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Stop Loss Orders

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BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
When you buy a stock, your goal is to make money, naturally. But at the very least, you hope that if you're wrong about the stock, you can avoid losing too much money before you see the error of your ways and sell out. One of the most popular tools that some investors use to avoid stock disasters is the "stop-loss" order: You leave a standing order with your broker that a stock be sold if it at any time drops to a preset price.
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NATIONAL
May 9, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The number of soldiers forced to remain in the Army involuntarily under the military's controversial "stop-loss" program has risen sharply since the Pentagon extended combat tours last year, officials said Thursday. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates was briefed about the program by Army officials who said that thousands of new stop-loss orders were issued to keep soldiers from leaving the service after Gates ordered combat tours extended from 12 to 15 months last spring.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
With October on Wall Street comes fear of a stock market plunge, a byproduct of the crises-ridden Octobers of 1987, 1989 and 1990. And rational or not, that fear is prompting some investors to seek protection--especially given the average stock's hefty 20%-plus gain this year. One common tool for nervous small shareholders: the "stop-loss" order, a standing order that automatically triggers the sale of a stock if it falls below a particular price.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2004 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
Sgt. Todd Stoner and Spc. Cliff Ponciano had turned in their gear and booked flights home. Their 4-year Army commitments had dwindled to the last couple of days. As they recently began the paperwork to process out, their return to civilian life was so close they could almost taste it. But their unit, the 2nd Brigade of the 10th Mountain Division, was on alert for possible duty in Iraq. Stoner and Ponciano had heard rumors circulating at Ft.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The number of soldiers forced to remain in the Army involuntarily under the military's controversial "stop-loss" program has risen sharply since the Pentagon extended combat tours last year, officials said Thursday. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates was briefed about the program by Army officials who said that thousands of new stop-loss orders were issued to keep soldiers from leaving the service after Gates ordered combat tours extended from 12 to 15 months last spring.
WORLD
June 3, 2004 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
Struggling to stretch its limited ranks, the U.S. Army said Wednesday that thousands of soldiers who were scheduled to leave the military will be ordered to stay if their units are being sent to Iraq or Afghanistan. The move imposes what the Army calls "stop-loss orders" on all units being deployed on missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2004 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
Sgt. Todd Stoner and Spc. Cliff Ponciano had turned in their gear and booked flights home. Their 4-year Army commitments had dwindled to the last couple of days. As they recently began the paperwork to process out, their return to civilian life was so close they could almost taste it. But their unit, the 2nd Brigade of the 10th Mountain Division, was on alert for possible duty in Iraq. Stoner and Ponciano had heard rumors circulating at Ft.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
Congressional investigators Monday were looking at new information that appears to contradict what Martha Stewart and her now-suspended broker have said about her sale of ImClone Systems Inc. stock. A House committee is interested in a widening circle of Stewart acquaintances. The latest is a doctor who also sold shares of the biotech company shortly before the government announced it had rejected ImClone's approval application for the cancer drug Erbitux.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2004 | From Reuters
Strained by operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. Army will boost its forces by 30,000 for the next four years through emergency authority, Gen. Peter Schoomaker, the Army chief of staff, told Congress on Wednesday. But Schoomaker, testifying to the House Armed Services Committee, rejected calls from lawmakers for a permanent increase in forces, saying it would undermine efforts to streamline and modernize the Army. He said he'd been authorized by Defense Secretary Donald H.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1990 | TOM PETRUNO
Everyone agrees that the stock market had good reason to plunge on the Iraq-Kuwait news and rising recession worries. But some analysts are flabbergasted by the destruction that certain stocks are suffering. Why has Hawthorne-based Mattel, for example, been knocked from $26.375 in May to $18 now, a decline of 32% even while the toy company's earnings remain very healthy? Why has AST Research, the Irvine computer firm, seen its stock tumble from $25.
WORLD
June 3, 2004 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
Struggling to stretch its limited ranks, the U.S. Army said Wednesday that thousands of soldiers who were scheduled to leave the military will be ordered to stay if their units are being sent to Iraq or Afghanistan. The move imposes what the Army calls "stop-loss orders" on all units being deployed on missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
Congressional investigators Monday were looking at new information that appears to contradict what Martha Stewart and her now-suspended broker have said about her sale of ImClone Systems Inc. stock. A House committee is interested in a widening circle of Stewart acquaintances. The latest is a doctor who also sold shares of the biotech company shortly before the government announced it had rejected ImClone's approval application for the cancer drug Erbitux.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
With October on Wall Street comes fear of a stock market plunge, a byproduct of the crises-ridden Octobers of 1987, 1989 and 1990. And rational or not, that fear is prompting some investors to seek protection--especially given the average stock's hefty 20%-plus gain this year. One common tool for nervous small shareholders: the "stop-loss" order, a standing order that automatically triggers the sale of a stock if it falls below a particular price.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
When you buy a stock, your goal is to make money, naturally. But at the very least, you hope that if you're wrong about the stock, you can avoid losing too much money before you see the error of your ways and sell out. One of the most popular tools that some investors use to avoid stock disasters is the "stop-loss" order: You leave a standing order with your broker that a stock be sold if it at any time drops to a preset price.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Live by the quick trigger, die by the quick trigger. Investors burned by last week's Emulex hoax are blaming financial-news organizations for rushing out headlines based on a bogus news release. In fact, the lawsuits already have started flying. Others complain that the Nasdaq Stock Market halted trading in Emulex too slowly, or too quickly, or perhaps shouldn't have halted trading at all.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1998 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMS
Brad Zigler had a problem. Named a fiduciary of a relative's estate this summer, he was charged with preserving the estate's assets until the money could be distributed. One of those assets was 1,000 shares of Computer Associates, a big software and data processing company that had experienced a huge run-up in its stock price. Zigler, an executive at the Pacific Exchange, worried that Computer Associates shares would drop before the assets were distributed.
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