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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
What is it, Gay Talese is asking, about sports? It occupies a messy, emotional territory in which we embrace, and, just as easily, discard, heroes. "It's not just losing the game," Talese reflects, voice etched with the soft syllables of southern New Jersey, where he was born in 1932. "You lose the game enough, or get knocked out enough, you lose your job. " There's an empathy in his bearing, a recognition of the challenges facing ballplayers, many of whom, "feel more at home on the grassy fields and hotel lobbies and locker rooms than they do in the suburban houses that most of them will begin to share next week with their wives and children" as he wrote in "On the Road, Going Nowhere, With the Yankees," a New York Times piece about the end of the 1979 season.
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NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Actress Scarlett Johansson topped the box office charts last weekend playing the character of Black Widow in the Marvel superhero flick "Captain America: The Winter Soldier. " That same weekend she was on screen as a man-eater of a different type in the cryptic indie sci-fi film "Under the Skin. " As a space alien in human form who lures male victims into a mysterious black void, Johansson gives a performance at once sinister, sultry and unexpectedly sympathetic. If "Captain America" was the latest product of a studio franchise machine, "Under the Skin" was the handcrafted result of writer-director Jonathan Glazer's 10-year quest to bring a singular experience to the screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011
'Stories From Korea' What: Los Angeles Master Chorale Where: Walt Disney Concert Hall, downtown L.A. When: 7 p.m. March 6 Tickets: $24 to $114 Information: (213) 972-7282 or http://www.lamc.org
BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Set at the end of a cul-de-sac behind glass gates, this newly built three-story contemporary in the Beverly Crest area makes the most of its site with expanses of glass bringing in canyon views. Retractable walls further the indoor-outdoor vibe, opening the house to a wall planted with succulents, an infinity pool and a spa. Location: 9852 San Circle, Beverly Hills 90210 Asking price: $7.995 million Year built: 2014 House size: Seven bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, 9,000 square feet Lot size: 17,651 square feet Features: High ceilings, open staircase, bar, den, office, kitchen island with breakfast bar, three indoor fireplaces, fire pit, covered patio, elevator, parking for six cars About the area: Last year, 369 single-family homes sold in the 90210 ZIP Code at a median price of $3.425 million, according to DataQuick.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The industry's chief lobbying group wants to do a better job of telling Hollywood's story. The Motion Picture Assn. of America is launching a new website today called The Credits that provides feature stories, graphics and facts and figures intended to offer more insight into the people and businesses that make the film and television industry run. "I don't think the industry has done a very good job of telling its story," said Chris Dodd, chairman...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2010 | James Rainey
The list of freelance writing gigs on Craigslist goes on and on. Trails.com will pay $15 for articles about the outdoors. Livestrong.com wants 500-word pieces on health for $30, or less. In this mix, the 16 cents a word offered by Green Business Quarterly ends up sounding almost bounteous, amounting to more than $100 per submission. Other publishers pitch the grand opportunities they provide to "extend your personal brand" or to "showcase your work, influence others." That means working for nothing, just like the sailing magazine that offers its next editor-writer not a single doubloon but, instead, the opportunity to "participate in regattas all over the country."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Prolific filmmaker Hong Sang-soo's latest experiment in form, "In Another Country," is a beguiling set of variations on a theme, a gossamer-light étude composed for delight rather than dissection. The movie comprises a triptych of vignettes, each about half an hour long and centering on a French woman, played by Isabelle Huppert, who's visiting a seaside town in South Korea. The three scenarios are presented as the creations of a young screenwriter (Jung Yumi) who's at loose ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Buzzfeed is reporting that three previously unavailable stories by J.D. Salinger have been leaked online this evening, apparently in PDF and other versions of a small print book. The collection, titled “Three Stories,” and featuring a plain black cover, includes “Birthday Boy,” “Paula” and “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls.” The latter piece is a precursor, of sorts, to “The Catcher in the Rye,” detailing the death of Holden Caulfield's brother, named Kenneth in the story, not Allie as he is in the finished book.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | Column One, http://www.latimes.com/ColumnOne
Some journalism goes beyond headlines and breaking news. Read the stories that can open your mind and touch your heart. For over 40 years, Column One has featured some of the best of our writing on the front page. Now you can find it online, as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Elmore Leonard died in August at the age of 87. But writing can bring a kind of immortality, and the modern noir master has come to life, again, in the form of two new short stories. Today, the San Francisco-based digital imprint Byliner publishes "Confession" and "The Trespassers," both of which were written in 1958 when Leonard was an ad man working at a Detroit agency, Campbell Ewald.  "What's interesting is to see where Elmore Leonard, the young writer, started, to study his simple Hemingway-influenced style," Peter Leonard, Elmore Leonard's son, said in a Byliner press release.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Kari Howard
One of the qualities I value most in the writers of the Great Reads are their powers of observation. I'm a big believer in showing, not telling -- in giving those little scenes and details that make readers connect to people whose lives might seem impossibly remote from theirs. The writer of Friday's powerful Great Read, Raja Abdulrahim, is particularly gifted: She finds those moments when she's directly in the line of fire in Syria. In Friday's story, Raja, who has made her way into rebel-held territory many times during the three-year conflict, wrote from Aleppo, where life alternates between terror and a grotesque version of normalcy.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - When the email proposing a business meeting in Charleston popped up, it took all of three seconds to say yes. I'd never been to South Carolina, but I've read glowing dispatches from friends and colleagues for years. Southern hospitality is not a myth, they insisted, as they extolled the beauty of the area and its vigorous dining and bar scene. When I started to research this coastal city, it was its Civil War-era attractions that proved most compelling. After all, the war "started" here when Confederate forces forced Union troops from Ft. Sumter in April 1861.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - As soon as Suzy Sanders got word of the shooting at Ft. Hood on Wednesday, she began frantically texting her 21-year-old stepson, a soldier stationed at the Army post. His first chilling reply landed more than an hour later, at 5:22 p.m. "It happened right in front of me Suz," Pvt. Jacob "Jake" Sanders texted. "I watched my sergeant die. I tried to revive him. I'm fine. I love you. " Jake Sanders, a former varsity basketball player from a small town in Indiana, has a brown crew cut, square jaw and wide smile.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday's Santa Anita Derby is an eight-horse race, but the kind of buzz that has accompanied California Chrome, ever since he blew the field away in the March 8 San Felipe, makes it difficult for the other contenders to get any attention. California Chrome not only runs like the wind -- he has won his last three races by a total of 19 lengths -- but he and his connections present several stories that are hard to ignore. There is much talk that he would become only the fourth-ever Cal-bred to do so if he won the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas - The Final Four has grown so large they had to move it from Planet Earth to Jerry World. It actually makes sense a stadium nicknamed "The Billion Dollar Play Pen" should host college basketball's billion-dollar end games. It makes less sense that everyone except the players seems to be cashing in. This being Texas, of course, one host city was not enough to handle the event, as the NCAA granted this bid to the wide-open-spaces sweep of "North Texas. " That means Amarillo, technically, got a Final Four in the modern era before Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Mark Stock, a painter known for his evocative portraits of white-gloved butlers and sad, stylish women in slinky gowns, has died. He was 62. Stock, who died Wednesday at an Oakland hospital, had an enlarged heart, his publicist Charlotte Parker said. His most famous painting, "The Butler's in Love - Absinthe," a study of a butler scrutinizing a lipstick smear on an empty glass, inspired a short David Arquette film, "The Butler's in Love" (2008). It is one of more than 100 Stock paintings featuring butlers, often in poses suggesting suppressed longing or brooding disappointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Hisaye Yamamoto, one of the first Asian American writers to earn literary distinction after World War II with highly polished short stories that illuminated a world circumscribed by culture and brutal strokes of history, has died. She was 89. Yamamoto had been in poor health since a stroke last year and died in her sleep Jan. 30 at her home in northeast Los Angeles, said her daughter, Kibo Knight. Often compared to such short-story masters as Katherine Mansfield, Flannery O'Connor and Grace Paley, Yamamoto concentrated her imagination on the issei and nisei, the first- and second-generation Japanese Americans who were targets of the public hysteria unleashed after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.
SPORTS
February 17, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday's third round of golf in the Northern Trust Open was like the line in the old TV series "Naked City. " There were eight million stories at Riviera. Here are three.   Barber can cut it Blayne Barber, 69-70-72 - 211; two under, tied for 22nd. He is a tour infant. He looks like shaving is a new deal, so walking the storied fairways made legendary by Hogan and Snead, Palmer and Nicklaus, had to be overwhelming. He played for Auburn in last year's NCAA championships at Riviera and tied for seventh.
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
The Phoenix Suns were in town and handed the Lakers much more to ponder beyond another surprisingly rare and easy victory. The Suns couldn't control Chris Kaman, lost Sunday's game by a 115-99 score and offered the perfect time to explore some big-picture questions involving their past employees. What will the Lakers do with Coach Mike D'Antoni? BOX SCORE: Lakers 115, Suns 99 What will happen with Steve Nash, who won two NBA most-valuable-player awards in Phoenix under D'Antoni?
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