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Stop The Church Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Hilferty learned some harsh realities about AIDS and homophobia in 1985 when his lover, film scholar Tom Hopkins, got sick and died. "Everything bad that could happen to two gay men happened," the 29-year-old filmmaker said. "Tom's family disowned him. The insurance company refused to pay for drugs. I was evicted from our apartment because society refused to acknowledge the validity of our relationship."
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NEWS
December 2, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ending a yearlong dispute with Cardinal Roger M. Mahony over televising a documentary that assailed the Roman Catholic Church's response to AIDS, KCET Channel 28 has revised its broadcast guidelines and pledged to offer a "balance of views" in all future programming.
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NEWS
September 9, 1991 | AMY KUEBELBECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles public television station KCET airs "Stop the Church," a controversial documentary about the Catholic church and AIDS, in which members of the activist group ACT UP disrupt Communion services at New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral and sprawl on the floor in a "die in." Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder asks, "How much allegiance is there to the Pope?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Sunday, KCET Channel 28 plans to air a half-hour program about church leaders--mostly Catholic--who are reaching out to help the Latino community cope with AIDS. But the Archdiocese of Los Angeles--still smarting over KCET's decision to air the short film "Stop the Church," about a demonstration by AIDS activists at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York--says the new program will not serve to mend fences.
NEWS
December 2, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ending a yearlong dispute with Cardinal Roger M. Mahony over televising a documentary that assailed the Roman Catholic Church's response to AIDS, KCET Channel 28 has revised its broadcast guidelines and pledged to offer a "balance of views" in all future programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Stop the message! That's what the Public Broadcasting Service is conveying to America with the yanking of "Stop the Church," a short film that captures the rage and desperation driving a 1989 demonstration in New York by the AIDS advocacy group Act-Up against elements of the Catholic Church and Cardinal John J. O'Connor. Some of Robert Hilferty's film makes you squirm. But that's exactly what challenging TV is all about. "Stop the Church" was to have aired Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While supporters of Cardinal Roger M. Mahony continued to cancel their memberships at public television station KCET on Saturday, a nearly equal number of Southern Californians offered moral and financial support to the station, which Friday night broadcast a short film about a protest by AIDS activists at a Catholic church.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, angered at KCET Channel 28's refusal to pull a controversial film on the church's response to AIDS, Thursday called on Southern Californians to consider withholding contributions to the public television station. While Mahony accused the station of surrendering to "blackmail" by gay advocates, KCET officials vowed to air the program as scheduled tonight at 10:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1991 | JANE HALL JANE HALL..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
In contrast to the public rebuke that Cardinal Roger M. Mahony delivered to KCET Channel 28 for broadcasting "Stop the Church," a 24-minute film that criticizes Catholic policies toward AIDS and homosexuality, the film's presentation on WNET here Friday night drew no reaction from Cardinal John O'Connor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
"Stop the Church," a 23-minute film about the gay activist group ACT UP that PBS pulled from its schedule last Monday, will be shown at the Nuart Theater in West Los Angeles, theater executives said Friday. The film, which criticizes the policies of the Catholic Church toward gays and was to have aired Aug. 27 as part of the PBS opinion series "P.O.V.," will be shown at 11 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Knotting loose ends. . . . One of the loosest is "P.O.V.," the PBS documentary series showcasing works of independent filmmakers. Its strong leftist tilt in the political films it airs is acknowledged by just about everyone, including its executive producer, Marc Weiss. The issue exploded anew last month when KCET Channel 28 aired "Stop the Church," a volatile documentary capturing AIDS activists viciously berating the Catholic Church in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KCET Channel 28 has lost an estimated $54,744 in contributions as a result of Catholic Cardinal Roger Mahony's call four weeks ago for subscribers to consider withdrawing their support from the public-television station. At the same time, the Los Angeles Archdiocese--which lashed out at KCET in an attempt to stop the station from airing "Stop the Church," a short film about a protest against the church's policies on AIDS at St.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1991 | JANE HALL JANE HALL..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
In contrast to the public rebuke that Cardinal Roger M. Mahony delivered to KCET Channel 28 for broadcasting "Stop the Church," a 24-minute film that criticizes Catholic policies toward AIDS and homosexuality, the film's presentation on WNET here Friday night drew no reaction from Cardinal John O'Connor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The mail is coming in about my column endorsing KCET's recent presentation of the controversial film "Stop the Church," and nearly all of it is critical and angry. Most writers accuse me of being both a fence-sitter and biased against Catholicism. Some note that I'm Jewish. As a rule, I don't respond in print to reader criticism because I believe the media should not automatically have the last word. We have enough access already.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Cardinal Roger M. Mahony wandered out among his flock on Sunday, he drew mixed reviews for his recent run-in with public television station KCET over a film he called "anti-Catholic propaganda." As Mahony made his first visit ever to a small Catholic church at the edge of Silver Lake, parishioner Donna DiMarco said: "I'm glad he said something about Catholic bashing. Most times we just take it and don't say anything." Ed Harper, another parishioner at the church, St.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | AMY KUEBELBECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles public television station KCET airs "Stop the Church," a controversial documentary about the Catholic church and AIDS, in which members of the activist group ACT UP disrupt Communion services at New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral and sprawl on the floor in a "die in." Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder asks, "How much allegiance is there to the Pope?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Sunday, KCET Channel 28 plans to air a half-hour program about church leaders--mostly Catholic--who are reaching out to help the Latino community cope with AIDS. But the Archdiocese of Los Angeles--still smarting over KCET's decision to air the short film "Stop the Church," about a demonstration by AIDS activists at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York--says the new program will not serve to mend fences.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The mail is coming in about my column endorsing KCET's recent presentation of the controversial film "Stop the Church," and nearly all of it is critical and angry. Most writers accuse me of being both a fence-sitter and biased against Catholicism. Some note that I'm Jewish. As a rule, I don't respond in print to reader criticism because I believe the media should not automatically have the last word. We have enough access already.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While supporters of Cardinal Roger M. Mahony continued to cancel their memberships at public television station KCET on Saturday, a nearly equal number of Southern Californians offered moral and financial support to the station, which Friday night broadcast a short film about a protest by AIDS activists at a Catholic church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A member of the KCET board of directors resigned and at least 90 other people canceled memberships Friday after Cardinal Roger Mahony denounced the public television station for its planned airing of a film critical of the Catholic Church's stance on AIDS and homosexuality.
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