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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | ANNE BOGART
In Paris, women clutch flirtatious little Chanel bags, so small they hold next to nothing. In New York, they take the opposite tack, lugging mega-tote bags that bend their backs into Quasimodo crouches, so they can keep their subway reading, gym clothes and other such sundries close at hand. But in Los Angeles, women breeze around town carrying nothing except a set of keys. That's because the quintessential California purse comes with four wheels and a trunk.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dropbox is unveiling new ways for people to hold onto and share their digital stuff as it tries to build on the popularity of its online storage service. With an initial public offering in the works, Chief Executive Drew Houston said his company is moving into its next chapter, which positions Dropbox as a “home” on the Internet to house documents, photos and videos across all devices and share them with friends, family and co-workers. With rising competitive pressures from technology giants Google and Microsoft and from start-up rival Box, which recently filed to go public, Dropbox is looking to give people new reasons to use Dropbox.
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NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The school locker, long feared as a repository of drugs and weapons, is making a comeback. Some administrators are returning the metal boxes to campus, figuring it's better than creating a generation of students with back problems. In one Orange County school district, a board member who watched a student wobble and fall over from the weight of her backpack has proposed reinstalling lockers in middle schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Gale Holland
In a break with the city's earlier confrontational stance, Los Angeles' chief administrative officer Monday proposed a $3.7-million skid row cleanup program that would increase 24-hour bathroom access for homeless people and expand storage for their belongings. The proposal, which must be approved by the City Council, calls for setting aside part of a skid row parking lot where homeless people can check their shopping carts and small bins for the day. The plan would also expand a seven-day storage operation by 500 bins, and move a 90-day storage facility east of Alameda Street into the heart of skid row. The increased round-the-clock bathroom access would be funded by the city at existing skid row shelters and social service agencies.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Cloud storage for three of Google's more popular services -- Gmail, Googe Drive and Google+ -- are being combined to give users more control over how they want to use the storage space. By combining them, users will now have access to 15 gigabytes of storage for free that they can use for their emails, Google documents and photos on the Google+ social network. Previously, users had 10 GB that they could use for Gmail and an additional 5 GB for Google Drive and Google+ photos. More storage is available for a monthly fee. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 "Maybe you're a heavy Gmail user but light on photos, or perhaps you were bumping up against your Drive storage limit but were only using 2 GB in Gmail," Google said in a blog post . "Now it doesn't matter, because you can use your storage the way you want.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
A local congressman is urging federal officials to more thoroughly investigate the safety of a San Pedro butane storage facility that has become controversial because of its location near homes, schools and shopping areas in San Pedro. On Wednesday, Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) sent a letter to the Department of Homeland Security demanding that the agency take additional steps to protect the public from the risk of explosion at the Rancho LPG Holdings site on North Gaffey Street.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Although Microsoft's 128 GB Surface Pro tablet is advertised as having 128 gigabytes of storage, the amount of space available to users is much less than that. That's also true for the 64 GB model. The Redmond, Wash., company confirmed Tuesday that the 128 GB Surface Pro has 83 GB of free storage, while the 64 GB version comes with 23 GB of open space. The reason for the difference: space already taken up by the tablet's Windows 8 Pro operating system and various preinstalled apps.
HOME & GARDEN
November 15, 2008
Retailers may be hurting, but one category of furniture is doing just fine: storage. "Customers are looking for solutions as they move back home with parents, or take roommates as a way to control expenses in this tough economy," says Yumiko Whitaker, an IKEA spokeswoman for Los Angeles and Orange counties. In many instances, the hottest pieces offer stealth storage -- compartments large or small that are camouflaged by the design. For a look at these clever pieces, including budget-minded buys from Macys, EQ3 in Burbank and West Elm in Santa Monica and Rancho Cucamonga, head online to latimes.com/home.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Need more storage space on Google Drive? Google is offering users an additional 10 gigabytes of free cloud storage for the next two years if they download and try the company's Quickoffice app, which recently received a major update and is now available free. Quickoffice lets users create and edit Microsoft Office files from their Apple iOS and Android devices. VIDEO CHAT: Unboxing the iPhone 5s "And while the easiest thing to do is simply convert your old files to Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, Quickoffice gives you another way to work with people who haven't gone Google yet," Google said in a blog post explaining the app.  To get the free extra storage, simply download Quickoffice and open the app. Users will be prompted to log in to their Google account.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996
What Pico Rivera residents didn't know about the gas company never hurt them. But state environmental officials think they should know just the same. For more than a decade, the Southern California Gas Co. has stored up to 200 55-gallon drums of toxic waste. The company has had an interim permit to store waste at the facility since 1983. That came as a surprise to many residents as well as administrators of a nearby elementary school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Addressing several lingering skid row conflicts, a top Los Angeles city budget official Monday proposed a $3.7-million cleanup plan that would increase 24-hour bathroom access for homeless people and expand storage for their belongings. The proposal, which must be approved by the City Council, calls for setting up a skid row parking lot where homeless people could check in their shopping carts for the day. The plan would also increase an existing short-term storage operation by 500 bins, from 1,136 to 1,636, and move a 90-day storage facility east of Alameda Street into the heart of skid row. The round-the-clock bathroom access would be provided at skid row shelters and social service agencies under contract to the city.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Washington state accused the federal government Monday of missing crucial legal deadlines to clean up 56 million gallons of highly radioactive waste at the former Hanford nuclear weapons site in southeastern Washington, demanding a new set of schedules by April 15. Gov. Jay Inslee and state Atty. Gen. Bob Ferguson sent a letter to Energy Secretary Ernest J. Moniz demanding that eight new double-shelled storage tanks be built to hold waste that is in leaky underground tanks with single steel walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
The troubled Central Basin Municipal Water District violated the state's open meeting laws when it created a $2.7-million fund in virtual secrecy, an investigation by the agency's attorneys concluded. The fund, created for a groundwater storage project, was managed without public hearings or notifications, and records related to it were among those subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. The subpoenas came after an FBI raid on the Sacramento offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
The troubled Central Basin Municipal Water District violated the state's open-meeting laws when it created a $2.7-million fund in virtual secrecy, an investigation by the agency's attorneys concluded. The fund, created for a groundwater storage project, was managed without public hearings or notifications, and records related to it were among those subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. The subpoenas came after an FBI raid on the Sacramento offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello)
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft is encouraging users to try its Bing and OneDrive services by offering them 100 GB of free cloud storage for one year. Users can earn the storage by signing up for Bing Rewards, a program that gives users credits every time they use Microsoft's search engine. Those credits can then be traded in for rewards, such as gift cards. Microsoft said users who earn 100 credits can redeem them for the free storage with OneDrive, the company's cloud service that was formerly known as SkyDrive.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The free ride's over, MobileMe users. Apple has begun informing users of its now defunct cloud-storage service, MobileMe, that they will no longer have the complimentary storage space on iCloud they've enjoyed the past two years. When Apple introduced iCloud, a cloud storage service that replaced MobileMe, it allowed MobileMe customers to have 25 gigabytes of storage free even though iCloud only offered 5 GB free to new customers. Apple said the gesture was an expression of its appreciation for MobileMe users who paid $99 per year for the service.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) urged the nation's governors to ensure the safe storage of ammonium nitrate, a dangerous chemical that exacerbated the April explosion at the West, Texas, fertilizer plant.   “We know what has to be done. Ammonium nitrate has to be stored in a separate facility," said Boxer at a press conference Tuesday. "It's not rocket science here. "   When heated or contaminated, ammonium nitrate can explode. Hundreds were injured and 15 died in the blast, which also damaged or destroyed nearby homes, businesses and three unoccupied schools.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Anthony York
TULARE - Visiting an international agriculture fair Wednesday that drew tens of thousands of visitors to the heart of the Central Valley, Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari said the state's lack of preparedness for the drought that is devastating the region's farmers and ranchers was an example of Gov. Jerry Brown's failed leadership. “We know that droughts happen and … we're totally unprepared,” Kashkari said during a talk-radio show being broadcast from the World Ag Expo, surrounded by massive tractors and automatic grape harvesters.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Six months after agreeing to drop the SkyDrive brand, Microsoft has finally announced the new name of its cloud storage service: OneDrive. The Redmond, Wash., tech company unveiled the new name Monday, saying OneDrive conveys the mission of the service, which is to let users access their important files from many devices by storing them all in one location. "We know that increasingly you will have many devices in your life, but you really want only one place for your most important stuff," the company said in a blog post Monday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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