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NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - No longer interested in shutting down the government, the Republican-led House approved legislation Thursday to keep it running into next year, jettisoning the GOP's earlier strategy of using the annual federal funding bill as leverage to extract spending cuts. The House approved the measure, 329 to 91. The Senate, where Democrats hold a narrow majority, is expected to approve it before the Oct. 1 deadline, averting a government shutdown at the start of the new fiscal year.
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SPORTS
March 3, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
PHOENIX - With fewer than three weeks remaining until opening day, the Dodgers don't know who's on second. Early signs point to newcomer Alex Guerrero starting the season in the minor leagues. Unless that changes, the Dodgers probably will resort to filling the position with some combination of players from a group that includes Dee Gordon, Justin Turner, Miguel Rojas, Chone Figgins and Brendan Harris. "It's up in the air," Manager Don Mattingly conceded. So far in the exhibition season, time at second base has been split between Guerrero and Gordon, which reflects the team's $28-million commitment to Guerrero and the upside of the fleet-footed Gordon.
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NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
The Senate on Thursday approved a spending measure that keeps the federal government open for three more weeks, likely the final short-term resolution before Congress and the White House must agree on a final budget for the fiscal year. The vote was 87-13 to approve the bill, which brings to $10 billion the total amount cut from 2010 spending levels. Like the similar vote in the House on Tuesday, the legislation generated greater opposition from increasingly vocal conservative Republicans eager to see cuts on par with the $60-billion figure that the lower chamber approved last month.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - A $1-trillion spending bill was headed for swift approval in the House by Wednesday, but legislation to extend unemployment insurance stalled in the Senate amid partisan bickering, dashing hopes for a quick deal to resume jobless benefits. Though negotiations continue, it appears increasingly unlikely that a compromise will be reached quickly to help the more than 1.4 million Americans who have been cut off from their unemployment benefits. An additional 72,000 Americans lose their insurance every week.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
The GOP-led House approved a short-term spending bill Tuesday but only after dozens of Republicans rejected the measure, forcing party leaders to rely on Democrats to achieve passage and help skirt a threatened government shutdown. The vote showed the mounting difficulty of resolving a budget stalemate that has consumed Washington for weeks. The Senate is expected to vote on the bill before Friday, when government funding to keep agencies operating runs out. But similar resistance from conservatives is expected in that chamber.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin Monday said he will oppose extending the federal government’s debt limit unless it is part of a broader plan to deal with financial issues. Speaking at the University of Charleston, Manchin, a former governor who has been at odds with his own party before, challenged Democrats and Republicans to find common ground on the budget. “We must get our fiscal house in order,” the West Virginia senator said in remarks released by his office.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | Associated Press
A nearly empty Senate gave final congressional approval Wednesday to stopgap legislation that will provide money for the federal government through Nov. 14 and allow Congress more time to finish work on the annual money bills for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. The measure, which the House passed on a 272-156 vote last week, was sent to the White House on a voice vote. President Reagan is expected to sign it.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Senate, trying to buy a little more time to pass the largest spending bill in history, approved today and sent President Reagan a fourth temporary measure to keep the government running--this time until Friday. White House spokesman Larry Speakes said Reagan will sign the stopgap measure, lasting until midnight tonight, because Congress is making progress on long-term legislation that is needed to allow the government to spend money through Sept. 30, 1987.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
House Republican leaders, bowing to pressure from both the White House and their Senate colleagues, agreed to a stopgap measure that will forestall a tax increase on American workers that was scheduled to take effect Jan. 1. The deal is expected to come to a vote Friday under procedures that would require all members in both chambers to agree. If any members object, Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) would call the House back into full session next week for a vote, he told reporters Thursday.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Congressional budget negotiators are expected to work through the weekend on a $33-billion spending reduction package, but the two sides remain far apart on details and have little time to vote before Friday's deadline to avoid a federal government shutdown. It appears increasingly likely that another stopgap measure — the seventh this fiscal year — may be needed as Republican and Democratic appropriators try to decide which domestic programs and services to cut for the remainder of 2011.
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Obama and the Democrats won; Republicans and the tea party lost. And both sides are gearing up for next time. Now that our recent brush with financial crisis is behind us, it's time to start planning for the next one. That's the problem Congress set up in the stopgap deal that ended the 16-day government shutdown and averted a collision with the debt ceiling. After all the sound and fury, the two parties agreed only on continuing federal spending at its current level until Jan. 15 and raising the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. PHOTOS: Tea party backlash: Protest signs to cheer you up This was the epitome of a temporary cease-fire: An arrangement that freezes in place a situation neither side liked to begin with.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The prevailing wisdom on Capitol Hill on Monday was that the federal government is headed toward at least a brief shutdown at midnight, given the impasse over how, if at all, President Obama's new healthcare law should figure into any stopgap spending plan. But as House GOP leaders met, they were also considering a stopgap measure that would fund the government for another week or so as talks continue. That could push a deadline for action closer to the next budget fight, the need to raise the nation's debt limit in mid-October.
OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Try as they might, House Republican leaders are having trouble stopping their colleagues from shooting themselves in the foot - again. Having failed to approve any of the 12 annual appropriations bills that fund federal agencies, Congress has to pass a stopgap spending bill by Sept. 30 to keep much of the federal government from shutting down. But rank-and-file Republicans in the House are resisting their leadership's proposed stopgap because it wouldn't necessarily block funding for the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a.k.a.
OPINION
June 11, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Even though the state's budget situation has improved, it will be years before California's community colleges will be able to offer adequate numbers of courses. Hundreds of thousands of students will continue to be shut out of classes they need. Though normally we would deplore creating a two-tiered educational system within the community colleges, now isn't the time to stick to lofty principles about equal pricing for all. The loftiest thing that state legislators could do now is to help students of all financial backgrounds get through college.
OPINION
December 5, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Are we about to go over a fiscal cliff? It's looking more likely, but it may not be as alarming as it sounds. Here are three things you need to know about the impending crisis over the so-called fiscal cliff, the combination of tax increases and automatic spending cuts due to kick in at the turn of the year: First, it's not really a cliff; it's merely a steep, scary slope. If Congress doesn't act, federal taxes will increase by more than $500 billion next year and federal spending will be cut by about $200 billion.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congress will meet for only a few final days this week to enable lawmakers to campaign full time in the battle for control of Capitol Hill, leaving much business undone until after the election. The House convenes for three days to wrap up its work, while the Senate, where Democrats have the majority, is considering a similar truncated schedule. Lawmakers had initially been scheduled to work through the first week of October. The one must-pass piece of legislation - a bill to keep the government funded once the new fiscal year begins Oct.1 - is set for final approval this week in the Senate after having already cleared the House.
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Obama and the Democrats won; Republicans and the tea party lost. And both sides are gearing up for next time. Now that our recent brush with financial crisis is behind us, it's time to start planning for the next one. That's the problem Congress set up in the stopgap deal that ended the 16-day government shutdown and averted a collision with the debt ceiling. After all the sound and fury, the two parties agreed only on continuing federal spending at its current level until Jan. 15 and raising the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. PHOTOS: Tea party backlash: Protest signs to cheer you up This was the epitome of a temporary cease-fire: An arrangement that freezes in place a situation neither side liked to begin with.
NEWS
June 28, 1986 | Associated Press
California Lottery Director M. Mark Michalko said Friday that the state will award a ticket contract for a single game as a stopgap measure to avoid running out of tickets. Michalko said he will proceed with bids on a pact to supply subsequent games. Michalko announced plans earlier this week to end the state's pact with Georgia-based Scientific Games Inc.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - No longer interested in shutting down the government, the Republican-led House approved legislation Thursday to keep it running into next year, jettisoning the GOP's earlier strategy of using the annual federal funding bill as leverage to extract spending cuts. The House approved the measure, 329 to 91. The Senate, where Democrats hold a narrow majority, is expected to approve it before the Oct. 1 deadline, averting a government shutdown at the start of the new fiscal year.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Los Angeles Times
Cadillac's all-new flagship sedan, the XTS, is apparently a little confused about the difference between intern and interim. You and I both know that someone in an interim role will temporarily yet capably fill a vacant position. Meanwhile, interns sometimes stumble through tasks that might seem straightforward. The 2013 XTS is an interim at the top of Cadillac's sedan lineup. What came out was closer to an intern. General Motors' luxury marque has been without a flagship sedan since 2011, when the DTS and STS sedans reached the end of their life cycles.
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