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BUSINESS
December 29, 2013 | By Evan Halper
NEWARK, Del. - The thick blue cables and white boxes alongside an industrial garage here look like those in any electric-car charging station. But they work in a way that could upend the relationship Americans have with energy. The retrofitted Mini Coopers and other vehicles plugged into sockets where a Chrysler plant once stood do more than suck energy out of the multi-state electricity grid. They also send power back into it. With every zap of juice into or out of the region's fragile power network, the car owner gets paid.
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WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - After a frantic search across a wide section of central Mexico, authorities said Wednesday that they had found a stolen truck that was transporting a large amount of dangerous radioactive material, a substance that can be used in making dirty bombs. The truck and its contents were found in the state of Mexico, about 20 miles north of the capital, not far from where they were stolen Monday. But the metal container with the radioactive material had been opened by the thieves, who then chucked it about half a mile from where they abandoned the truck, an official with the Mexican nuclear safety commission told The Times.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California's electric utilities and other power sellers better hope that scientists and engineers come up with a surefire way to bottle lightning. That's a dramatic way of describing the more prosaic goal of finding a way to store large amounts of electricity, something that, up until now, did not seem practicable. On Thursday, the state Public Utilities Commission voted to create a formal "energy storage target" of 1,325 megawatts -- equivalent to the output of almost three modern, natural gas-fired power plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2013 | By Bob Pool
The neighborhood seemed perfect for the two Hollywood artists. Nestled beneath the Hollywood sign, the duplex that first-time homeowners John Sullivan and Carrie Dennis bought was near the studios he deals with and the Hollywood Bowl where she performs. The place was built in 1924 by a man who used a mule and gold-mining equipment as collateral, then bought by a woman who had gotten a loan from actress Mary Pickford. When Sullivan and Dennis acquired the home, it was owned by a painter who used one of the units as a studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
A pharmaceutical mogul who traveled the world collecting objects made by native artists and left them to a trust in London probably never would have guessed that 30,000 of those works would end up at UCLA's Fowler Museum. Now, with the museum turning 50 with a celebratory splash of exhibitions, one might ask: What would Sir Henry Wellcome think? The mega collector - who was born in a Wisconsin log cabin in 1853 and died a titled Englishman in 1936 - would probably be surprised that the African and Pacific core of the Los Angeles museum's 120,000-piece holding of world arts consists of works he selected.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Need more storage space on Google Drive? Google is offering users an additional 10 gigabytes of free cloud storage for the next two years if they download and try the company's Quickoffice app, which recently received a major update and is now available free. Quickoffice lets users create and edit Microsoft Office files from their Apple iOS and Android devices. VIDEO CHAT: Unboxing the iPhone 5s "And while the easiest thing to do is simply convert your old files to Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, Quickoffice gives you another way to work with people who haven't gone Google yet," Google said in a blog post explaining the app.  To get the free extra storage, simply download Quickoffice and open the app. Users will be prompted to log in to their Google account.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
DENVER - When the worst of the flooding began for Weld County last week, Cliff Willmeng, on a hunch, took his 2003 Subaru and drove east. The county's roads and bridges had begun to disintegrate under the might of the historic floodwaters, to the point that Willmeng, an environmental activist, had trouble navigating. Yet what his gut had told him to look for had been, as he put it, "unfortunately easy to find. " What Willmeng saw, and also photographed, was the drowning of Weld County's extensive oil and gas drilling operations - hundreds of fracking wells that were underwater, and an unknown number of storage tanks and other industrial facilities assaulted by the untamed waters.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Nowadays when tech companies say they specialize in storage, we assume they're talking about cloud computing. But West Los Angeles start-up Clutter deals with the real, physical mess in your life -- you know, clothes you never wear, old high school yearbooks, childhood "art" projects, the like. The concept is simple: Download Clutter's free iPhone app and arrange to have the company's water-resistant reusable plastic storage boxes delivered for free to your doorstep. You can get up to five free boxes at a time.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Motorola has touted its new Moto X as one of the most customizable smartphones on the market. To press the point, AT&T, the wireless carrier that is selling the device, invited us to trick out our own Moto X, which finally arrived in the mail. Join us at 11:30 a.m. as The Times' Michelle Maltais and I check out the new device. LIVE DISCUSSION: We'll unbox the Moto X at 11:30 a.m. PDT I ordered my device a few days ago and asked for a 16 GB Moto X with a dark blue back cover and white front cover.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By David A. Keeps
A water-view home with a patch of grass just didn't float Misty Tosh's boat, but when the television producer came upon a 1980s three-story houseboat in Marina del Rey, she dove right in. “It was a giant hunk of slapped-together junk - dark and dank, chopped up into tiny rooms with ladders between the floors,” said Tosh, who bought it two years ago. “People thought I was nuts, but I saw the potential.” Sure, remodeling a houseboat has...
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