issues confronting soldiers returning from active duty in the Middle East: post-traumatic stress disorder and the stop-loss military provision that can legally re-conscript combat...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|