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SPORTS
September 28, 1992 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Jets Coach Bruce Coslet, who may or may not know by now that nobody wins a skirmish with the New York media, is 0-4 after Sunday's 18-10 loss to the Rams and acting even angrier by the loss. His postgame news conference Sunday lasted at the most two minutes, providing little insight into how a team many predicted would go deep into the playoffs has fallen so far, so fast, making so many mistakes.
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NATIONAL
October 29, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani
ATLANTIC CITY - With a monster Hurricane Sandy steadily approaching, the New Jersey coast shuddered as predictions of a storm unlike any in memory began to come true. Some low-lying seashore towns were already underwater by high tide Monday morning, hours before the storm makes landfall. The latest storm track shows Hurricane Sandy taking a hard left turn in the Atlantic and heading for a direct hit on New Jersey. Best predictions had the storm center roaring ashore near Atlantic City or farther north.
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NEWS
February 10, 1999 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite fender benders and gloom, Orange and Los Angeles counties on Tuesday were spared the drenching that forecasters had been predicting, thanks to an unexpected northward shift in the storm center. With steady afternoon rain in the San Fernando Valley, intermittent sprinkles in downtown Los Angeles, light rain in Orange County and gusts in the mountains, the day turned out to be little more than dreary, messy and drizzly.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2012 | By David Zucchino
PHILADELPHIA -- High winds bent trees and rainwater coursed through the emptied streets early Monday as Hurricane Sandy's outer bands whipped through southeastern Pennsylvania, which lies smack in the path of the mammoth storm.  Philadelphia and surrounding towns and suburbs hunkered down, with the region's trains and subways shut down, and schools, government offices and most businesses closed. "This is not a typical storm," Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett told reporters. "This is a hurricane wrapped in a nor'easter.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
Hurricane Earl swirled swiftly to life southeast of Bermuda, packing winds of 75 m.p.h. in the open Atlantic but posing little threat to land. "With the normal westerlies that you get at high latitudes, the jet stream carries it right out to sea," forecaster Gil Clark said. Thursday evening, the storm center was about 800 miles southeast of Bermuda and was moving north-northwest at 12 m.p.h., according to the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables, Fla.
NEWS
September 26, 1986
Powerful storms raged across the northern Plains with 76-m.p.h. winds and heavy rains that killed two girls in South Dakota, while up to 32 inches of snow fell on the Snowbird, Utah, ski resort. In the East, eight record high temperatures were set, with the warm and humid weather preceding the storms as they moved east. Strong winds swirled around the storm center, which was stationed over Montana. Winds gusted to 76 m.p.h. at Redig, S. D., 71 m.p.h. at Bismarck, N. D., and 63 m.p.h.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radar readings showed the storm whisking away toward the desert, but outside the Orange County Storm Center late Tuesday morning, cold rain still fell in dreary sheets. Then a new wrinkle arose: a county consultant's forecast of a wet, wet afternoon ahead. "Bad news," county employee Mel Newman said as he passed the forecast along to the six men and women stationed in the county's "nerve center" for storm operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992
Evening showers pounded Orange County on Sunday as a fast-moving cold front swept through the area, dumping heavy rain throughout the county. Expect the cold front to remain in full force today, bringing as much as two inches of rain in some areas. And if last week is any indication, expect a frustrating commute with monumental traffic jams on the freeways--a virtual given whenever it rains in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2005 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
In an industrial complex between Angel Stadium and the Arrowhead Pond, Orange County's storm emergency-response center sprang into action with the recent torrential rains. The public works crews it sends into the field were put to the test, as at least 12 homes were threatened by landslides or left uninhabitable and a 16-year-old Silverado Canyon girl was killed by a falling boulder.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | STEPHANIE SIMON and KATE FOLMAR and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The latest storm to ram California killed at least six people, including two police officers and two college students, and swiped savagely at hillsides, highways and rail tracks, scattering despair and destruction before blowing out of the state Tuesday. At least one other person died and another was missing across the border in Tijuana in the 49th storm to hit that city this winter. The intense rainfall forced 550 people from their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
With impeccable source material and a talented creative team"ENMV0002398"> " ENMV0002398"> , "The Eye of the Storm"is an ambitious stab at what might be called the Great Australian Film. The results are off-and-on impressive, but the project's ambitions turn out to be greater than its ability to achieve them. "Eye of the Storm" is based on a massive, 600-plus page novel by the celebrated Australian writer Patrick White, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1973, the same year this savage tale of the psychological horrors family members inflict on one another was published.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2012 | By David Zucchino and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Hurricane Isaac stalled over southeastern Louisiana on Wednesday morning, dumping torrential rains across the Gulf Coast and pounding low-lying areas with 8- to 10-foot storm surges and 75-mph winds. The National Hurricane Center warned that hurricane conditions would persist all day and into the evening for storm-battered coastal residents. The huge, slow-moving storm knocked down trees and power lines, flooded roads and highways and sent bands of wind and rain pelting an area from New Orleans to the Florida panhandle.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The northeastern United States, especially the New York metropolitan area, braced for hazardous weather on Thursday as severe thunderstorms were forecast to roll through the region, creating a weather event similar to the “derecho” that rocked the Washington area last month. There is “potential for a widespread damaging wind event/derecho” beginning Thursday afternoon across an area roughly from Ohio to Connecticut, according to the U.S. Storm Predication Center in Oklahoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2005 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
In an industrial complex between Angel Stadium and the Arrowhead Pond, Orange County's storm emergency-response center sprang into action with the recent torrential rains. The public works crews it sends into the field were put to the test, as at least 12 homes were threatened by landslides or left uninhabitable and a 16-year-old Silverado Canyon girl was killed by a falling boulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County is in for a soggy and shivery Saturday with an inch or more of rain expected, a chance of flooding in the foothills and a dusting of snow on mountaintops. "I doubt that this storm will create severe landslides like [Southern California] had two winters ago," said Amy Talmage, a meteorologist for WeatherData Inc., which provides forecasts for The Times. "But it will be a lot of rain for one day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite fender benders and gloom, Los Angeles on Tuesday was spared the drenching that forecasters had been predicting, thanks to an unexpected northward shift in the storm center. With steady afternoon rain in the San Fernando Valley, intermittent sprinkles in downtown Los Angeles and gusts in the mountains, the day turned out to be little more than dreary, messy and drizzly.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The northeastern United States, especially the New York metropolitan area, braced for hazardous weather on Thursday as severe thunderstorms were forecast to roll through the region, creating a weather event similar to the “derecho” that rocked the Washington area last month. There is “potential for a widespread damaging wind event/derecho” beginning Thursday afternoon across an area roughly from Ohio to Connecticut, according to the U.S. Storm Predication Center in Oklahoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1992
A winter storm that arrived late Sunday afternoon caused scattered power outages and is expected to dump up to 2 inches of rain on San Diego before it dies out this weekend, the National Weather service said Monday. The storm, accompanied by winds gusting up to 20 m.p.h., arrived Sunday afternoon and brought nearly half an inch of rain by Monday night, said Wilbur Shigehara, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in San Diego.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite fender benders and gloom, Orange and Los Angeles counties on Tuesday were spared the drenching that forecasters had been predicting, thanks to an unexpected northward shift in the storm center. With steady afternoon rain in the San Fernando Valley, intermittent sprinkles in downtown Los Angeles, light rain in Orange County and gusts in the mountains, the day turned out to be little more than dreary, messy and drizzly.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
Flood waters unleashed by Tropical Storm Mitch rose quickly across Honduras and Nicaragua on Friday, trapping tens of thousands of people with little food or water and raising the number of confirmed dead to 127. The U.S. Coast Guard, meanwhile, continued to search for a four-masted schooner missing since Tuesday off Honduras. The Fantome, a Windjammer Barefoot Cruises yacht once owned by Aristotle Onassis, had 31 people aboard.
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