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NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
Halloween is my favorite time of year. And I love to be scared. Over the years, I've been through my fair share of theme park mazes, independent haunted attractions and backyard spookfests. I even dress up every Halloween as a chainsaw-wielding maniac in a hockey mask and scare the neighborhood kids at the haunted house on our block. So I like to think I've seen it all - from the mundane to the extreme. But I've never experienced anything like McKamey Manor . > Photos: Inside the McKamey Manor backyard haunt in San Diego On Friday night I went through the backyard haunt tucked behind the three-bedroom, brick-and-stucco home of Russ and Carol McKamey in an otherwise ordinary San Diego subdivision near Poway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz
In the annals of Texas journalism, Robert Heard stands out for many things: a biting wit, a prolific career, a lawyer's understanding of lawmaking, a determination to get the story even at considerable personal risk. It was the last trait that catapulted him from news reporter to news figure on Aug. 1, 1966, when he was shot in the shoulder during Charles Whitman's bloody rampage from the top of the University of Texas Tower in Austin. Heard, a 36-year-old Associated Press reporter, had followed two highway patrol officers on a wild sprint across a parking lot, but he forgot his Marine's training to zigzag.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2010 | James Rainey
The list of freelance writing gigs on Craigslist goes on and on. Trails.com will pay $15 for articles about the outdoors. Livestrong.com wants 500-word pieces on health for $30, or less. In this mix, the 16 cents a word offered by Green Business Quarterly ends up sounding almost bounteous, amounting to more than $100 per submission. Other publishers pitch the grand opportunities they provide to "extend your personal brand" or to "showcase your work, influence others." That means working for nothing, just like the sailing magazine that offers its next editor-writer not a single doubloon but, instead, the opportunity to "participate in regattas all over the country."
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Steven Pressman
In the spring of 1939, on the eve of the Holocaust, Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus set out on a highly unlikely mission. The handsome lawyer and his stylish wife left their two young children and their comfortable home near Philadelphia's Rittenhouse Square, sailed across the Atlantic Ocean and made their way into Nazi-controlled Austria. Their goal: to rescue 50 Jewish children from Vienna and bring them to safety in the United States. The fact that the Krauses were Jewish added to the daunting challenges and long odds that stood in their way. Yet another obstacle was American attitudes and policies during the 1930s that all but shut the door to Jews trapped by the Third Reich.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011
'Stories From Korea' What: Los Angeles Master Chorale Where: Walt Disney Concert Hall, downtown L.A. When: 7 p.m. March 6 Tickets: $24 to $114 Information: (213) 972-7282 or http://www.lamc.org
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The industry's chief lobbying group wants to do a better job of telling Hollywood's story. The Motion Picture Assn. of America is launching a new website today called The Credits that provides feature stories, graphics and facts and figures intended to offer more insight into the people and businesses that make the film and television industry run. "I don't think the industry has done a very good job of telling its story," said Chris Dodd, chairman...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Prolific filmmaker Hong Sang-soo's latest experiment in form, "In Another Country," is a beguiling set of variations on a theme, a gossamer-light étude composed for delight rather than dissection. The movie comprises a triptych of vignettes, each about half an hour long and centering on a French woman, played by Isabelle Huppert, who's visiting a seaside town in South Korea. The three scenarios are presented as the creations of a young screenwriter (Jung Yumi) who's at loose ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Elmore Leonard died in August at the age of 87. But writing can bring a kind of immortality, and the modern noir master has come to life, again, in the form of two new short stories. Today, the San Francisco-based digital imprint Byliner publishes "Confession" and "The Trespassers," both of which were written in 1958 when Leonard was an ad man working at a Detroit agency, Campbell Ewald.  "What's interesting is to see where Elmore Leonard, the young writer, started, to study his simple Hemingway-influenced style," Peter Leonard, Elmore Leonard's son, said in a Byliner press release.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Buzzfeed is reporting that three previously unavailable stories by J.D. Salinger have been leaked online this evening, apparently in PDF and other versions of a small print book. The collection, titled “Three Stories,” and featuring a plain black cover, includes “Birthday Boy,” “Paula” and “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls.” The latter piece is a precursor, of sorts, to “The Catcher in the Rye,” detailing the death of Holden Caulfield's brother, named Kenneth in the story, not Allie as he is in the finished book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Hisaye Yamamoto, one of the first Asian American writers to earn literary distinction after World War II with highly polished short stories that illuminated a world circumscribed by culture and brutal strokes of history, has died. She was 89. Yamamoto had been in poor health since a stroke last year and died in her sleep Jan. 30 at her home in northeast Los Angeles, said her daughter, Kibo Knight. Often compared to such short-story masters as Katherine Mansfield, Flannery O'Connor and Grace Paley, Yamamoto concentrated her imagination on the issei and nisei, the first- and second-generation Japanese Americans who were targets of the public hysteria unleashed after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Updated and edgy, this multi-story house sits behind gates in Hollywood Hills West. Described by the design firm as a "transitional take on a classic Mediterranean," the home retains such characteristic details as interior and exterior wrought-iron railings, arched windows and a tile roof. Location: 1427 Queens Road, Los Angeles 90069 Asking price: $3.698 million Year built: 1937 Remodel: Bravia Design House size: Four bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3,554 square feet Lot size: 5,882 square feet Features: Library, family room, breakfast area, kitchen island, hardwood floors, whole-house audio, terraces, outdoor living room with flat-screen TV, fountain-fed swimming pool About the area: Last year, 195 single-family homes sold in the 90069 ZIP Code at a median price of $2.25 million, according to DataQuick.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Kari Howard
Ever since I started working with Raja Abdulrahim on her Syria stories two years ago, I've listened to Radiohead while editing them. It didn't start out as a running soundtrack to a writer and the conflict she still covers, but Radiohead's music has that combination of sorrow and alienation and dread and vulnerability that runs through the Syria conflict. I remember choosing “Talk Show Host” for the first story. (Warning: There's a bit of Anglo-Saxon language.) Its line about “I'll be waiting with a gun and a pack of sandwiches” seemed to echo the story's juxtaposition of violence and everyday life.
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | By Anne Colby
What would Los Angeles look like if it were a landscape of ever-changing native plants instead of one composed of evergreen lawns and shrubs? L.A. artist Fritz Haeg set out to help people visualize Southern California this way. "In Los Angeles, we've tended to promote landscapes that look the same all the time," Haeg says. "Not only the same within radically different landscapes from the coast to the desert but also looking the same throughout the year. " Last October, Haeg launched Wildflowering L.A. Working with the Los Angeles Nomadic Division, or LAND, he recruited participants to plant wildflowers on 50 diverse, viewable sites countywide.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Terry Bradshaw has a loyal following in Pittsburgh. I don't know. Something about winning four Super Bowls with some team called the Steelers. So who better than the blond bomber to kick off a summer concert series June 14 that also features Motown legend Smokey Robinson and old-school favorites the Oak Ridge Boys and 38 Special at the Meadows Casino in Washington, Pa., about 30 minutes outside of the Steel City? Sounds great. He can just stand there and tell football anecdotes while laying on that down-home charm that has made him a favorite during Fox's football coverage all these years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By John Horn
SYDNEY, Australia - The video playing on the television inside Baz Luhrmann's bedroom was supposed to be much steamier. But where there should have been desirous bumping and prurient grinding, the couples were remarkably chaste, as if they had been ordered to abstain from all manner of randy moves. "Look at this," the filmmaker behind "Moulin Rouge!" and "The Great Gatsby" said from the foot of his bed. "You couldn't get any more sexless. " Working inside the creative compound he calls Iona in Sydney's arty Darlinghurst neighborhood, Luhrmann was sitting with a reporter, reviewing news clips from 1980s Australian ballroom dancing competitions, whose judges favored technique over passion.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Now that didn't take long. A little over a week after Los Angeles Magazine broke the story of Yasiel Puig's harrowing escape from Cuba to become the Dodgers' star outfielder, the rights to the Jesse Katz article have been sold to Hollywood. And good luck casting that part. Brett Ratner and his RatPac Entertainment made the purchase. Ratner is the director who gave Marvel possibly its worst movie, “X-Men: The Last Stand.” Purchase of the story was broken by The Hollywood Reporter , which, it should be noted, is owned by executives of Guggenheim Partners, which just happen to own the Dodgers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010
The 14th Dalai Lama A Manga Biography Tetsu Saiwai Penguin, $15 paper A graphic biography of the leader of the Tibetan government-in-exile and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. The Alchemist A Graphic Novel Paulo Coelho, illustrated by Daniel Sampere HarperOne, $22.99 A visual reinterpretation of the magical tale of Spanish shepherd boy Santiago's journey in search of a treasure buried in the Egyptian pyramids.
SPORTS
February 17, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday's third round of golf in the Northern Trust Open was like the line in the old TV series "Naked City. " There were eight million stories at Riviera. Here are three.   Barber can cut it Blayne Barber, 69-70-72 - 211; two under, tied for 22nd. He is a tour infant. He looks like shaving is a new deal, so walking the storied fairways made legendary by Hogan and Snead, Palmer and Nicklaus, had to be overwhelming. He played for Auburn in last year's NCAA championships at Riviera and tied for seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Yes, he even falls with grace. Mikhail Baryshnikov doesn't get much opportunity to dance in "Man in a Case," a performance piece that has been adapted from the Anton Chekhov short stories "The Man in a Case" and "About Love. " The most he offers is a few moves wreathed in air quotes. But there's a point in the production, which opened Thursday at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica, when he slides down a steep flight of steps that is more revealing of his character than anything thus far in his portrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Karolina Waclawiak
Haunted people wander through cul-de-sacs reeling from small-scale catastrophes or pace through Parisienne arrondissements wishing for different lives in Elizabeth McCracken's "Thunderstruck and Other Stories. " Her second fiction story collection is a stunningly beautiful rumination on loss. "You are so unlucky you don't want to brush up against anyone who isn't," a narrator laments in "Something Amazing. " Sadness is an infection, an allergen, a communicable disease, passing from mother to mother as children are lost or die. McCracken's vapor of misfortune threads around her characters and binds them.
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